Department of Education

Viewing archives for Subject Pedagogy

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a particular interest in the teaching of poetry, and of English in the sixth form.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

Judith Hillier has been at the University of Oxford Department of Education since 2007, where she leads the science PGCE programme, teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education, and also runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year physics undergraduates. She is Fellow and Vice-President of Kellogg College, Oxford. Prior to that, after completing a degree in Physics at the University of St Andrews and her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator. Judith’s research interests lie in the education of science teachers, the recruitment and retention of physics teachers, the role of language in the development of scientific explanations in the classroom, and gender and diversity in STEM education. She is on the Editorial Boards for Research in Science and Technological Education and for Physics Education, and has conducted the evaluations for the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics  for the Institute of Physics for the last 7 years. She has mentored at the 2020 and 2021 European Science Education Research Association Doctoral Summer Schools, and was part of the local organising committee in 2020.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Gary supervises students on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course and has been a Curriculum Tutor for the PGCE English course.

He was Head of English at Impington Village College, Cambridge before undertaking doctoral research at the Institute of Education in London. Since then, he has continued to teach A Level and IB English part-time, whilst working in a variety of other roles – as the editor of Teaching English (the magazine of the National Association for the Teaching of English); as a Curriculum Tutor at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; as a provider of teacher INSET for A Level and IB English Literature; and as a curriculum developer and consultant for the International Baccalaureate Organisation and other exam boards.

His doctoral research investigated conceptions of English as a discipline, focusing on students’ and lecturers’ attitudes to the subject, and their approaches to teaching and learning, at A Level and in HE. He continues to be interested in the history and theory of English as a discipline, and the ways in which tensions resulting from this history manifest themselves in attitudes and approaches of teachers and students in post-16 classrooms in schools and universities. He has a pa