Department of Education

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Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Lara has been working in online education for the last six years, supporting universities and academics in their transition to blended and online learning.

Some of the notable projects she has worked on include:

  • The development and presentation of the University of Cape Town’s first accredited blended postgraduate diploma.
  • The creation of an online tutor training course for GetSmarter’s academic staff.
  • A blended learning collaboration between the University of Namibia and the University of Cape Town to transform the current MSc in Civil Engineering to a blended format.
  • The development and presentation of GetSmarter’s first international short course with Goldsmiths, University of London.

Lara completed her Masters in Higher Education at the University of Cape Town in 2019. In her doctoral study she plans to explore the affordances and limitations of online education with regard to different subject matter.

Her areas of interest are online education, higher education, pedagogy, digital literacy, and digital inequalities.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in App