Department of Education

Viewing archives for Subject Pedagogy

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Wonyong is a DPhil student in science education and focuses on using history and philosophy of science to improve science (physics) teaching in secondary schools.

A native of South Korea, he received BSc, MSc degrees in physics education and a teaching certificate from Seoul National University. He has taught in secondary schools in Seoul and SNU Extension College as a part-time instructor. As a research assistant for the multidisciplinary 3-year OARS (Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science Education) project funded by Templeton World Charity Foundation, Wonyong is examining how science teachers in Oxfordshire collaborate with religious education teachers to promote argumentation in classroom.

His recent areas of interests include nature of science in pre- and in-service teacher education, integrated STEM education, philosophy of scientific experimentation, teacher collaboration across subjects, and using disasters in science education. His DPhil project aims to investigate how science teachers engage in the enactment and assessment of NOS in science lessons, under the supervision of Sibel Erduran and Judith Hillier.

Liam is a Research Officer currently working on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

Before joining the department, Liam completed his PhD research at the University of Limerick School of Education and the National Centre for STEM Education (EPI·STEM) under the supervision of Dr Orla McCormack and Prof Sibel Erduran. His research focus has primarily been on teachers’ epistemic beliefs and perceptions of their teacher education, particularly science teachers. However, Liam has also been involved in a range of other research projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education, a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms, an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam is particularly motivated by exploring the challenges and possibilities for teachers drawing on educational research for classroom practice and to this end, he is a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research.

Liam also serves as a reviewer for the International Journal of Science Education and NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research.

Sonia is a DPhil (PhD) student at the Department of Education, Oxford, focusing on teacher expertise.

Her research aims to investigate how expert teachers do what they do from within the boundary of teachers’ classroom teaching and learning experiences from a sociocultural perspective, which holds that learning is founded within participation in social and cultural practices. She has derived from both the psychological and sociological fields, from the works of Vygotsky and Bernstein.

She holds a degree in Master of Education with specialisation in Curriculum and Teaching from National Institute of Education (NIE), National Technological University, Singapore; Master of Philosophy in English from Kurukshetra University, India.

She is a former Middle and High School English Teacher in international schools in Singapore, and a Post Graduate Teacher of English in public schools in New Delhi, India. She has received a Senior Hulme Scholarship consecutively for two years 2016-17 from Brasenose College for exceptional academic performance.

Publications

Khan, S. (2016). Five brooks one purpose. In Y. Fang, A. M. Nandy, D. Liew, H.M. Sun, S.P. Tan, & S. Khan (Eds.)., Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Fang, Y., Nandy, A. M., Liew, D., Sun, H. M., Tan, S. P., & Khan, S. (Eds.). (2016). Singapore Teachers: Narratives of Care, Hope and Commitment. Singapore: World Scientific.

Vicky is a curriculum tutor on the PGCE science course, teaching sessions and visiting interns in their schools.

For 10 years she taught chemistry and science in secondary schools in Oxfordshire, Spain and New Zealand.

In 2004-2005 she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry School teacher Fellowship, to focus on writing teaching resources in up-to-date contexts. Following this she became a freelance education consultant, working for organisations such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Nuffield Foundation, Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme and SCORE (the Science Community Representing Education).

For 10 years she was the chemistry editor of Catalyst magazine, which is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying science. She taught on the PGCE course at King’s College London before joining the department in Oxford in 2013.

From 2012-2018 she held a Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship at King’s College London where she researched the relationship between school mathematics and science education in the policy sphere and in schools.

Her research interests include:

  • Students’ use of mathematics within science
  • Maximising learning during practical work in science
  • Chemistry education
  • Science education policy and its impact on practice in schools

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion acr