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Geoffrey Walford is Emeritus Professor of Education Policy and an Emeritus Fellow of Green Templeton College at the University of Oxford.

He was previously Reader in Education Policy at Oxford, and Senior Lecturer in Sociology and Education Policy at Aston Business School, Aston University, Birmingham.

He has academic degrees from Oxford, Kent, London and the Open Universities, has authored or edited more than 40 books, and published rather too many academic articles and book chapters. He was Joint Editor of the British Journal of Educational Studies from 1999 to 2002, and was Editor of the Oxford Review of Education from 2004 to 2010. He remains as a Deputy Editor of Ethnography and Education and serves on several editorial boards.

Professor Walford’s main research foci are the relationships between central government policy and local processes of implementation, private schools, choice of schools, religiously-based schools, and ethnographic research methodology. He remains engaged with various scholarly writing activities working, in particular, on issues connected to private schooling for the poor and social justice. He was awarded a DLitt from Oxford University in 2016.

Publications

Major articles and book chapters

  • Geoffrey Walford (2023) ‘Low-fee private schools.’  In Bob Tierney, Fazal Rizvi and Kadriye Wrcikan (editors-in-chief); Fazal Rizvi and Jason Beech (eds.) Section 1, Globalization and shifting geopolitics of education, International Encyclopedia of Education 4th edition, Vol 1 (Oxford: Elsevier) pp.355-365.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2022) ‘Country houses repurposed as private schools: what might be the motivations?’  Oxford Review of Education, 48, 1, pp. 14-27.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2021) ‘Country houses repurposed as private schools: building on inequality.’ Oxford Review of Education, 47, 3, pp. 369-385.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2021) ‘What is worthwhile auto-ethnography? Research in the age of the selfie.’ Ethnography and Education, 16, 1, pp. 31-43.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2020) ‘Interviews and interviewing in the ethnography of education.’ In George W. Noblit. (ed.) Oxford Encyclopedia of Qualitative Research Methods in Education (New York: Oxford University Press) (Reprint) pp. 672-685.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2020) ‘Ethnography is not qualitative.’ Ethnography and Education, 15, 1, pp. 122-136.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2019) ‘The provenance of Stowe. Percy Warrington: the founder schools wished to forget.’ History of Education Researcher, 104, pp. 100-108.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2018) ‘The impossibility of anonymity in ethnographic research.’ Qualitative Research, 18, 5, pp. 516-525.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2018) ‘Interviews and interviewing in the ethnography of education.’Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Education, Editor in Chief: George W. Noblit. On-line. DOI: 10.1093/acrefore/9780190264093.013.320, May, pp. 20.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2018) ‘Recognisable continuity. A defence of multiple methods.’ In Dennis Beach, Carl Bagley, and Sofia Maques da Silva (eds.) The Wiley Handbook of Ethnography of Education (London, Wiley) pp. 17-29.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2017) ‘Ruling-class classification and framing.’ In Agnés Van Zanten (ed.) Elites in Education, Volume 2, National Traditions and Cosmopolitism in Elite Education. (London, Routledge) (Reprint)
  • Geoffrey Walford (2016) ‘Ethnographic methodology: A Virtual Special Issue of Ethnography and Education. Introduction.’ Ethnography and Education.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2015) ‘The globalisation of low-fee private schools’ In Joseph Zajda (ed.) Second International Handbook on Globalisation, Education and Policy Research (Amsterdam, Springer) ISBN: 978-94-017-9492-3, pp. 309-20.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2014) ‘Site selection within comparative case study and ethnographic research.’ (Reprint) In Malcolm Tight (ed.) Case Studies (London, Sage)
  • Ian Macpherson, Susan Robertson and Geoffrey Walford (2014) ‘An introduction to privatisation, education and social justice.’ In Ian Macpherson, Susan Robertson and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) Education, Privatisation, and Social Justice: Case studies from Africa, South Asia, and South East Asia (Abingdon, Symposium) pp. 9-24.
  • Ingrid Lunt and Geoffrey Walford (2014) ‘Contributions to the sociology of education: Past, present and future. A Festschrift for John Furlong.’ Oxford Review of Education, 40, 4, pp. 411-414.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2014) ‘From City Technology Colleges to Free schools: Ideas of social justice.’ Research Papers in Education, 29, 3, pp. 315-329.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2014) ‘Introduction: Academies, Free Schools and social Justice.’ Research Papers in Education, 29, 3, pp. 263-267.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2013) ‘The development of private and public schools in England.’ In Aydin Gürlevik, Christian Palentien and Robert Heyer (eds.) Privatschulen versus staatliche Schulen (Wiesbaden, Germany: Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden) pp. 89-102.  ISBN: (pb) 978-3-531-18199-8; (e-book) 978-3-531-18978-9.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2013) ‘Low-fee private schools: a methodological and political debate.’ In Prachi Srivastava (ed.) Low-Fee Private Schooling: Aggravating equity or mitigating disadvantage? (Oxford: Symposium Books) pp. 199-213. ISBN: 978-1-873927-91-5.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2013) ‘State support for private schooling in India: What do the evaluations of the British Assisted Places Schemes suggest?’ Oxford Review of Education, 39, 4, pp. 533-547.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2013) ‘The development of private and public schools in England.’ In Aydin Gürlevik, Christian Palentien and Robert Heyer (eds.) Privatschulen versus staatliche Schulen (Wiesbaden, Germany: Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden) pp. 89-102.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2013) ‘Low-fee private schools: a methodological and political debate.’ In Prachi Srivastava (ed.) Low-Fee Private Schooling: Aggravating equity or mitigating disadvantage? (Oxford, Symposium Books) pp. 199-213.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2012) ‘Researching the powerful in education: a re-assessment of the problems.’ International Journal for Research and Method in Education, 35, 2, pp. 111-118
  • Geoffrey Walford (2011) ‘Globalization and low-fee private schools?’ Educational Practice and Theory, 33, 1, pp. 37-50.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2011) ‘The Oxford Ethnography Conference: A place in history?’ Ethnography and Education, 6, 2, pp. 133-145.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2011) ‘Low-fee private schools in England and in less economically developed countries. What can we learn from a comparison?’ Compare, 41, 3, pp. 401-413.
  • Eric Tucker, Madhu Viswanathan and Geoffrey Walford (2010) ‘Reflections on social measurement:  How social scientists generate, modify, and validate indicators and scales.’ In Geoffrey Walford, Eric Tucker and Madhu Viswanathan (eds.) The Sage Handbook of Measurement(London, Sage) pp. 1-5.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2010) ‘Faith-based schools in England after ten years of Tony Blair’, in Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Blair’s Educational Legacy? (London, Routledge) pp. 52-62.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2009) ‘For ethnography?’ Ethnography and Education, 4, 3, pp. 273-284.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2009) ‘Private schools in England.’ Zeitschrift für Pädagogik, 55, 5, pp. 716- 731.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2009) ‘The practice of writing ethnographic fieldnotes.’ Ethnography and Education, 4, 2, pp. 117-130.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2009) ‘Symposium review of: John Beck, Meritocracy, Citizenship and Education’ (with Anthony Giddens and Yoshiko Nozaki) British Journal of Sociology of Education, 30, 1, pp. 97-105.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘Finding the limits: autoethnography and being an Oxford University Proctor.’ In Paul Atkinson and Sara Delamont (eds.) Representing Ethnography (London, Sage) pp. 147-162.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘Selecting sites, and gaining ethical and practical access.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.)How to do Educational Ethnography (London, Tufnell Press) pp. 16-38.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘The nature of educational ethnography.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) How to do Educational Ethnography (London, Tufnell Press) pp. 1-15.
  • Martin Forsey, Scott Davies and Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘The globalisation of school choice: an introduction to key issues and concerns.’ In Martin Forsey, Scott Davies and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) The Globalisation of School Schoice? (Abingdon, Symposium Books) pp. 9-25.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘School choice in England: globalisation, policy borrowing or policy corruption? In Martin Forsey, Scott Davies and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) The Globalisation of School Schoice? (Abingdon, Symposium Books) pp. 95-109.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ’Faith-based schools in England after 10 years of Tony Blair.’ Oxford Review of Education, 34, 6, pp. 689-699.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘Muslim schools in England and the Netherlands: sustaining cultural continuity.’ In Zvi Bekerman and Ezra Kopelowitz (eds.) Cultural Education – Cultural Sustainability: Minority, diaspora, indigenous and ethno-religious groups in multicultural societies. (London, Routledge)
  • Geoffrey Walford (2007) ‘Finding the limits: autoethnography and being an Oxford University Proctor.’ In Alan Bryman (ed.) Qualitative Research 2, Volume 3 Issues of Representation and reflexivity (London, Sage) pp. 214-229.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2007) ‘Classification and framing of interviews in ethnographic interviewing. Ethnography and Education, 2, 2, pp. 145-157.
  • Geoffrey Walford and Prachi Srivastava (2007) ‘Examining Private Schooling in Less Economically Developed Countries: Key Issues and New Evidence.’ In Prachi Srivastava and Geoffrey Walford (2007) (eds.) Private Schooling in Less-Economically Developed Countries: Asian and African perspectives (Abingdon, Symposium Books)
  • Geoffrey Walford (2007) ‘Everyone generalizes, but ethnographers should resist doing so.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Methodological Developments in Ethnography (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 12) (Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, Elsevier)
  • Geoffrey Walford (2006) ‘New Christian schools in England: What are the equity mplications?’ International Journal of Learning, 13, 5, pp. 167-176.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2006) ‘From City Technology Colleges to sponsored grant-maintained schools.’ In David Phillips and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) Tracing Education Policy. Selections from the Oxford Review of Education(London, Routledge) pp. 359-375.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2006) ‘Introduction: education and the Labour Government.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Education and the Labour Government. An evaluation of two terms. (London, Routledge).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2005) ‘Learning and the local community: Is community involvement always a good thing?’ International Journal of Learning, 11, pp. 1219-1225.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2005) ‘Research ethical guidelines and anonymity.’ International Journal of Research and Method in Education, 28, 1, pp. 83-93.
  • Holger Daun, Reza Arjmand and Geoffrey Walford (2004) ‘Muslims and education in a global context.’ In Holger Daun and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) Educational Strategies among Muslims in the Context of Globalization. Some National Case Studies. (Leiden, Boston, Brill) pp. 5-36.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2004) ‘Private schooling in England’ (in Chinese) Journal of Non-Government Educational Development, 103, pp. 55-60.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2004) ‘When tradition meets modern law: changing the role of the Oxford University Proctors.’ Research in Education, 72, pp. 103-114.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2004) ‘No discrimination on the basis of irrelevant qualifications.’ Cambridge Journal of Education, 34, 3, pp. 353-361.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2004) ‘Finding the limits: autoethnography and being an Oxford University Proctor.’Qualitative Research, 4, 3, pp. 403-417.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘Country Report on school-based management in England.’ Precedings of the Third International Forum on Educational Reform Education Decentralization Revisited: School-Based Management(Bangkok, Office of the Education Council) pp. 1-23.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘Separate schools for religious minorities in England and the Netherlands: using a framework for the comparison and evaluation of policy.’Research Papers in Education , 18, 3, pp 1-19.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘School choice, educational change and inequality in England.’ In The Organising Committee (eds.) Proceedings of the 37th Annual Conference of the Japan Educational Administration Society(Tokyo, Dojidai Sha, Nichi-nichi Kyoiku Bunko)  pp. 19-49 (in Japanese) pp.147-172 (in English).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘Muslim schools in Britain.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) British Private Schools: research on policy and practice. (London, Woburn Press) pp. 158-174.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘Introduction.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) British Private Schools: research on policy and practice. (London, Woburn Press) pp. 1-8.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘School choice and educational change in England and Wales.’ In  David N. Plank and Gary Sykes (eds.) Choosing Choice: School Choice in International Perspective (New York & London, Teachers College Press) pp. 68-91.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘Education.’ In W. S. F. Pickering (ed.) Durkheim Today, New York, Oxford, Berghahn Books,  pp. 105-115.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘Introduction.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Doing a Doctorate in Educational Ethnography (Studies in  Educational Ethnography, Volume 7) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI, pp. 1-8.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘When policy moves fast, how long can ethnography take?’ In Bradley A. U. Levinson, Sandra L. Cade, Ana Padawer and Ana Patricia Elvir (eds.) Ethnography and Education Policy Across the Americas, Westport, CT, Praeger,  pp. 23-38.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘Why don’t we name our research sites?’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Educational Ethnography and Methodology, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 6) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI, pp. 95-105.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘Educational reform and sociology in England and Wales.’ In David L. Levinson, Peter W. Cookson, Jr., and Alan R. Sadovnik (eds.) Education and Sociology: An Encyclopaedia, New York and London, RoutledgeFalmer, pp. 211-219.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘Classification and framing of the curriculum in evangelical Christian and Muslim schools in England and the Netherlands.’ Educational Studies, 28, 4, pp. 403-419.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘Redefining school effectiveness.’ Westminster Studies in Education, 25, 1, pp. 47-58.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘The state and civil society in education in England: past developments and current problems.’ In Heinz-Dieter Meyer and William Lowe Boyd (eds.) Education between State, Markets, and Civil Society: Comparative perspectives, Mahwah, NJ & London, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, pp. 81-100.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Privatization in industrialized countries.’ In Henry M. Levin (ed.) Privatizing Education. Can the marketplace deliver choice, efficiency, equity, and social cohesion? Boulder, CO  & Oxford, Westview Press, pp. 178-200.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘From common schooling to selection? Affirming and contesting the comprehensive ideal, 1976-2001.’ In Robert Phillips and John Furlong (eds.)  Education, Reform and the State: Politics, Policy and Practice 1976-2001 London & New York, RoutledgeFalmer, pp. 45-57.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Introduction: ethnography and policy.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Ethnography and Education Policy, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 4) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI, pp. 1-9.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Durkheim, democracy and diversity: some thoughts on recent changes in England and Wales.’ In W S F Pickering (ed.) Emile Durkheim: Critical Assessments of Leading Sociologists. Volume VI,London & New York, Routledge, pp. 543-559.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Introduction’ (to Education Section). In W S F Pickering (ed.) Emile Durkheim: Critical Assessments of Leading Sociologists. Volume VI, London & New York, Routledge, pp. 365-371.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Funding for religious schools in England and the Netherlands. Can the piper call the tune?’ Research Papers in Education, 16, 4, pp. 359-380.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Evangelical Christian schools in England and the Netherlands.’  Oxford Review of Education, 27, 4, pp. 529-541.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Building identity through communities of practice: Evangelical Christian schools in the Netherlands.’ International Journal of Education and Religion, 2, 2, pp. 126-143.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘The fate of the new Christian schools: from growth to decline?’ Educational Studies,27, 4, pp. 465-477.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Site selection within comparative case-study and ethnographic research.’ Compare, 31, 2, pp.151-164.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Does the market ensure quality?’ Westminster Studies in Education 24, 1, pp. 23-33.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘School choice and social exclusion in England and Wales.’ In John Sayer and Johan Vanderhoven (eds.) School Choice, Equity and Social Exclusion, Leuven, Garant.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘Introduction.’ In Geoffrey Walford and Caroline Hudson (eds.) Genders and Sexualities in Educational Ethnography, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 3) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI/Elsevier.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘First days in the field: gender and sexuality in an evangelical Christian school.’ In Geoffrey Walford and Caroline Hudson (eds.) Genders and Sexualities in Educational Ethnography, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 3) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI/Elsevier.
  • W S F Pickering and Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘Introduction.’ In W. S.F. Pickering and Geoffrey Walford (eds.)Durkheim’s Suicide: a century of research and debate, London & New York, Routledge, pp. 1-10.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘What’s new about academic capitalism’ Learning & Managing, 6, 2, pp. 174-181.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘Government policy on private schooling in England’ Education and Society, 18, 1, pp. 25-43.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘From City Technology Colleges to sponsored grant-maintained schools’ Oxford Review of Education, 26, 2, pp. 145-158.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘A policy adventure: sponsored grant-maintained schools’ Educational Studies, 26, 2, pp. 247-262.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1999) ‘L’enseignement privé en Angleterre: tendances récentes et problèmes soulevés’Carrefours de l’éducation, 8, pp. 126-139.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1999) ‘Selling your way in: gaining access to research sites.’ In Alexander Massey and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) Explorations in Methodology, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 2)  Stamford, CT, JAI Press,  pp. 1-15.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1999) ‘Educating religious minorities within the English state-maintained sector’International Journal of Educational Management, 13, 2, pp. 98-106.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Durkheim, democracy and diversity: some thoughts on recent changes in England.’ In Geoffrey Walford and W. S. F. Pickering (eds.)  Durkheim and Modern Education, London & New York, Routledge, pp. 125-141.
  • W. S. F. Pickering and Geoffrey Walford (1988) ‘Introduction: Durkheim and education.’ In Geoffrey Walford and W. S. F. Pickering (eds.) Durkheim and Modern Education, London & New York, Routledge, pp. 1-16.
  • Alexander Massey and Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Children learning: Ethnographers learning.’ In Geoffrey Walford and Alexander Massey  (eds.) Children Learning in Context, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 1), Stamford, CT & London, JAI Press, pp. 1-18.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Essay review: Is there a ‘new variant’ diploma disease?’ Oxford Review of Education, 24, 3,  pp. 405-409.
  • David Rigoni and Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Questioning the quick-fix: Assertive Discipline and the 1997 Education White Paper’ Journal of Education Policy, 13, 3, pp. 443-452.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Compulsive writing behaviour: getting it published.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Doing Research About Education, London & Washington D.C., Falmer, pp. 184-198.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Research accounts count.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Doing Research About Education, London & Washington, D.C., Falmer, pp. 1-10.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Reading and writing the small print: The fate of sponsored grant-maintained schools.’  Educational Studies, 24, 2, pp. 241-257.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘School choice and the common good: a reply to Brighouse’ Oxford Review of Education, 23, 4, pp. 517-521.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997)  ‘The 14-19 curriculum in private schools.’ In Sally Tomlinson (ed.) Education 14-19: Critical Perspectives, London & Atlantic Highlands, NJ, Athlone, pp. 101-112.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘Diversity, choice and selection in England and Wales’ Educational Administration Quarterly 33, 2, pp. 158-169.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘Sponsored grant-maintained schools: extending the franchise?’ Oxford Review of Education, 23, 1, pp. 31-44.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘Education and private schools.’ In Anthony Giddens (ed.) Sociology: Introductory readings, Cambridge, Polity, pp. 329-336.
  • Steven Carroll and Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘The child’s voice in school choice’ Educational Management and Administration, 25, 2, pp. 169-180.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘Privatization and selection.’ In Richard Pring and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) Affirming the Comprehensive Ideal, London, Falmer.
  • Steven Carroll and Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘Parents’ responses  to the school quasi-market’ Research Papers in Education, 12, 1, pp. 3-26.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘Power and responsibility in pressure group activity.’ In Keith Watson, Sohan Modgil and Celia Modgil (eds.)  Educational Dilemmas: Debate and diversity, London, Cassell,  pp. 247-253 and 264-265.
  • Steven Carroll and Geoffrey Walford (1996) ‘A panic about school choice’ Educational Studies, 22, 3, pp. 393-407.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1996)  ‘School choice and equity in England and Wales’  Oxford Studies in Comparative Education, 6, 1, pp. 49-62.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1996) ‘Diversity and choice in school education: an alternative view’ Oxford Review of Education,  22, 2, pp. 143-154.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1996)  ‘Faith-based grant-maintained schools: Selective international policy borrowing from The Netherlands’ in John Ahier, Ben Cosin and Margaret Hales (eds.) Diversity and Change: Education, policy and selection, London, Routledge, pp. 63-78.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995)  ‘The Northbourne amendments: Is the House of Lords a garbage can?’ Journal of Education Policy, 10 (5) pp. 413-425.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995) ‘Faith-based schools, diversity and inequity.’ In Gwen Wallace (ed.)  Schools, Markets and Management, Bournmouth, Hyde Publications, pp. 13-20.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995) ‘The Christian Schools Campaign – a successful educational pressure group?’ British Educational Research Journal, 21 (4) pp. 451-464.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995)  ‘Faith-based grant-maintained schools: Selective international policy borrowing from The Netherlands.’ Journal of Education Policy, 10 (2) pp. 245-257.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995) ‘Classification and framing in English public boarding schools.’  In Paul Atkinson, Brian Davies and Sara Delamont (eds.) Discourse and Reproduction. Essays in honor of Basil Bernstein, New Jersey, USA, Hampton Press, pp. 191-207.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994)  ‘A return to selection?’ Westminster Studies in Education, 17, pp. 19-30.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994) ‘Political commitment in the study of the City Technology College, Kingshurst.’  In David Halpin and Barry Troyna (eds.) Researching Education Policy: Ethical and Methodological Issues, London, Falmer, pp. 94-106.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994)  ‘The dilemma of choice in education.’ In Ian Lawrence (ed.) Education Tomorrow, London, Cassell, pp. 130-144.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994)  ‘Reflections on researching the powerful.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Researching the Powerful in Education, London, UCL Press, pp. 222-231.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994)  ‘Ethics and power in a study of pressure group politics.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.)Researching the Powerful in Education, London, UCL Press, pp. 81-93.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994) ‘A new focus on the powerful.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Researching the Powerful in Education, London, UCL Press, pp. 2-11.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994) ‘Educational choice, control and inequity.’ In David Scott (ed.) Accountability and Control in Educational Settings, London, Cassell, pp. 73-86.
  • Colin Poyntz and Geoffrey Walford (1994) ‘The new Christian schools: A survey.’  Educational Studies, 20, 1, pp. 127-143.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994) ‘The new religious grant-maintained schools.’ Educational Management and Administration, 22, 2, pp. 123-130.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994)   ‘Weak choice, strong choice and the new Christian schools.’ In J. Mark Halstead (ed.)  Parental Choice and Education: Principles, policies and practice,  London, Kogan Page, pp. 139-150.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1993)  ‘Self-managing schools, choice and equity.’ In John Smyth (ed.) A Socially Critical View of the Self-Managing School, Basingstoke, Falmer, pp. 229-244.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1993)  ‘Selection for secondary schooling.’  In Briefings for the Paul Hamlyn Foundation National Commission on Education,  London, Heinemann, pp. 89-102.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1993) ‘The real lessons in school reform from Britain.’ Educational Policy, 7, 2, pp. 212-222.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1993) ‘Girls’ private schooling: past and present.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) The Private Schooling of Girls: Past and present, London, Woburn Press, pp. 9-32.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1992)  Selection for Secondary Schooling National Commission on Education Briefing Paper No. 7,  October.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1992) ‘Educational reform in the 1980s: National case studies. Great Britain.’ In Peter W. Cookson, Jr., Alan R. Sadovnik and Susan F. Semel (eds.) International Handbook of Educational Reform, Westport, CT, USA, Greenwood Press, pp. 209-227.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1992) ‘Educational choice and equity in Great Britain.’ Educational Policy (USA), 6, (2) pp. 123-138.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1992) ‘The reform of higher education.’ In Madeline Arnot and Len Barton (eds.)  Voicing Concerns: Sociological Perspectives on contemporary educational reforms, Wallingford, Triangle Books, pp. 186-200.
  • Sharon Gewirtz, Henry Miller and Geoffrey Walford (1991) ‘Parents’ individualist and collectivist strategies at the City Technology College, Kingshurst.’ International Studies in Sociology of Education, 1, pp. 173-191.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991)  ‘The changing relationship between government and higher education in Britain.’  In Guy Neave and Frans van Vught (ed.) Prometheus Bound. The changing relationship between government and higher education in Western Europe, Oxford, Pergamon, pp. 165-183.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991) ‘Researching the City Technology College, Kingshurst.’  In Geoffrey Walford (ed.)Doing Educational Research, London, Routledge, pp. 82-100.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991)  ‘Reflexive accounts of doing educational research.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.)  Doing Educational Research, London, Routledge, pp. 1-17.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991)  ‘Choice of school at the first City Technology College.’ Educational Studies, 17, 1, pp. 65-75.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991)  ‘City Technology Colleges: A private magnetism?’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.)  Private Schooling: Tradition, change and diversity, London, Paul Chapman, pp. 158-76.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991) ‘The reluctant private sector: of small schools, people and politics.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Private Schooling: tradition, change and diversity, London Paul Chapman, pp. 115-32.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1990)  ‘Developing choice in British education.’  Compare. A Journal of Comparative Education, 20, 1, pp 22-56.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1990) ‘The 1988 Education Reform Act for England and Wales: Paths to privatization.’ Educational Policy, 4, 2, pp. 127-44.
  • Mark H. Robson and Geoffrey Walford (1989) ‘Independent schools and tax policy under Mrs Thatcher.’ Journal of Education Policy, 4, 2, pp. 149-62.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1989) ‘Scotland: Changes in government policy towards private schools.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.)  Private Schools in Ten Countries: Policy and practice, London, Routledge, pp. 32-56.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1989)  ‘Private schools policy and practice in comparative perspective.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Private Schools in Ten Countries: Policy and practice, London, Routledge, pp. 1-7.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1989)  ‘Bullying in public schools: Myth and reality.’ In Delwyn P. Tattum and David Lane (eds.) Bullying in Schools, London, Trentham Books, pp. 81-88.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1988)  ‘Young people’s views about the Youth Training Scheme in Scotland.’ British Journal of Sociology of Education, 9, 4, pp. 437-51.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1988)  ‘Shouts of joy and cries of pain: investigating young people’s comments on leaving school and entering the labour market.’ In David Raffe (ed.)  Education and the Youth Labour Market: Schooling and scheming, Lewes, Falmer, pp. 243-65.
  • Geoffrey Walford, June Purvis and Andrew Pollard (1988)  ‘Ethnography, policy and the emergence of the new vocationalism.’  In Andrew Pollard, June Purvis and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) Education, Training and the New Vocationalism: Experience and policy, Milton Keynes, Open University Press, pp. 3-14.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1988) ‘Training the elite – for education, training and jobs.’ Collected Original Resources in Education, 12, 1, pp. 1-19.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1988)  ‘The privatisation of British higher education.’ European Journal of Education, 23, 1/2, pp. 47-64.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1988)  ‘The Scottish Assisted Places Scheme. A comparative study of the origins, nature and practice of the APS in Scotland, England & Wales.’ Journal of Education Policy, 3, 2, pp. 137-53.
  • Mark H. Robson and Geoffrey Walford (1988)  ‘U.K. tax policy and independent schools.’ British Tax Review, 2, pp. 38-54.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1987)  ‘How important is the independent sector in Scotland’ Scottish Educational Review, 19, 2, pp. 108-21.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1987)  ‘How dependent is the independent sector?’ Oxford Review of Education, 13, 3, pp. 275-96.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1987)  ‘Research role conflicts and compromises in public schools.’  In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Doing Sociology of Education, Lewes, Falmer, pp. 45-65.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1987)  ‘The research process.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Doing Sociology of Education, Lewes, Falmer, pp. 1-15.
  • Geoffrey Walford and Sïan Jones (1986) ‘The Solihull adventure. An attempt to reintroduce selective education.’  Journal of Education Policy, 1, 3, pp. 239-53.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1986)  ‘Ruling-class classification and framing.’  British Educational Research Journal, 12, 2, pp. 183-95.
  • Henry Miller and Geoffrey Walford (1986) ‘A case study of financial constraints in British universities.’ IHELG Monograph, Number 86/5, Institute for Higher Education Law and Governance, University of Houston, Texas, USA.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1985)  ‘The influence of external pressure groups on the school curriculum: Two examples.’  Collected Original Resources in Education, 9, 2, pp. 1-45.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1985)  ‘The construction of a curriculum area.’ British Journal of Sociology of Education, 6, 2, pp. 155-71.
  • Henry Miller and Geoffrey Walford (1985)  ‘University cut and thrust.’  In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Schooling in Turmoil, Beckenham, Croom Helm, pp. 244-68.
  • Richard Thompson and Geoffrey Walford (1985)  ‘Teachers learning about industry: The two curricula and cultural disadvantage.’  In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Schooling in Turmoil, Beckenham, Croom Helm, pp. 59-83.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1984)  ‘The changing professionalism of public school teachers.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) British Public Schools: Policy and practice, Lewes, Falmer, pp. 111-35.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1984)   ‘The numbering of postgraduate research.’  Higher Education Review, 16, 2, pp. 61-65.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1983)  ‘Science education and sexism in the Soviet Union.’  School Science Review, 85, 2, pp. 213-24.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1983)  ‘Postgraduate education and the student’s contribution to research.’ British Journal of Sociology of Education, 4, 3, pp. 241-54.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1983) ‘Research state and research style: A sociological analysis of postgraduate education.’  Collected Original Resources in Education, 7, 1, pp. 1-108.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1983)  ‘Science textbook images and the reproduction of sexual divisions in society.’ Research in Science and Technological Education, 1, 1, pp. 65-72.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1983)  ‘Parental attitudes and girls in physical science.’ School Science Review, 64, pp. 566-67.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1983)  ‘Girls in boys’ public schools: A prelude to further research.’ British Journal of Sociology of Education, 4, 1, pp. 39-54.
  • Leo Raby and Geoffrey Walford (1981) ‘Job status aspirations and their determinants for middle and lower stream pupils in an urban, multi-racial comprehensive school.’ British Educational Research Journal, 7, 2, pp. 173-81.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1981)  ‘Classification and framing in higher education.’ Studies in Higher Education, 6, 2, pp. 147-58.
  • Leo Raby and Geoffrey Walford (1981) ‘Career related attitudes and their determinants for middle- and low-stream pupils in an urban, multi-racial comprehensive school.’ Research in Education, 25, pp. 19-35.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1980) ‘Why physics students start doctorates.’ Studies in Higher Education, 5, 1, pp. 77-80.

Books

  • Geoffrey Walford (2006) Markets and Equity in Education London, Continuum, ISBN: 0 8264 8735 1.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2005) Private Education: tradition and continuity
    London, Continuum, ISBN: 0 8264 8599 5.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) Doing Qualitative Educational Research: a personal guide to the research process, London, Continuum. ISBN: 0-8264-4701-5,  0-8264-4702-3.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) Policy, Politics and Education – sponsored grant-maintained schools and religious diversity, Aldershot, Ashgate. ISBN: 0-7456-1031-4.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1996) Public School, Japanese edition of Life in Public Schools, translated by Yo Takeuchi. Japan, Sekai Shisosha Kyogakusha. ISBN: 4-7907-0626-5.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995) Educational Politics: Pressure groups and faith-based schools, Aldershot, Avebury, ISBN: 1-85628-907-9.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994) Choice and Equity in Education, London, Cassell, ISBN: 0-304-32775-1,  0-304-32774-3.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1993) Contemporary British Education and Privatization, Japanese edition of Privatization and Privilege in Education with new forward and postscript, translated by Norio Iwahashi, Kyoto, Japan, Houritu-Bunka-sha, ISBN: 4589-01705-9.
  • Geoffrey Walford and Henry Miller (1991) City Technology College, Milton Keynes, Open University Press, ISBN: 0335 09275 6.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1990) Privatization and Privilege in Education, London & New York, Routledge, ISBN: 0415 04247 X,  0415 04248 8.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1987) Restructuring Universities: Politics and power in the management of change, Beckenham, Croom Helm, ISBN: 07099 3694 X.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1986) Life in Public Schools, London, Methuen, ISBN: 0416 37170 1,  0416 37180 9.
  • Richard Thompson and Geoffrey Walford (1983) Teachers into Industry, Birmingham, AEEM, ISBN: 0903 703 14 9.

Edited books

  • Prachi Srivastava and Geoffrey Walford (2018) Non-State Actors in Education in the Global South. London, Routledge. ISBN: 978-1-138-57067-2 (hb), 143 pp.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2016)(ed.) Academies, Free Schools and social Justice (Didcot, Routledge) ISBN 13: 978-1-138-96007-7, 118 pp.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2016)(ed.) Privatization, Education and Social Justice (Didcot, Routledge) ISBN 13: 978-1-138-59439-7, 150 pp.
  • Ian Macpherson, Susan Robertson and Geoffrey Walford (eds.)(2014) Education, Privatisation, and Social Justice: Case studies from Africa, South Asia, and South East Asia (Abingdon, Symposium)
  • Geoffrey Walford, Eric Tucker and Madhu Viswanathan (2010) (eds.) The Sage Handbook of Measurement (London, Sage) ISBN: 978-1-4129-4814-2.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2010) (ed.) Blair’s Educational Legacy? (London, Routledge) ISBN: 0-415-48305-0.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) (ed.) How to do Educational Ethnography, London, Tufnell Press, ISBN: 978-1-872767-92-5 (pb).
  • Martin Forsey, Scott Davies and Geoffrey Walford (2008(eds.) The Globalisation of School VChoice? Abingdon, Symposium Books, ISBN: 978-1-873927-12-0 (pb).
  • Prachi Srivastava and Geoffrey Walford (2007) (eds.) Private Schooling in Less-Economically Developed Countries: Asian and African Perspectives Abingdon, Symposium Books. ISBN: 978-1-873927-85-4 (pb).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2007) (ed.) Methodological Developments in Ethnography (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 12) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, Elsevier.  ISBN: 0-7623-1437-0 (hb).
  • David Phillips and Geoffrey Walford (2006) (eds.) Tracing Education Policy: Selections for the Oxford Review of Education Abingdon, Routledge. ISBN: 0-413-39861-4 (hb).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2006) (ed.) Education and the Labour Government: an evaluation of two termsAbingdon, Routledge. ISBN: 0 415 36870 7 (hb).
  • Geoff Troman, Bob Jeffrey and Geoffrey Walford (2005) (eds.) Methodological issues and practices in Ethnography. (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 11) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, Elsevier.  ISBN: 0-7623-1252-1 (hb).
  • Geoff Troman, Bob Jeffrey and Geoffrey Walford (2004) (eds.) Identity, Agency, and Social Institutions in Educational Ethnography. (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 10) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, Elsevier. ISBN: 0-7623-1144-4 (hb).
  • Bob Jeffrey and Geoffrey Walford (2004) (eds.)Ethnographies of Educational and Cultural Conflicts: Strategies and resolutions. (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 9) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, Elsevier. ISBN: 07623-11126 (hb).
  • Holger Daun and Geoffrey Walford (2004) (eds.) Educational Strategies among Muslims in the Context of Globalization. Leiden, Brill. ISBN: 90-04-13675-4 (hb).
  • Geoffrey Walford and W. S. F. Pickering (2003) (ed.) Durkheim and Modern Education, Japanese Edition. Tokyo, Tokyo Metropolitan University Press. ISBN: 4-88683-496-5 (hb).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) (ed.) British Private Schools: research on policy and practice, London, Woburn Press. ISBN: 0-7130-0228-X,  0-7130-4048-3.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) (ed.) Investigating Educational Policy through Ethnography, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume  Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-1018-9 (hb).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) (ed.) Doing a Doctorate in Educational Ethnography, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 7) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-0906-7 (hb).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) (ed.) Debates and Developments in Ethnographic Methodology, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 6) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-0893-1.
  • Phil Carspecken and Geoffrey Walford (2001) (eds.) Critical Educational Ethnography,
    (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 5) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-0797-8.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) (ed.) Ethnography and Education Policy, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 4) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-0768-4.
  • Geoffrey Walford and Caroline Hudson (2000) (eds.) Genders and Sexualities in Educational Ethnography, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 3) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-0738-2.
  • W. S. F. Pickering and Geoffrey Walford (2000) (eds.) Durkheim’s Suicide: a century of research and debate, London & New York, Routledge. ISBN: 0-415-20582-4.
  • Alexander Massey and Geoffrey Walford (1999) (eds.) Explorations in Methodology, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 2) Stamford, CT, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-0563-0.
  • Geoffrey Walford and Alexander Massey (1998) (eds.) Children Learning in Context, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 1). London & Greenwich, CT, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-76230-436-7.
  • Geoffrey Walford and W. S. F. Pickering (1998) (eds.) Durkheim and Modern Education, London & New York, Routledge. ISBN: 0-415-18168-2.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1998) (ed.) Doing Research about Education, London & Washington D.C., Falmer. ISBN: 0-7507-0782-8,  0-7507-0783-6.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) (ed.) Choice, Diversity and Equity in Secondary Schooling, Special Issue of Oxford Review of Education. ISSN:  0305-4985 .
  • Richard Pring and Geoffrey Walford (1997) (eds.) Affirming the Comprehensive Ideal, London & Washington D.C., Falmer. ISBN: 0-7507-0619-8,  0-7507-0620-1.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1996) (ed.) School Choice and the Quasi-Market, Special Issue of Oxford Studies in Comparative Education, Wallingford, Triangle Books. ISBN: 1-873927-23-1.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995) (ed.) La Otra Cara de la Investigación Educativa, Spanish edition of Doing Educational Research, translated by Javier Orduna Cosmen. Madrid, La Muralla. ISBN: 84-7133-646-4.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994) (ed.) Researching the Powerful in Education, London, UCL Press, ISBN: 1-85728-133-0, 1-85728-134-9.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1993) (ed.) The Private Schooling of Girls: Past and present, London, Woburn Press, ISBN: 0-7130-0186-0.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1992) (ed.) Privatne Skole. Iskustva u deset zemalja, Croatian edition of Private Schools in Ten Countries, translated by Mirna Varlandy Supek, Zagreb, Croatia, EDUCA Publishing House, ISBN: 86-7841-002-7.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991) (ed.) Doing Educational Research, London, Routledge, ISBN: 0415 05289 0,  0415 05290 4.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991) (ed.) Private Schooling: Tradition, change and diversity, London, Paul Chapman, ISBN: 185396 116 7.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1989) (ed.) Private Schools in Ten Countries: Policy and practice, London & New York, Routledge, ISBN: 0415 03464 7.
  • Andrew Pollard, June Purvis and Geoffrey Walford (1988) (eds.) Education, Training and the New Vocationalism: experience and policy, Milton Keynes & Philadelphia, Open University Press, ISBN: 0335 15845 5,  0335 15844 7.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1987) (ed.) Doing Sociology of Education, Lewes & Philadelphia, Falmer, ISBN: 085000 145 6,  085000 146 4.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1985) (ed.) Schooling in Turmoil, Beckenham, Croom Helm, ISBN: 07099 3618 4.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1984) (ed.) British Public Schools: Policy and practice,
    Lewes & Philadelphia, Falmer, ISBN: 0905 273 84 2,  0905 273 83 4.

Anne’s main areas of research in Mathematics Education are exemplification and task design in mathematics teaching and learning, from a variation theory perspective; the role of mathematics education in social justice issues; the use of fine-grained approaches to analysis of mathematics interaction within socio-cultural perspectives and the school mathematics curriculum.

Detailed information, papers, presentations and activities can be found on her website at pmtheta.com and on researchgate.net.

Anne convened and co-edited an Study on Task Design for the International Committee on Mathematics Education and has co-authored a book about learning key ideas in secondary mathematics – Key Ideas in Teaching Mathematics for Oxford University Press.

Her most recent publication is the book: Care in Mathematics Education published by Palgrave-Macmillan.

She is a member of the Association of Teachers of Mathematics (ATM), the British Society for Research into the Learning of Mathematics, the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education and the Higher Education Academy and the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group. She is a Fellow of the International Society for Design and Development in Education.  In retirement she runs, with her husband John Mason, free workshops for teachers and others on key conceptual themes that run throughout mathematics (see pmtheta@home on pmtheta.com).

Anne is a member of the Quaker Values in Education Group of the Society of Friends, see: Rowe, D. and Watson, A. (eds.) (2018)  Faith and Experience in Education: essays on Quaker perspectives. London: Trentham Press.

Activities in curriculum
  • Two syntheses of research about how children learn mathematics for the Nuffield Foundation: Key Understandings in Learning Mathematics (with Nunes and Bryant) and Key Ideas in Teaching Mathematics (with Jones and Pratt).
  • Member of the expert drafting panel for the primary and secondary mathematics National Curriculum for the Department for Education.
  • Curriculum Advisor to the Welsh Assembly.
Publications
Selected recent papers
  • Biza, I., Hewitt, A., Watson, A., Mason, J. (2019) Generalization Strategies in Finding the nth Term Rule for Simple Quadratic Sequences. International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, (), 1-22 DOI 10.1007/s10763-019-10009-0
  • Venkat, H., Askew, M., Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2019) Architecture of Mathematical Structure. FLM 39(1), 19-23.
  • Biza, I., Hewitt, A., Watson, A., Mason, J. (2019) Generalization Strategies in Finding the nth Term Rule for Simple Quadratic Sequences. International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, (), 1-22 DOI 10.1007/s10763-019-10009-0
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018) A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice.  73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • Al-Murani, T., Kilhamn, C., Morgan, D., & Watson, A. (2018). Opportunities for learning: the use of variation to analyse examples of a paradigm shift in teaching primary mathematics in England. Research in Mathematics Education, 1-19.
  • Watson, A., Ayalon, M., & Lerman, S. (2018). Comparison of students’ understanding of functions in classes following English and Israeli national curricula. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 97(3), 255-272.
  • Ayalon, M., Watson, A. & Lerman, S. (2016) Students’ conceptualisations of function revealed through definitions and examples. Research in Mathematics Education. 19(1), 1-19
  • Watson, A. (2016) Pedagogy of variations: synthesis of various notions of variation pedagogy in Huang, R. & Li, Y. (eds.) Teaching and learning mathematics through variation. p85-105. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers
  • Ayalon, M., Watson, A. & Lerman, S. (2016) Reasoning about variables in 11 to 18 year olds: informal, schooled and formal expression in learning about functions. Mathematics Education Research Journal. 28(3), 379-404.
  • Ayalon, M., Watson, A., & Lerman, S. (2015). Progression Towards Functions: Students’ Performance on Three Tasks About Variables from Grades 7 to 12. International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, 90(3), 321-339
  • Ayalon, M., Watson, A. and Lerman, S. (2015) Functions represented as linear sequential data: relationships between presentation and student responses Educational Studies in Mathematics.Online DOI 10.1007/s10649-015-9628-9
  • Watson, A. and Ohtani, M. (2015) Themes and issues in mathematics education concerning task design: Editorial introduction. In Watson, A. and Ohtani, M. (eds.) Task Design in Mathematics Education: An ICMI study.  (pp. 3-18 ) Heidelberg: Springer
  • Watson, A. and Thompson, D. (2015) Design issues related to text-based tasks. In Watson, A. and Ohtani, M. (eds.) Task Design in Mathematics Education: An ICMI study.  (pp.143-190) Heidelberg: Springer.
  • Watson, A., De Geest, E. (2014) Department-initiated change. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(3), 351-368.
Selected Books
  • Watson, A. (2021) Care in Mathematics Education: Alternative educational spaces and practices. Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Watson, A. (ed.) (2018) Variation in mathematics: A collection of writings from ATM Mathematics Teaching. Association of Teachers of Mathematics, Derby, UK.
  • Watson, A. and Ohtani, M. (2015) (Eds.) Task Design in Mathematics Education: An ICMI study.  Heidelberg: Springer.
  • Watson, A.,  Jones, K. and Pratt, D. (2013)  Key Ideas in Teaching Mathematics: Research-based guidance for ages 9-19 (Oxford University Press + Nuffield website)
  • Watson and P. Winbourne (eds.) (2007) New Directions for Situated Cognition in Learning Mathematics, pub. Springer
  • Watson, A. (2006) Raising Achievement in Secondary Mathematics Maidenhead, Open University Press
  • Watson, A. and Mason, J. (2005) Mathematics as a constructive activity: learners generating examples. Lawrence Erlbaum Publishers.

David Phillips is Emeritus Professor of Comparative Education, and Emeritus Fellow of St Edmund Hall.

A linguist by origin, David Phillips now works exclusively on various aspects of comparative and international education, with a particular focus on policy issues in historical context. He is the author of many publications, especially on education in Germany (more particularly in the post-war and post-unification periods) and on policy ‘borrowing’ in education. He has edited  Comparative Education, Research in Comparative and International Education, and the Oxford Review of Education and  and serves on the editorial boards of various other journals; he also edits the book series Oxford Studies in Comparative Education. He is co-chair of the Anglo-German Educational Research Group (www.aerg.org)

He has been Chair of the British Association for Comparative and International Education (BAICE). In 1990-91 he served on a commission of the German Wissenschaftsrat which reported to the German government on the future of teacher education in the territory of the former German Democratic Republic, and he has (2003-4) been a member of a commission appointed by the Minister for Science, Culture and the Arts in Baden-Württemberg with the task of evaluating educational studies in higher education in that state of the Federal Republic of Germany. He has evaluated projects for the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft and for other research bodies. He is a Fellow of the Social Sciences Academy and a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society.

Professor Phillips’s main teaching involved theoretical and methodological issues in comparative education, educational policy in Western Europe (particularly EU countries) and in Eastern Europe, in Japan, and in the United States. Many of his doctoral students focused on education in Germany and Japan, and on a range of topics involving education and training policy in the European Union as well as on aspects of educational policy borrowing in a variety of contexts.

Publications
  • Zur Universitätsreform in der Britischen Besatzungszone 1945-1948, Böhlau 1983
  • (Editor): Hochschuloffiziere und Wiederaufbau des Hochschulwesens in Westdeutschland 1945-1952, Teil 1: Die Britische Zone, Lax, 1990
  • (Editor): Lessons of Cross-National Comparison in Education, Triangle Books, 1992
  • (Editor, with Michael Kaser): Education and Economic Change in Eastern Europe, Triangle Books, 1992
  • Pragmatismus und Idealismus: Das ‘Blaue Gutachten’ und die Britische Hochschulpolitik in Deutschland 1948, Böhlau, 1995
  • (Editor, with others): Education for Reconstruction, Symposium Books, 1998
  • (Editor): Education in Germany: Tradition and Reform in Historical Context, Routledge, 1995
  • (Editor, with Michael Kaser): Aspects of Education and the European Union, Triangle Books, 1995
  • (Editor, with others): Learning From Comparing: New Directions in Comparative Educational Research , Vol. 1, Contexts, Classrooms and Outcomes, Symposium Books, 1999 (with Robin Alexander and Patricia Broadfoot); Vol.2, Policy, Professionals and Development,: Symposium Books, 2000 (with Robin Alexander and Marilyn Osborn)
  • (Editor): Education in Eastern Germany Since Unification, Symposium Books, 2000
  • ‘Reconstructing Education in Germany: Some Similarities and Contrasts in the Post-War and Post-Unification Rethinking in Educational Provision’, in: Leslie J. Limage (ed): Democratizing Education and Educating Democratic Citizens: International and Historical Perspectives, New York (Routledge/Falmer), 2001
  • ‘Helena Deneke and the Women of Germany. A Note on Post-War Reconstruction’, German Life and Letters, Vol.53 No.1, 2000
  • Reflections on British Interest in Education in Germany in the Nineteenth Century. (A Progress Report), Educa, Lisbon, 2002
  • ‘Comparative Historical Studies in Education: Problems of Periodisation Reconsidered’, British Journal of Educational Studies, Vol.50, No.3, 2002
  • ‘Beyond Travellers’ Tales: Some Nineteenth-Century British Commentators on Education in Germany’, Oxford Review of Education, Vol.26 No.1, 2000
  • ‘Comparative Studies and “Cross-National Attraction” in Education: a typology for the analysis of English interest in educational policy and provision in Germany, Educational Studies, Vol.28, No.4, 2002 (with Kimberly Ochs)
  • ‘Processes of Policy Borrowing in Education: Some Explanatory and Analytical Devices, (with Kimberly Ochs), Comparative Education, Vol. 39, No.4, 2003
  • (Editor, with Roger Goodman): Can the Japanese Change Their Education System? Symposium Books, 2003
  • (Editor, with Hubert Ertl): Implementing European Union Education and Training Policy: A Comparative Study of Issues in Four Member States, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2003
  • Articles on ‘Helena Deneke’, ‘Evelyn Spearing’, and ‘Edith Wardale’, New Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004
  • ‘Researching Policy Borrowing: Some Methodological Problems in Comparative Education’, British Educational Research Journal, Vol.30 No.6, 2004 (with Kimberly Ochs)
  • ‘A Typology of Cross-National Attraction in Education’, in: Gita Steiner-Khamsi (ed.): The Global Politics of Educational Borrowing and Lending, Teachers College Press, 2004
  • (Editor, with Kimberly Ochs): Educational Policy Borrowing: Historical Perspectives, Symposium Books, 2004
  • ‘Policy Borrowing in Education: Frameworks for Analysis’, in: Joseph Zajda (ed.): International Handbook on Globalisation, Education and Policy Research: Global Pedagogies and Policies, Springer, 2005
  • ‘Comparative Education: An Approach to Educational Inquiry’, in: Clifton Conrad and Ronald Serlin (eds.): The Sage Handbook on Research in Education: Engaging Ideas and Enriching Inquiry, Sage, 2005
  • ‘Michael Sadler and Comparative Education’, Oxford Review of Education, Vol. 32, No.1, 2006
  • Comparative and International Education: An Introduction to Theory, Method and Practice, Continuum, 2006 (with Michele Schweisfurth)
  • (Editor): Special issue of Comparative Education on ‘Mapping EU Education and Training Policy’, Vol.42, No.1, 2006
  • (Editor): Special issue of Oxford Review of Education on ‘Comparative Inquiry and Educational Policy Making’, Vol.42, No.3, 2006
  • The German Example: English Interest in Educational Provision in Germany Since 1800, Continuum 2011
  • ‘Aspects of Education for Democratic Citizenship in Post-War Germany, Oxford Review of Education, Vol.38, No.6, 2012
  • Investigating Education in Germany: Historical Studies from a British Perspective, Routledge 2015
  • Educating the Germans. People and Policy in the British Zone of Germany, 1945-1949, 2018
Research

David Phillips’s main research interests are in education in Germany, transition in education in eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, educational policy ‘borrowing’, theoretical perspectives in comparative education, and EU education and training policy.

Much of David Phillips’s recent research has been in the area of educational policy borrowing and in EU education and training policy. He recently (1998-2002 inclusive) directed a five-year EU-funded project (PRESTIGE – ‘Problems of Educational Standardisation and Transition in a Global environment’) in this latter area, and oversaw and contributed to the many publications which emerged from the project. Currently the focus of his work is on British interest in educational provision in Germany over the past 200 years. In 2005, together with Alis Oancea, he organised an international seminar funded by the European Science Foundation on the subject ‘15 Years On: Post-communist transitions and European integration of central and eastern European Countries’.

One of his recent books is The German Example: English Interest in Educational Provision in Germany Since 1800 (Continuum,2011), and he has most recently published Educating the Germans, a study of British educational policy in occupied Germany, 1945-1949.  The research for this book was supported by a Leverhulme Trust Emeritus Fellowship awarded in 2012. In 2015 Routledge published Investigating Education in Germany: Historical Studies from a British Perspective. 

Professor of Sociology of Education in the Department of Education from 2010-2015, and before that Director of the Centre for Educational Sociology (CES), University of Edinburgh, Jenny also worked at Strathcyde, Keele, UWE Bristol, and the Open University.

She is an Honorary Professorial Visiting Fellow in the School of Social and Political Sciences, the University of Edinburgh, and has an attachment to the University of Umea, Sweden. She is a Fellow of the British Academy and has been a visiting scholar at Helsinki University, Finland. She holds an honorary doctorate from Turku University, Finland and is a member of the ESF College of Expert Reviewers. She teaches on the EU funded summer school in European Education Studies (SUSEES). The MOOC may be accessed here http://www.susees.eu/mooc-2017-lecture-2-governing-education-europe-changing-role-knowledge/

Research

Jenny’s most recent funded research was a Leverhulme Emeritus Fellowship, on Governing Education: knowledge and policy in England and Scotland since 1986. The study investigates the changing relationship between knowledge and policy in governing education in the period 1986-2015 in England and Scotland.

Jenny also continues to research and publish on education policy with a focus on governance and governing, through investigation of the resources that are being mobilized by new governing forms and through new policy technologies. She works in collaboration with colleagues in the UK and Europe, located in a variety of disciplines-including political science and social policy.

Publications
Recent books
  • Ozga, J (2016) (ed) Sage Library of Educational Thought and Practice: Sociology of Education (four volumes)
  • Fenwick. T., Mangez, E., and Ozga.J. (Eds) (2014) Governing Knowledge: Comparison, Knowledge-Based Technologies and Expertise in the Regulation of Education, (World Yearbook of Education 2014) London, Routledge
  • 2011: Fabricating Quality in Europe: data and education governance (edited with Peter Dahler-Larsen, Christina Segerholm and Hannu Simola London, Routledge
  • 2007: Lingard, B and Ozga, J (eds) The Routledge Reader in Education Policy and Politics, London, Routledge.
  • 2006: Ozga, J. Seddon T and Popkewitz T.S. (eds) Research and Policy: steering the knowledge-based Economy (World Yearbook of Education 2006) London, Routledge
Recent articles
  • Ozga, Jenny (2021) Problematising policy: the development of (critical) policy sociology, Critical Studies in Education, 62:3, 290-305, DOI: 10.1080/17508487.2019.1697718
  • Ozga, Jenny (2021) Who governs? Political leadership in transnational times, School Leadership & Management, 41:1-2, 6-21, DOI: 10.1080/13632434.2020.1789857
  • Ozga, Jenny (2020) The politics of accountability. Journal of Educational Change 21, 19–35 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10833-019-09354-2
  • Ozga, Jenny, & Arnott, M. A. (2019). Governando para além do PISA: conhecimento, redes e narrativas. [Governing Beyond PISA: knowledge, networks and narratives] Roteiro,44(3), 1-22. https://doi.org/10.18593/r.v44i3.21004
  • Ozga, J (2017) ‘Education policy should not be driven by performance data’ Nature: Human Behaviour Vol 1 Issue 1 http://www.nature.com/articles/s41562-016-0014
  • Ozga, Jenny (2016) Trust in numbers? Digital Education Governance and the inspection process  European Educational Research Journal Vol. 15(1) 69–81
  • Margaret Arnott & Jenny Ozga (2016) Education and nationalism in Scotland: governing a ‘learning nation’, Oxford Review of Education, 42:3, 253-265, DOI: 10.1080/03054985.2016.1184865
  • Ozga J and Lawn, M (2014) Frameworks of Regulation: Evidence, Knowledge and Judgement in Inspection Introduction to Special issue of Sisyphus, Journal of Education Volume 2 Issue 1 pp 7-16 (available at http://revista.rcap.pt/sisyphus)
  • Ozga, J (2014) Knowledge, Inspection and the Work of Governing Special issue of Sisyphus, Journal of Education Volume 2 Issue 1 pp16-40 (available at http://revista.rcap.pt/sisyphus)
  • Ozga, J and Lawn, M (2014) Inspectorates and Politics-the trajectories of inspection in England and Scotland  Revue Francaise de Pedagogie 186 pp11-23
  • Ozga, J Baxter, J, Clarke, J. Grek, S and Lawn M (2013) ‘The Politics of Educational Change: Governing and School Inspection in England and Scotland’ Swiss Journal of Sociology 39(2) 205-224.
  • Ozga J (2013) ‘Accountability as a Policy Technology: accounting for education performance in Europe’ International Review of Administrative Science 79 (2) 292-309.
  • Grek, S Lawn, M Ozga, J and Segerholm, C (2013) ‘Governing by Inspection? European Inspectorates and the creation of a European Education Policy Space Comparative Education, 49 (4) 486-502
  • Grek S and Ozga J (2012) Governing through Learning: School Self-Evaluation as a Knowledge-based Regulatory Tool. Recherches sociologiques et anthropologiqes 2012/2 83-103
  • Ozga J (2012) ‘Governing knowledge: data, inspection and education policy in Europe’ Globalisation, Societies and Education
  • Ozga J (2011) Knowledge Stocks and Flows: Data and Education Governance in Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities (Eds) Tara Fenwick and Lesley Farrell, London Routledge
  • Ozga J (2011) Governing Narratives: ‘local’ meanings and globalising education policy Education Inquiry 2 (2) June pp 305-318
  • Ozga J (2011) ‘Knowledge Transfer and Transformation: moving knowledge from research to policy’  PERSPECTIVA, Florianópolis, v. 29, n. 1, 49-67, jan./jun. 2011
  • Ozga J (2011) Researching the Powerful: Seeking Knowledge about Policy European Educational Research Journal Volume 10 Number 2 2011 pp 218-224
  • Arnott, M.A. & Ozga, J. (2010) ‘Nationalism, Governance and Policy Making: The SNP in Power’ Public Money and Management, vol.30 no.2 pp.91-97
  • Arnott, M. and Ozga J. (2010) Education and Nationalism: the discourse of education policy in Scotland Discourse 31(3 ) 335-350
  • Grek S and Ozga J (2010) Governing Education through Data: Scotland, England and the European Education Policy Space British Education Research Journal 36 (6) 937-952
  • Grek, S. and Ozga, J. (2010) ‘Re-inventing Public Education: the new role of knowledge in education policy-making’, Public Policy and Administration 25 (3) 271-288
  • Ozga, J. (2009) Governing Education through Data in England: From Regulation to Self-Evaluation, Special Issue of Journal of Education Policy, 24(2) 149-163
  • Grek, S.,Lawn M, Lingard, B Ozga, J. Rinne, R., Segerholm, C.and Simola, H. (2009) ‘National policy brokering and the construction of the European Education Space in England, Sweden, Finland and Scotland’  Comparative Education 45(1) 5-22
  • Ozga J (2008) Governing Knowledge: research steering and research quality, European  Educational Research Journal, 7(3), pp.261-272.
  • Byrne D and Ozga J (2008) Education Research and Policy Research Papers in Education, 23(4), pp.377-407
  • Ozga, J (2007) Knowledge and Policy: Research and Knowledge Transfer Critical Studies in Education 48 (1) pp63-78
Recent book chapters
  • Ozga, Jenny (2020) Elites and Expertise: The Changing Material Production of Knowledge for Policy in Fan, Guorui and Popkewitz, Thomas (Eds.) Handbook of Education Policy Studies volume 1 Values, Governance, Globalization, and Methodology (https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9789811383465)
  • Ozga, J (2019) ‘Governing and Knowledge: Theorising the Relationship’ in Langer, R and Brusemeister, T Handbuch Educational Governance Theorien Springer
  • Ozga J (2017) ‘Education and Nationalism in Scotland: nationalism as a governing resource’ in Kantasalmi, K and Holm, G (eds) The State, Schooling and Identity Singapore, Palgrave Macmillan/Springer
  • Ozga, Jenny (2015) Working Knowledge: Data, Expertise and Inspection in the Governing of Education in Kotthoff H-G and Klerides, E (eds) Governing Educational Spaces Knowledge, Teaching, and Learning in Transition Rotterdam, Sense Publishers  pp 15-35 https://www.sensepublishers.com/media/2526-governing-educational-spaces.pdf
  • Ozga J and Dubois-Shaik F (2015) ‘Referencing Europe:usages  of Europe in National Identity Projects’ in Carter, C and Lawn, M (eds) Governing Europe’s Spaces: European Union Re-imagined Manchester, Manchester University Press
  • Ozga J and Segerholm C (2015) Neo-Liberal Agendas in Education in Grek, S and Lindgren, J (eds) Governing by Inspection Routledge pp27-38
  • Ozga J, Lawn M (2015) The History and Development of Inspectorates in England, Sweden and Scotland in Grek, S and Lindgren, J (eds) Governing by Inspection Routledge pp58-74
  • Lawn M and Ozga J (2012) Making Good Progress? Governing by Inspection: a post-comparative approach. Helsinki, Finnish Education Research Association.
  • Arnott M and Ozga J  (2012) ‘Education, Nationalism and Social Justice in Scott, G. & Mooney, G. (eds) Social Justice and Social Policy: the Politics of Social Policy in Scotland, Bristol, Policy Press
  • Ozga J (2012) ‘Trans-national Technologies and National Contexts: a Comparative Analysis of Education Policy in Scotland and England’ in Kauko, J Rinne R & Kynkäänniemi H (eds) Restructuring the Truth of Schooling – Essays on Discursive Practices in Sociology and the Politics of Education Helsinki, Finnish Educational Research Association
  • Arnott m and Ozga J (2010) ‘Education Policy & the SNP Government’ in Scott, G. & Mooney, G. (eds) (2010) Politics of Social Policy in Scotland, Policy Press

Ian is former President of BERA, 2013-2015. At OUDE he was Director of Professional Programmes and led the development of the Oxford Education Deanery.Before moving to Oxford, Ian was Professor of Teacher Education at the University of Glasgow. Prior to that he held posts at the University of the West of Scotland (Dean of Education and Media), London Metropolitan University (Head of School of Education), University of the West of England and the University of Gloucestershire.

Ian was President of the Scottish Educational Research Association from 2005–07 and chaired the Research and Development Committee of the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers from 2008-11. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts and is a Visiting Professor at Bath Spa University and Ulster University and an Honorary Professor at the University of Exeter. Since 2018 he has been a Senior Research Associate at Kazan Federal University, Russia.

Publications
Books
  • Menter, I., Muschamp, Y., Nicholls, P., Ozga, J. with Pollard, A. (1997) Work and Identity in the Primary School: A Post-Fordist Analysis Buckingham: Open University Press
  • Menter, I., Brisard, E. and Smith, I. (2006) Convergence or Divergence?: Initial teacher education in Scotland and England Edinburgh: Dunedin Academic Press.
  • Menter, I. and Murray, J. (eds.) (2011) Developing Research in Teacher Education, London: Routledge.
  • Menter, I., Elliot, D., Hulme, M., Lewin, J. and Lowden, K. (2011) A Guide to Practitioner Research in Education, London: Sage.
  • The Teacher Education Group (2015) Teacher Education in Times of Change. Bristol: Policy Press.
  • Peters, M., Cowie, B and Menter, I. (eds.) (2017) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education Research. Singapore: Springer.
  • Childs, A. and Menter, I. (eds.) (2018) Mobilising Teacher Researchers: challenging educational inequality. London: Routledge
  • Tatto, M.T. and Menter, I. (eds.) (2019) Knowledge, Policy and Practice in Teacher Education – A Cross-National Study. London: Bloomsbury.
Recent research reports
  • 2009 Final Report Curriculum for Excellence Draft Experiences and Outcomes: Collection, analysis and reporting of data for Learning and Teaching Scotland (Menter, I., Baumfield, V., Hulme, M., Devlin, A., Ellott, D., Hall, J., Hall, S. and Lowden, K.)
  • 2010 ‘Teachers: formation, training and identity’ (A literature review for Culture, Creativity and Education) (Menter, I.)
  • 2010 Literature Review on Teacher Education in the 21stCentury, Edinburgh: The Scottish Government. (Menter, I.,Hulme, M., Elliot, D. and Lewin, J.)
  • 2010 Research to support Schools of Ambition: Final Report, Edinburgh: The Scottish Government (Menter, I., Hulme, M., Christie, D., Payne, F., Coutts, N., Robson, D. and Spratt, J.)
  • 2011 Research to support Schools of Ambition: Final Report, Edinburgh: The Scottish Government (Menter, I., Hulme, M., Christie, D., Payne, F., Coutts, N., Robson, D. and Spratt, J.)
  • 2011 The Glasgow West Teacher Education Initiative: A Clinical Approach to Teacher Education. Evaluation Report. (Menter. I., Baumfield, V., Carroll, M., Dickson, B., Hulme, M., Lowden, K. and Mallon, W.) University of Glasgow.
  • 2012 The Glasgow West Teacher Education Initiative: Evaluation of second phase. Menter, I. and Lowden, K. Glasgow: The University of Glasgow.
  • 2013 Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools, funded by Citi Foundation (Aexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. and Menter, I.)
  • 2017 The role and contribution of higher education in contemporary teacher education. (Menter, I.) Commissioned by the Scottish Council of Deans of Education.
Recent book chapters
  • Menter, I. (2016) Teacher education – making connections with curriculum, pedagogy and assessment. In: Wyse, D., Hayward, L. and Pandya, J. (Eds.) The Sage Handbook of Curriculum, Pedagogy and Assessment. London: SAGE. pp 1015-1028.
  • Menter, I. (2016) ‘Foreword’ to Beckett, L. Teachers and Academic Partners in Urban Schools. London: Routledge.
  • Menter, I. and Walker, M. (2016) ‘School and society’ in Wyse, D. and Rogers, S. (Eds.) A Guide to Early Years and Primary Teaching. London: Sage.
  • Menter, I. (2016) Teacher education: generator of change or a mechanism for conformity? in Lees, H. and Noddings, N. (eds.) The Palgrave International Handbook of Alternative Education. London: Palgrave. 257-272.
  • Menter, I. (2017) ‘Reasons for education research’. In Wyse, D., Selwyn, N., Smith, E. and Suter, L. (Eds.) The BERA/SAGE Handbook of Educational Research. London: Sage. pp. 37-52.
  • Menter, I. (2017) ‘Diversity, development, devolution: the three Ds of UK teacher education and professional development in the twenty-first century’. In Florian, L. and Pantic, N. (Eds.) Teacher Education for the Changing Demographics of Schooling – Issues for research and practice. Cham, Switzerland: Springer. pp39-51.
  • Menter, I. (2017) ‘Teacher Education Research’ In Oxford Encyclopedia of Education. Oxford University Press. DOI: 10.1093/acrefore/9780190264093.013.275
  • Menter, I. (2018) ‘Teacher education in a crucible of change’ in Smith, L. and Wyatt, C. (Eds.) Innovation and Accountability in Teacher Education: Setting directions for new cultures in teacher education. Singapore: Springer. pp313-326.
  • Menter, I. and Reynolds, K. (2019) ‘Diversity in Teacher Education: Afterword’ In Sorensen, N. (Ed.) Diversity in Teacher Education. London: UCL IoE Books.
Recent journal articles
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. and Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: The Development of the Oxford Education Deanery Narrative. Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373.
  • Menter, I. (2015) Unity or disunity in the United Kingdom? Policy and practice in teacher education. Education and Self-Development. 2 (44),156-164.
  • Thompson, I., McNicholl, J. and Menter, I. (2016) Student teachers’ perceptions of poverty and educational achievement, Oxford Review of Education 42, 2, 214-229 DOI: 10.1080/03054985.2016.1164130
  • Menter, I. (2016) Helga Eng lecture 2015: What is a teacher in the 21st century and what does a 21st century teacher need to know? Acta Didactica Norge,10, 2, 11-25.
  • Lynch, D., Smith, R. and Menter, I. (2016) Reforming teacher education: from partnership to ‘syndication’. International Journal of Innovation, Creativity and Change. www.ijicc.net Volume 2, Issue 3.
  • Mutton, T., Burn, K. and Menter, I. (2017) Deconstructing the Carter Review: Competing conceptions of quality in England’s ‘school-led’ system of initial teacher education. Journal of Education Policy. 32, 1, 14-33. DOI: 10.1080/02680939.2016.1214751
  • Menter, I. (2017) Competences and Standards for Teachers and Teacher Education – Developments and Problems – a common approach for the United Kingdom? 26th Bulletin of the Japanese Society for the Study of Teacher Education. 8-19.
  • Menter, I., Valeeva, R. and Kalimullin, A. (2017) A tale of two countries – forty years on: politics and teacher education in Russia and England. European Journal of Teacher Education. 40, 5, 616-629.
  • Whiting, C., Whitty, G., Menter, I., Black, P., Hordern, J., Parfitt, A., Reynolds, K. and Sorenson, N. (2018) Diversity and Complexity: Becoming a teacher in England in 2015-16. Review of Education 6, 1, 69-96.
  • Menter, I. (2018) Defining teachers’ professional knowledge: the interaction of global and national influences. Education and Self-Development.13, 1, 32-42.
  • Loughran, J. and Menter, I. (2019) The essence of being a teacher educator and why it matters, Asia-Pacific Journal of Teacher Education, DOI:10.1080/1359866X.2019.1575946
Research and professional activity

Ian’s research interests are in teacher education and teachers’ work, with a particular interest in policy. He has carried out a number of ‘home international’ comparative studies within the UK, including ESRC-sponsored initiatives and has led projects commissioned by the Scottish Government and The National College for School Leadership. He led a research support team from OUDE working on the National College for Teaching and Leadership project, Closing the Gap – Test and Learn. He was also Director of the Oxford City Council funded Leadership for Learning project, working in city primary schools.

Ian is a founding editor of Review of Education, a journal of the British Educational Research Association, launched in 2013. He is series editor for Critical Guides for Teacher Educators, published by Critical Publishing. He is a founder member of two UK-wide research groups, TEG (Teacher Education Group) and CAPeR-UK (Curricululum, Assessment and Pedagogy Reform across the UK), as well as the OUDE –led research group on Poverty and Teacher Education. He was also a member of the steering group for the BERA-RSA Inquiry into Research and Teacher Education.

Ken Mayhew is Emeritus Professor of Education and Economic Performance and Emeritus Fellow of Pembroke College, Oxford.

He is an Extraordinary Professor at Maastricht University, a Director of the Centre for Tutorial Teaching and has recently finished a term as a member of the Department for Education’s Skills and Productivity Board. He was the founding Director of SKOPE, a multi-disciplinary centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, based in the Oxford Department of Education.
Ken is also currently a member of the ESRC’s College of Peer Reviewers; the Expert Group for CEDEFOP’s European Training and Learning Survey; the Expert Working Group for Cedefop’s Second European Skills and Jobs Survey; Bright Blue’s Commission on the Welfare System after the COVID 19 Pandemic. He is an editor of Oxford Economic Papers

Ken obtained a First in Modern History at Worcester College, Oxford and took a Masters in Economics at LSE. After graduate school he joined Her Majesty’s Treasury before moving to Oxford. In 1989 and 1990 he was Economic Director at the UK National Economic Development Office, and has worked as a consultant for many private and public sector organisations at home and abroad. In the UK these include the Department of Education and Skills, the Department of Trade and Industry, DEFRA, the Skills Funding Agency, the CIPD and the Confederation of British Industry. Abroad they include the EU, the Polish, Belgian and Omani Governments, SIK (Sweden) and Group Training Australia. He was on the Academic Advisory Board of the National Skills Taskforce and Chair of an expert group advising the OECD on the background questionnaire for PIAAC. His major research interests are in labour economics, human resource management and the economics of education and training. He has published widely in these areas.

Ken Mayhew would welcome informal contacts from prospective students interested in the following topics:

• The economics of education
• Transitions from the education system to the labour market
• Work-based training and learning
• Education and social mobility
• The labour market

Research

Ken’s current research is mainly in six areas: transitions from education into the labour market; the economics of work-based training; the economics of higher education; low paid work in the UK and Europe; the labour market as a social model; inequality with special emphasis on regional inequality.

Featured publications
  •  Oxford Handbook of Skills and Training, Oxford University Press, 2017 (with J. Buchanan, D. Finegold and C. Warhurst)
  • “Educating for a cooperative society –building human and social capital: the role of government” in G. Redding, A. Drew and S. Crump (eds), The Oxford Handbook of Higher Education Systems and University Management, 2019
  • “Inequality”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 2019 (with S. Wills)
  • Holmes, C, Mayhew, K (2016) “The economics of higher education”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 32(4) 475-496.
  • Mayhew, K, Holmes, C (2015) Over-qualification and skills mismatch in the graduate labour market. London: CIPD.
  • Mayhew, K (2015) “UK labour market policy then and now”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy.
  • “BREXIT and higher education” (2022) Oxford Review of Economic Policy
  • “What accounts for changes in the chances of being NEET in the UK?” (2021) Journal of Education and Work (with C. Holmes and E. Murphy)
  • Higher education and the labour market” (2020) Oxford Review of Education (with H. Lauder)
Books
  • Oxford Handbook of Skills and Training, Oxford University Press, paperback edition 2018 (with J. Buchanan, D. Finegold and C. Warhurst)
  • Oxford Handbook of Skills and Training, Oxford University Press, 2017 (with J. Buchanan, D. Finegold and C. Warhurst)
  • Appelbaum, E, Bosch, G, Gautié, J, Mason, G, Mayhew, K, Salverda, W, Schmitt, J, Westergaard-Nielsen, N (2010) Introduction and overview.
  • LLoyd, C, Mason, G, Mayhew, K (2008) Low-Wage Work in the United Kingdom. Russell Sage Foundation.
  • Grip, AD, Loo, JV, Mayhew, K (2002) The Economics of Skills Obsolescence Theoretical Innovations and Empirical Applications. Jai.
  • Mayhew, K, Fenn, P, McGuire, A (1994) Providing Health Care. Oxford: OUP.
  • Mayhew, K, Layard, R, Owen, G (1994) Britain’s Training Deficit. Avebury Publishing.
  • Bowen, A, Mayhew, K (1991) Reducing Regional Inequalities.
  • Fenn, P, McGuire, A, Mayhew, K (1991) Providing Health Care. Oxford: OUP.
  • Bowen, A, Mayhew, K (1990) Improving Incentives for the Low-Paid. Springer.
  • Mayhew, K (1983) Trade Unions and the Labour Market. Blackwell Pub.
  • Robinson, DJS, Mayhew, K (1983) Pay policies for the future.
Book chapters
  • “NEETS in England”, in M. Levels, C. Brzinsky-Fay, C. Holmes and J. Jongbloed (eds), The Dynamics of Marginalised Youth, Routledge, 2022 (with C. Holmes, L. Wright, E. Murphy, E. Keep and S. Maguire)
  • “Derek Robinson” in R. Cord (ed), The Palgrave Companion to Oxford Economics, Palgrave, 2021
  • “What, if anything, can we learn from Germany, Switzerland, Austria, the Netherlands and Denmark?”, in D. Goodhart (ed.), The Training We Need Now, Policy Exchange, 2020
  • “Educating for a cooperative society –building human and social capital: the role of government” in G. Redding, A. Drew and S. Crump (eds), The Oxford Handbook of Higher Education Systems and University Management, 2019
  • “The economic and social benefits of skills” in Oxford Handbook of Skills and Training, 2017 (with I Grugulis and C. Holmes)
  • “Skills and training: the landscape” in Oxford Handbook of Skills and Training, 2017 (with J. Buchanan, D. Finegold and C. Warhurst)
  • Mayhew, K, Wickham-Jones, M (2014) “The UK’s Social Model from New Deal to Economic Crisis”, In: J-E Dolvik, A Martin (eds.) European Social Models from Crisis to Crisis: Employment and Inequality in an Era of Monetary Integration.Oxford: OUP.
  • Holmes, C, Mayhew, K (2014) “The winners and losers in the ‘hourglass’ labour market”, In: Understanding Employer Engagement in Education: Theories and Evidence. 92-113
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.4324/9781315779966
  • Mayhew, K (2010) “Comment on Anderson and Ruhs”, In: B Anderson, M Ruhs (eds.) Who Needs Migrant Workers: Labour Shortages, Immigration and Public Policy.
  • Gautié, J, Westergaard-Nielsen, N, Schmitt, J, Mayhew, K (2010) “The impact of institutions on the supply side of the low-wage labor market”, In: Low-Wage Work in the Wealthy World. 147-182
  • Bosch, G, Mayhew, K, Gautié, J (2010) “Industrial relations, legal regulations, and wage setting”, In: Low-Wage Work in the Wealthy World. 91-146
  • Mayhew, K, Keep, E (2009) “Knowledge, skills and competitiveness”, In: F Rauner, R Maclean (eds.) Handbook of TVET Research.
  • Mayhew, K, Mason, G, Osborne, M, Stevens, P (2008) “Low pay, labour market institutions and job quality”, In: C Lloyd, G Mason, K Mayhew (eds.) Low Wage Work in the UK. New York: Russell Sage.
  • Mayhew, K, Mason, G (2008) “Low paid work in the UK: an overview”, In: C Lloyd, G Mason, K Mayhew (eds.) Low Wage Work in the UK. New York: Russell Sage.
  • Mayhew, K, Deer, C (2007) “The changing nature and context of higher education in the UK”, In: T Butler, M Dane (eds.) Reflections on Change.
  • Mayhew, K (2005) How to improve the human capital of older workers. Paris: OECD.
  • Mayhew, K, de Grip, A, van Loo, J (2002) “The economics of skills obsolescence”, In: A de Grip, J van Loo, K Mayhew (eds.) The Economics of Skills Obsolescence: Theoretical Innovations and Empirical Applications. Jai.
  • Mayhew, K (2002) “The high skills vision”, In: A Jolly (ed.) Skills and Training Directory. Kogan Page.
  • Mayhew, K (2002) “Higher education – size matters”, In: G Hayward, S James (eds.) Growing Higher Education: Expansion or Hyperinflation.
  • Mayhew, K, Holtham, G, Ingram, P (1998) “The long term unemployed – what more can be done?”, In:J McCormick, C Oppenheim (eds.) Welfare in Working Order. London: IPPR.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1998) “Vocational Education and Training and Economic Performance”, In: T Buxton, P Chapman, J Temple (eds.) Britain’s Economic Performance. 2nd edition. London: Routledge. 367-395
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1998) “Training and Development”, In: S Fox (ed.) The European business environment UK. London: Thomson Business Press. 219-241
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1996) “UK Training Policy – Assumptions and Reality”, In: A Booth, DJ Snower (eds.) Acquiring Skills Market Failures, Their Symptoms and Policy Responses. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 303-334
  • Mayhew, K, Ingram, P, Guest, D (1996) “How do we think about pay?”, In: H Murlis (ed.) Pay at the Crossroads. London: IPD.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1996) “Training for the Unemployed”, In: P Meadows (ed.) Work out – or Work in? Contributions to the debate on the future of work. York: Joseph Rowntree Foundation. 140-155
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1995) “The Economic Demand for Higher Education, and Investing in People – Two Aspects of Sustainable Development in British Higher Education”, In: F Coffield (ed.) Higher Education in a Learning Society. Durham: Durham University School of Education. 81-110
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1995) Training Policy for Competitiveness – Time for a Fresh Perspective? London: Policy Studies Institute. 110-145
  • Mayhew, K, Layard, R, Owen, G (1994) “Why we need a Training Reform Act”, In: K Mayhew, R Layard, G Owen (eds.) Britain’s Training Deficit. Avebury.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1994) “The Changing Structure of Training Provision”, In: T Buxton, P Chapman, P Temple (eds.) Britain’s Economic Performance. London: Routledge.
  • Mayhew, K, Anderton, R (1994) “A comparative analysis of the UK labour market”, In: R Barrell (ed.) The UK Labour Market: Comparative Aspects and Institutional Developments. Cambridge University Press.
  • Mayhew, K (1994) “Pay policies in the private sector: an international overview”, In: M Lavender (ed.) International Pay Policies. London: Public Finance Foundation.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1993) “Training and the Labour Market”, In: C Trinder, P Jackson (eds.) The Public Services Yearbook 1993. London: Chapman and Hall. 169-190
  • Mayhew, K (1992) “Incomes policy”, In: New Palgrave Dictionary of Money and Finance. Palgrave.
  • Mayhew, K (1991) “Pay policies in the private sector: an international overview”, In: J Hawkins (ed.) International Pay Policies. London: Public Finance Foundation.
  • Mayhew, K, McGuire, A, Fenn, P (1991) “The economics of health care”, In: K Mayhew, A McGuire, P Fenn (eds.) Providing Health Care. Oxford: OUP.
  • Mayhew, K, Bowen, A (1991) “Regional economic disparities: some public policy issues”, In: K Mayhew, A Bowen (eds.) Reducing Regional Inequalities.
  • Mayhew, K (1991) “Training: the way ahead”, In: Employment Institute (ed.) Improving Britain’s Industrial Performance. Employment Institute.
  • Mayhew, K (1991) “Regional issues in economics: setting the scene”, In: K Mayhew, A Bowen (eds.) Reducing Regional Inequalities.
  • Keep, EJ (1990) “Training for the Low Paid”, In: A Bowen, K Mayhew (eds.) Improving Incentives for the Low-Paid. London: Macmillan/NEDO. 139-180
  • Mayhew, K, Ray, A (1990) “White collar pay and employment”, In: M Gregory, A Thompson (eds.) A Portrait of Pay. OUP.
  • Mayhew, K, Bowen, A (1990) “Incentives for the low paid: issues for public policy”, In: K Mayhew, A Bowen (eds.) Improving Incentives for the Low Paid.
  • Mayhew, K, Bowen, A, Brewer, D (1990) “Incentives for the low paid: setting the scene”, In: K Mayhew, A Bowen (eds.) Improving Incentives for the Low Paid.
  • Mayhew, K, Turnbull, P (1989) “Models of union behaviour”, In: R Perlman, R Drago (eds.) Microeconomic Issues in the Labour Market. Harvester.
  • Mayhew, K (1986) “Economists and immigration”, In: A Dummett (ed.) Towards a Just Immigration Policy.
  • Mayhew, K (1986) “Employee behaviour”, In: D Morris (ed.) The Economic System in the UK. OUP.
  • Mayhew, K, Addison, J (1983) “Discrimination in the labour market”, In: G Bain (ed.) Industrial relations in Britain. Blackwell.
  • Mayhew, K (1983) “Traditional incomes policies”, In: D Robinson, K Mayhew (eds.) Pay Policies for the Future.
  • Mayhew, K, Greenhalgh, C (1981) “Labour supply in Great Britain: theory and evidence”, In: Z Hornstein, J Grice (eds.) The Economics of the Labour Market. HMSO.
  • Mayhew, K (1981) “Incomes policy and the private sector”, In: R Elliott, L Fallick (eds.) Incomes Policy, Inflation and Relative Pay. George Allen and Unwin.
  • Mayhew, K (1981) “The institutional context of incomes policy”, In: R Chater, A Dean, R Elliott (eds.) Incomes Policies. OUP.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K “Education and Training”, In: C Trinder, P Jackson (eds.) Public Services Yearbook 1994. London: Chapman and Hall. 237-254
Conference papers
Journal articles
  • “BREXIT and UK higher education”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 2022
  • “Kurzarbeit/short time working: experiences and lessons from the COVID-induced downturn”, National Institute Economic Review, 2022 (with B. Casey)
  • “What accounts for changes in the chances of being NEET in the UK?”, Journal of Education and Work, 2021 (with C. Holmes and E. Murphy)
  • “Regional inequalities: causes and cures”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 2021 (with F. Corvers)
  • “COVID 19 and the labour market”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 2020 (with P. Anand)
  • “Higher education and the labour market”, Oxford Review of Education, 2020 (with H. Lauder)
  • Inequality”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 2019 (with S. Wills)
  • Mayhew, K (2017) “UK higher education and Brexit”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 33(1) S155-S161.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grx012
  • Mayhew, K (2016) “Human Capital, Growth and Inequality”, Welsh Economic Review. 24(0) 23-23.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.18573/j.2016.10052
  • Holmes, C, Mayhew, K (2016) “The economics of higher education”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 32(4) 475-496.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grw031
  • Mayhew, K (2015) “Derek Robinson (9 February 1932-1 September 2014)”, ECONOMIC AND LABOUR RELATIONS REVIEW.26(3) 490-492.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/1035304615597839
  • Laczik, A, Mayhew, K (2015) “Labour market developments and their significance for VET in England: Current concerns and debates”, Research in Comparative and International Education. 10(4) 558-575.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/1745499915615974
  • Mayhew, K (2015) “UK labour market policy then and now”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 31(2) 199-216.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grv017
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K (2014) “Inequality – ‘wicked problems’, labour market outcomes and the search for silver bullets”, OXFORD REVIEW OF EDUCATION. 40(6) 764-781.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/03054985.2014.979580
  • Mayhew, K (2013) “Government and business: an introduction”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 29(2) 249-260.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grt028
  • Cobham, D, Adam, C, Mayhew, K (2013) “The economic record of the 1997-2010 Labour government: an assessment”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 29(1) 1-24.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grt014
  • Amable, B, Mayhew, K (2011) “Unemployment in the OECD”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 27(2) 207-220.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grr019
  • Lloyd, C, Mayhew, K (2010) “Skill: the solution to low wage work?”, Industrial Relations Journal. 41(5) 429-445.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2338.2010.00578.x
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K (2010) “Moving beyond skills as a social and economic panacea”, WORK EMPLOYMENT AND SOCIETY. 24(3) 565-577.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0950017010371663
  • Salverda, W, Mayhew, K (2009) “Capitalist economies and wage inequality”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 25(1) 126-154.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grp008
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K, Payne, J (2006) “From skills revolution to productivity miracle – Not as easy as it sounds?”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 22(4) 539-559.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grj032
  • Mayhew, K, Neely, A (2006) “Improving productivity – Opening the black box”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 22(4) 445-456.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grj026
  • Mayhew, K, Deer, C, Dua, M (2004) “The move to mass higher education in the UK: many questions and some answers”, OXFORD REVIEW OF EDUCATION. 30(1) 65-82.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/0305498042000190069
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K (2004) “The economic and distributional implications of current policies on higher education”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 20(2) 298-314.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grh017
  • Gold, M, Charlwood, A, Müller-Camen, M, Lucas, R, Crowley, S, Heery, E, Benson, J, Mayhew, K, Bach, S, Moore, S, Finkin, M, Rowlinson, M, Beauregard, A (2002) “Book Reviews”, British Journal of Industrial Relations. 40 341-368.
  • Mayhew, K (2002) “The state of working Britain”, BRITISH JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS. 40(2) 355-357.
    Borghans, L, Green, F, Mayhew, K (2001) “Skills measurement and economic analysis: An introduction”, OXFORD ECONOMIC PAPERS-NEW SERIES. 53(3) 375-384.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oep/53.3.375
  • Mayhew, K (2000) “The assessment: Labour markets and welfare”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 16(1) 1-12.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/16.1.1
  • Felstead, A, Green, F, Pack, A, Mayhew, K (2000) “The Impact of Training on Labour”, British Journal of Industrial Relations. 38(2)
  • Green, F, Felstead, A, Mayhew, K, Pack, A (2000) “The impact of training on labour mobility: Individual and firm-level evidence from Britain”, BRITISH JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS. 38(2) 261-275.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/1467-8543.00162
  • Felstead, A, Green, F, Mayhew, K (1999) “Britain’s training statistics: A cautionary tale”, WORK EMPLOYMENT AND SOCIETY. 13(1) 107-115.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1017/S0950017099000070
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K (1999) “The assessment: Knowledge, skills, and competitiveness”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 15(1) 1-15.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/15.1.1
  • Mayhem, K (1997) “The Education and Training Mismatch”, Business Strategy Review. 8(2) 51-53.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/1467-8616.00022
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K (1996) “Towards a learning society — Definition and measurement”, Policy Studies. 17(3) 215-232.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/01442879608423708
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K (1996) “Economic Demand for Higher Education? A Sound Foundation for Further Expansion?”, Higher Education Quarterly. 50(2) 89-109.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2273.1996.tb01693.x
  • MAYHEW, K, SEABRIGHT, P (1992) “INCENTIVES AND THE MANAGEMENT OF ENTERPRISES IN ECONOMIC TRANSITION: CAPITAL MARKETS ARE NOT ENOUGH”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy. 8(1) 105-129.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/8.1.105
  • HELM, D, MAYER, C, MAYHEW, K (1991) “THE ASSESSMENT – MICROECONOMIC POLICY IN THE 1980S”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 7(3) 1-12.
  • MAYHEW, K (1991) “THE ECONOMICS OF HUMAN – RESOURCE MANAGEMENT – MITCHELL, DJB, ZAIDI, MA”, BRITISH JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS. 29(3) 534-535.
  • MAYHEW, K (1991) “THE ASSESSMENT – THE UK LABOR-MARKET IN THE 1980S”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 7(1) 1-17.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/7.1.1
  • McGUIRE, A, FENN, P, MAYHEW, K (1989) “THE ASSESSMENT: THE ECONOMICS OF HEALTH CARE”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy. 5(1) 1-20.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/5.1.1
  • KEEP, E, MAYHEW, E (1988) “THE ASSESSMENT: EDUCATION, TRAINING AND ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy. 4(3) 1-1.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/4.3.1-a
  • KNIGHT, JB, MAYHEW, K (1987) “WAGE DETERMINATION AND LABOR-MARKET INFLEXIBILITY – INTRODUCTION”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 49(1) 1-8.
  • MAYHEW, K (1986) “WAGE RESTRAINT BY CONSENSUS – BRITAIN SEARCH FOR AN INCOMES-POLICY AGREEMENT 1965-79 – FISHBEIN, WH”, JOURNAL OF ECONOMIC LITERATURE. 24(2) 694-695.
  • Mayhew, K (1985) “Reforming the labour market”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy. 1(2) 60-79.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/1.2.60
  • MAYHEW, K (1985) “ECONOMICS OF UNEMPLOYMENT – AN HISTORICAL-PERSPECTIVE – CASSON, M”, INDUSTRIAL & LABOR RELATIONS REVIEW. 38(4) 667-668.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.2307/2524010
  • ROBINSON, D, MAYHEW, K (1983) “SPECIAL ISSUE – PAY POLICIES FOR THE FUTURE – INTRODUCTION”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 45(1) 3-13.
  • MAYHEW, K (1983) “FAIRNESS, COLLECTIVE-BARGAINING, AND INCOMES-POLICY – WILLMAN, P”, MANCHESTER SCHOOL OF ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL STUDIES. 51(1) 105-106.
  • MAYHEW, K (1983) “TRADITIONAL INCOMES POLICIES”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 45(1) 15-32.
    ROBINSON, D, MAYHEW, K (1983) “SPECIAL ISSUE – PAY POLICIES FOR THE FUTURE – CONCLUSIONS”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 45(1) 127-139.
  • MAYHEW, K, ROSEWELL, B (1981) “OCCUPATIONAL-MOBILITY IN BRITAIN”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 43(3) 225-255.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1981.mp43003001.x
  • MAYHEW, K, ROSEWELL, B (1979) “LABOR-MARKET SEGMENTATION IN BRITAIN”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 41(2) 81-115.
  • MAYHEW, K (1979) “ECONOMISTS AND STRIKES”,OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 41(1) 1-19.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1979.mp41001001.x
  • MAYHEW, K, ROSEWELL, B (1978) “IMMIGRANTS AND OCCUPATIONAL CROWDING IN GREAT-BRITAIN”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 40(3) 223-248.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1978.mp40003003.x
  • MAYHEW, K (1977) “DEGREE OF UNIONIZATION 1948-68 – COMMENT”, BULLETIN OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH. 29(1) 51-53.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8586.1977.tb00409.x
  • MAYHEW, K (1977) “EARNINGS DISPERSION IN LOCAL LABOR-MARKETS – IMPLICATIONS FOR SEARCH BEHAVIOR”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 39(2) 93-107.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1977.mp39002001.x
  • MAYHEW, K (1976) “REGIONAL VARIATIONS OF MANUAL EARNINGS IN ENGINEERING”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 38(1) 11-25.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1976.mp38001002.x
  • MAYHEW, K (1976) “PLANT SIZE AND EARNINGS OF MANUAL WORKERS IN ENGINEERING”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 38(3) 149-160.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1976.mp38003001.x
  • MAYHEW, K (1975) “REVERSAL OF SKILL DIFFERENTIALS UNDER PAYMENT BY RESULTS SYSTEMS CASE OF ENGINEERING”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 37(4) 251-267.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1975.mp37004001.x
  • Mayhew, K “The resurgence of incomes policy”, Manpower Policy and Practice.
  • Mayhew, K, Rijkers, B “Improving the human capital of older workers”, Ageing Horizons.
  • Mayhew, K, Felstead, A, Green, F “Interpreting training statistics in Europe: issuing a health warning”, European Journal for Vocational Training.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K “Towards the knowledge-driven economy”, 7(4) 50-59.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K “Was Ratner Right? Product Market and Competitive Strategies and Their Links with Skills and Knowledge”, EPI Economic Report. 12(3) 1-14.
  • Mayhew, K “The Assessment: Labour Markets and Welfare”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Vol. 16.(1)
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/16.1.1
Reports
  • Alternative Pathways into the Labour Market, CIPD, 2016 (with Craig Holmes)
  • Wilde, S, James, SF, Mayhew, K (2015) Training Managers: Benefits from and barriers to WorldSkills UK participation. Oxford: Oxford University Consulting.
  • Mayhew, K, Holmes, C (2015) Over-qualification and skills mismatch in the graduate labour market. London: CIPD.
  • James Relly, SF, Holmes, C, Mayhew, K (2015) Learning environments to develop vocational excellence. http://vocationalexcellence.education.ox.ac.uk/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/Project-2-Phase-2-Final-Report-Learning-environments-to-develop-vocational-excellence.pdf:
  • Chankseliani, M, James Relly, S, Mayhew, K (2015) WorldSkills competitors and entrepreneurship: A Report to the Skills Funding Agency.
  • Chankseliani, M, James Relly, Susan, Mayhew, Ken (2015) “Benefits of Developing Vocational Excellence. A Report to the National Apprenticeship Service of Project 3 (Phase II) of the DUVE suite of projects”, In: Benefits of Developing Vocational Excellence. A Report to the National Apprenticeship Service of Project 3 (Phase II) of the DUVE suite of projects.
  • James Relly, SF, Allen, J, Mayhew, K (2015) Further education college participation in worldSkills and other competitions. http://vocationalexcellence.education.ox.ac.uk/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/Project-4-Further-education-college-participation-in-WorldSkills-and-other-skills-competitions.pdf:
  • James Relly, SF, Rodriguez Leal, T, Mayhew, K (2014) Interim Evaluation Report on the Skills Competition CPD Programme. Oxford: Oxford University Consulting.
  • James Relly, SF, Rodriguez Leal, T, Mayhew, K (2014) Final Evaluation Report on the Skills Competition CPD Programme. Oxford: Oxford University Consulting.
  • James, SF, Mayhew, K, Laczik, A, Mordarska, M (2013) Report on Apprenticeships, Employer Engagement and Vocational Formation in England. Oxford: Oxford University Consulting.
  • James, SF, Mayhew, K, Chankseliani, M, Laczik, A (2013) “Benefits of Developing Vocational Excellence. A Report to the National Apprenticeship Service. Oxford: SKOPE”, In: Benefits of Developing Vocational Excellence A Report to the National Apprenticeship Service of Project 3 of the DUVE suite of projects.
  • James, S, Holmes, C, Mayhew, K (2013) “Learning Environments to Develop vocational Excellence. Oxford: SKOPE”, In: A Report to the National Apprenticeship Service of Project 2 of the DUVE suite of projects. Oxford: SKOPE.
  • Mayhew, K, Holmes, C (2012) Is the UK labour market polarising. London: Resolution Foundation.
  • Holmes, C, Mayhew, K, Keep, EJ (2012) “Ten Big Questions for Higher Education”, In: SKOPE Issues Paper. Cardiff: Cardiff University, SKOPE.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (2011) “Future Directions for Skills Policy”, In: SKOPE submission to the Labour Party Policy Review on skills (mimeo). Universities of Oxford and Cardiff, SKOPE.
  • Mayhew, K, Green, F, Stasz, C (2005) Defining a strategy for the direct assessment of adult skills. Copenhagen:Danish Technological Institute.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (2004) Can Employers Be Persuaded That Training Pays? Glasgow: Future Skills Scotland/ScottishEnterprise.
  • Mayhew, K, Wilson, R, Hogarth, T, Keep, E (2003) Tackling the low skills equilibrium. London: Department of Trade and Industry.
  • Mayhew, K, Green, F, Molloy, E (2003) Employer Perspectives on Skill. London: Department for Education and Skills.
  • Mayhew, K, Keep, E, Bosworth, D (2003) Tackling the low skills equilibrium: a review of the issues. Department of Trade and Industry.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K, Corney, M (2002) Review of the evidence on the rate of return to employers of investment in training and employer training measures. Department of Trade and Industry.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (2001) “Globalisation, Models of Competitive Advantage and Skills”, In: SKOPE Research Paper. Coventry: University of Warwick, SKOPE.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (2000) “The Leisure Sector”, In: National Skills Task Force Research Project Report. Sheffield: DfEE.
  • Mayhew, K, Felstead, A, Green, F (1997) Getting the measure of training. Leeds: Centre for Industrial Policy and Performance, Leeds University.
  • Mayhew, K, Holtham, G (1996) Tackling long term unemployment. London: Institute for Public Policy Research.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1994) “UK Training Policy – Assumptions and Reality”, In: Background briefing paper for TUC national conference ‘Looking Forward to Full Employment’. London: TUC.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1994) Scoping paper for the Institute of Personnel Management ‘What Makes Training Pay?’ Project. London: IPM.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1993) Submission on training and skills utilisation to the House of Commons Select Committee on Trade and Industry’s inquiry into the competitiveness of British manufacturing’, June, 1993. (subsequently published in Evidence to the House of Commons Select Committee on Trade and Industry, Trade and Industry Committee 2nd Report ‘Competitiveness of UK Manufacturing Industry’, Vol 2, Memoranda of Evidence. London: HMSO.
  • Layard, R, Mayhew, K, Owen, G (1993) The Training Reform Act of 1994.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1108/01437729310033296
  • Mayhew, K, St John, B (1989) Subcontracting in Britain. London: Confederation of British Industry.
  • Mayhew, K, Rosewell, B (1981) Manpower problems and changes in the labour market. Bradford: MCB Publications.
  • Mayhew, K, Rosewell, B (1980) Employment and Unemployment Issues in the 1970s.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1108/eb001235
  • Mayhew, K, Lall, S (1973) The income and balance of payments effects of private foreign investment in manufacturing: case studies of Colombia and Malaysia. UNCTAD.
Other
  • “BREXIT and UK higher education”, Realites Industrielles, Feb 2021
  • Skills and Skills Mismatch in Food and Drink Manufacturing, a Report for DEFRA, 2020 (with Craig Holmes)
  • “Career choice and a policy dilemma”, CEDEFOP’S Skill Set and Match, November 2018
  • Oman: National Workforce Planning, SKOPE, 2016
  • Mayhew, K (2015) “Derek Robinson”, Royal Economic Society Newsletter.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1999) “Demand and supply”, People Management. 40-42.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1998) “Was Ratner Right”, T-Magazine. 15-17.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1998) “Welfare to Work – some questions ministers must answer”, Parliamentary Brief. 5(3) 18-19.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1996) “What Training Can and Cannot Do for the Jobless”, Parliamentary Brief. 4(4) 43-46.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1994) “Skilling the Jobless: Time for a New Deal”, Employment Policy Institute Economic Report. 8(1) 1-5.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1994) “Skills Cannot Promise a Job”, Parliamentary Brief .3(2) 17-20.

Herb completed a BA (Hons) Psychology at Indiana University in 1968. After that, he achieved an MA at Indiana before moving to UCLA to complete a DPhil in Psychology in 1974.

Shortly after, he was appointed Head of Evaluation Research Services at University of Southern California for 5 years, before moving to Sydney, Australia in 1980 to take a position as Lecturer, and then Senior Lecturer, at Sydney University.

At the same time, he was a Reader in Education. He held these posts until 1990, when he joined the University of Western Sydney. Over the next 15 years at that institution, he served a number of roles, including Research Professor of Education, Professor of Psychology, Dean of Graduate Research Studies, Pro-Vice Chancellor of Research, and Director of Self-concept Enhancement and Learning Facilitation (SELF) Research Centre. Indeed, in 1997 he founded the SELF Research Centre, which now has over 450 members, including many of the top self-concept researchers in the world, and satellite centres at leading Universities in Australia, Europe, North America, and Asia (see http://self.uws.edu.au/). He served as Director of SELF until he departed at the start of 2006 to become a Professor at the University of Oxford.

Herb has supervised scores of Honours-level and Doctoral candidates. Some of his recent PhD supervisions have been in the areas of self-concept theory and intervention, motivation, scale development, bullying, mental toughness in elite athletes, the peer review process, and eating disorders, among others. They generally employ complex quantitative research techniques

Research

Herb Marsh is widely published with 350 articles in more than 70 different journals, 60 chapters, 14 monographs, and 350 conference papers; and co-edits the International Advances in Self Research monograph series. In the most important journals in his disciplines over the last quarter century he is the most frequently published author in American Educational Research Journal (29 articles) and the Journal of Sport & Exercise Psych (21 articles), and second most frequently published author in Journal of Educational Psychology (61 articles). He has a total of 276 journal articles listed in ISI that have been cited a total of more than 11,00 times – including 55 articles with at least 55 citations (ISI H index = 55) and one article with more than 1,100 citations.

He has been recognized as the most productive educational psychologist in the world, as one of the top 10 international researchers in Higher Education and in Social Psychology, and the 11th most productive researcher in the world across all disciplines of psychology. He is a highly cited researcher on ISI’s list of the “world’s most cited and influential scientific authors over a sustained period according to a common standard that covers all countries and all scientific disciplines” (http://isihighlycited.com/), one of only a few UK social science researchers to achieve this recognition and one of the few anywhere to achieve this distinction in two different categories (general social sciences and psychology/psychiatry; presently there is no classification for education).

He has reviewed articles for more than 75 journals and has been on the editorial boards of 14 international journals (J. Ed Psych; Am Ed Res J; Child Devel; Perspectives on Psych Sci; J Pers & Soc Psych; Structural Equation Modelling; Inter J of Sport Psych; Ed & Psych Measurement; J Exp Educ; Educ Res and Eval; J Sport & Exercise Psych; Int J of Sport & Exercise Psych; J of Contemporary Ed Psych; Organizational Res Methods; Multivariate Behavioral Res).

He has served on external advisory committees for the: Scientific Advisory Board of the German Max Planck Institute (Education and Human Development, Berlin); Hong Kong Institute of Educational Research, Chinese University of Hong Kong; Social Sciences and Humanities for the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zürich (Zürich ETH); and the International Research School “The Life Course: Evolutionary and Ontogenetic Dynamics” co-organised by the Univ of Michigan (USA), Univ of Virginia (USA), Humboldt University (Germany), Free University (Germany) and the Max Planck Institute.

Professor Marsh’s research has consistently attracted external funding, including a 100% success record on 24 proposals to the highly competitive Australian Research Council during the last 25 years as well as more recent United Kingdom grants from the Economic and Social Research Council, Higher Education Funding Council for England, and Higher Education Authority.

Other international awards include a Career Achievement Award from the American Educational Research Association, the prestigious Wen Lin Visiting Professorship from The Chinese University of Hong Kong, a visiting travelling fellowship from the British Psychological Society, Fellow of the Australian Academy of Social Sciences and the Society of Multivariate Experimental Psychology, and many keynote presentations at international conferences including the presidential invited keynote addresses for 2007 meetings of both the British Educational Research Association and the American Educational Research Association. In 2008 Professor Marsh was awarded the ESRC Professorial Fellowship which provides professorial salary, support staff and infrastructure for an extended research programme, a highly competitive fellowship awarded to only 3-5 social science researchers across all of the UK.

Major research/scholarly interests

Self-concept and Motivational constructs: Theory, Measurement, Research, Enhancement; Teaching Effectiveness and Its Evaluation: Theory, measurement, research, and enhancement; Higher Education with a particular emphasis on students’ evaluation of teaching and relations between teaching and research; Developmental Psychology; Quantitative analysis, particularly confirmatory factor analysis, structural equation modelling, multilevel modelling; Sports psychology with a particular focus on physical self-concept and motivation; health psychology with a focus on motivational aspects of health related physical activity, physical fitness, and eating disorders; The peer review process in relation to both journals and research grants; Peer support and anti-bullying interventions.

Recent publications (2008 and in press)
Journal articles
  • Cowin, L.S. Johnson, M., Craven, R.G., & Marsh, H.W. (2008) Causal modeling of self-concept, job satisfaction, and retention of nurses International Journal Of Nursing Studies 45, 1449-1459
  • Craven, R. & Marsh, H. W. (2008). The centrality of the self-concept construct for psychological wellbeing and unlocking human potential: Implications for child and educational psychologists Educational & Child Psychology 25, 104-118.
  • Guay, F., Marsh, H. W., Senécal, C. , Dowson, M. (2008). Representations of relatedness with parents and friends and autonomous academic motivation during the late adolescence-early adulthood period: Reciprocal or unidirectional effects? British Journal of Educational Psychology, 78, 621–637
  • Ginns, P., Marsh, H. W., Behnia, M., Cheng, J. H. & Scalas, F. (in press). Using postgraduate students’ evaluations of research experience to benchmark departments and faculties: Issues and challenges British Journal of Educational Psychology
  • Fernet, C., Senécal, C., Guay, F., Marsh, H., & Dowson, M. (2008). The Work Tasks Motivation Scale for Teachers (WTMST) Journal of Career Assessment 16(2), 256-279.
  • Lüdtke, O., Marsh, H. W., Robitzsch, A., Trautwein, U., Asparouhov, T., & Muthén, B. (2008). The multilevel latent covariate model: A new, more reliable approach to group-level effects in contextual studies Psychological Methods 13, 203-229.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2008). The elusive importance effect: More failure for the Jamesian perspective on the importance of importance in shaping self-esteem Journal of Personality 76, 1081-1121.
  • Marsh, H. W., Jayasinghe, U. W., & Bond, N. W. (2008). Improving the peer-review process for grant applications: Reliability, validity and generalization American Psychologist 63, 160-168.
  • Marsh; H., Ludtke, O., Robitzsch, A., Trautwein, U. Latent (in press). Profile Analysis of Academic Self-concept Dimensions: Synergy of Person- and Variable-centered Approaches to the Internal/External Frame of Reference Models Structural Equation Modeling
  • Marsh, H. W., Martin, A. J., & Cheng, J. H. S. (2008). A multilevel perspective on gender in classroom motivation and climate: Potential benefits of male teachers for boys? Journal of Educational Psychology 100, 78-95.
  • Marsh, H. W., & O’Mara, A. (2008). Reciprocal effects between academic self-concept, self-esteem, achievement and attainment over seven adolescent years: Unidimensional and multidimensional perspectives of self-concept  Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin 34, 542-552.
  • Marsh, H. W., O’Mara, A. J. & Malmberg, L. (2008). Meta-Analysis: A three-level multilevel meta-anlaysis.
  • Marsh, H. W., Seaton, M., Trautwein, U., Lüdtke, O., Hau, K. T., O’Mara, A. J., & Craven, R. G. (2008). The big-fish-little-pond-effect stands up to critical scrutiny: Implications for theory, methodology, and future research Educational Psychology Review 20, 319-350.
  • Marsh, H. W., Trautwein, U., Ludtke, O. & Köller, O. (2008). Social comparison and big-fish-little-pond effects on self-concept and other self-belief constructs: Role of generalized and specific others Journal of Educational Psychology 100, 510-524.
  • Martin, A. J., & Marsh, H. W. (2008). Academic buoyancy: Towards an understanding of students’ everyday academic resilience Journal of School Psychology 46, 53-83.
  • Martin, A.J., & Marsh, H.W. (in press). Academic resilience and academic buoyancy: an encompassing multidimensional and hierarchical framing of concepts, causes, correlates, and cognate constructs Oxford Review of Education.
  • Martin, A.J., & Marsh, H.W. (2008). Workplace and academic buoyancy: Psychometric assessment and construct validity amongst school personnel and students Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment 26, 168-184.
  • Martin, A.J., Marsh, H.W., Debus, R. L. & Malmberg L. E. (2008). Performance and mastery orientation of high school and university/college students – A Rasch perspective Educational And Psychological Measurement 68, 464-487.
  • Scalas, L. F. & Marsh, H. W. (in press). The Role of Actual-Ideal Discrepancy in Explaining the Relation Between Physical Appearance and Self-Concept: A Stronger Methodological Approach European Journal of Personality.
  • Seaton, M., Marsh; H., & Craven, R. G. (in press). Earning Its Place as a Pan-Human Theory: Universality of the Big-Fish-Little-Pond Effect (BFLPE) Across 41 Culturally and Economically Diverse Countries Journal of Educational Psycholoygy.
  • Seaton, M., Marsh; H. W., Dumas; F., Huguet, P., Monteil, J. M, Regner, I., Blanton, H., Buunk, A. P., Gibbons, F. X. Kuyper, H., Suls, J. & Wheeler, L. (2008). In search of the big fish: Investigating the coexistance of the big-fish-little-pond effect with the positive effects of upward comparison British Journal of Social Psychology 47, 73-103.
  • Wen, Z., Marsh, H.W.,  Kit-Tai, H. & (in press). Structural Equation Models of Latent Interactions: An Appropriate Standardized Solution and Its Scale-free Properties Structural Equation Modeling
Edited books and chapters
  • Marsh, H. W., Craven, R. G., & McInerney, D. (Eds.). (2008). Self-Processes, Learning, and Enabling Human Potential: Dynamic New Approaches. International Advances in Self Research. Volume 3. Information Age Press: Greenwich, CT.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2007). Application of confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling in sport and exercise psychology. In G. Tenenbaum & R. C. Eklund. (Eds), Handbook of sport psychology (3rd Ed.). (pp. 774-798). Hoboken, NJ, US: John Wiley & Sons Inc.
  • Marsh, H. W. (In press). A multidimensional, hierarchical model of self-concept: An important facet of personality. In G. J. Boyle (ed.). Handbook of Personality. Sage: London.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2007). Physical Self-Concept and Sport. In S. Jowette & D. Lavallee, David (Eds), Social Psychology in Sport. (pp. 159-179). Champaign, IL, US: Human Kinetics.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2007). Students’ evaluations of university teaching: A multidimensional perspective. In R. P. Perry & J C. Smart (Eds.), The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: An Evidence-Based Perspective (pp.319-384).  New York: Springer.
  • Marsh, H.W., Cheng, J.,  Middleton, C. J. (in press). The Physical Self: Exploring Measurement and Constructs Surrounding Physical Self-Concept
  • Marsh, H.W., Martin, A. J. & Cheng, J. (2008). How we judge ourselves from different perspectives: Contextual influences on self-concept formation. In M. L. Maehr, S. Karabenick & T. Urdan (Eds.). Advances in Motivation and Achievement (Volume 15). New York: Elsevier.
  • Marsh, H.W., & O’Mara, A. J. (2008). Self-concept is as multidisciplinary as it is multidimensional: A review of theory, measurement, and practice in self-concept research. In H. W. Marsh, R. G. Craven, & D. M. McInerney (Eds.). Self-Processes, Learning, and Enabling Human Potential: Dynamic New Approaches. (Volume 3, pp. 87-118). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing
  • Marsh, H.W., & Retali, K. (in press). Academic self-concept. K. Littleton, C. Wood, J. K. Staarman (Eds.). Elsevier Handbook of Educational Psychology: New Perspectives on Learning and Teaching. New York: Elsevier
  • Marsh, H.W., Scalas L.F. (in press). Self-concept and learning: Reciprocal effects model between academic self-concept and academic achievement. To appear in B. McGaw, E. Baker, P. P. Peterson (Eds.) International Encyclopedia of Education, 3rd edition. Elsevier.
  • McInerney, D. M., Marsh, H.W., & Craven, R. G., & (2008). Self-Processes, Learning, and Enabling Human Potential. In H. W. Marsh, R. G. Craven, & D. M. McInerney (Eds.). Self-Processes, Learning, and Enabling Human Potential: Dynamic New Approaches. (Volume 3, pp. 3-12). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.
  • Parada, R., Craven, R. G., & Marsh, H.W. (2008). The beyond bullying secondary program: An innovative program empowering teachers to counteract bullying in schools. Self-Processes, Learning, and Enabling Human Potential: Dynamic New Approaches. (Volume 3, pp. 373-426). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.
  • Seaton, M., Craven, R. G., &  Marsh, H.W. (2008). East Meets West: Investigating the Generalizability of the Big-Fish-Little-Pond Effect in Western and Non-Western Countries. In H. W. Marsh, R. G. Craven, & D. M. McInerney (Eds.). Self-Processes, Learning, and Enabling Human Potential: Dynamic New Approaches. (Volume 3, pp. 353-372). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.
Most important publications (prior to 2008)
  • Marsh, H. W. (2007). Students’ evaluations of university teaching: A multidimensional perspective. In R. P. Perry & J C. Smart (Ed.), The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: An Evidence-Based Perspective (pp.319-384).  New York: Springer.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2007).Self-concept theory, measurement and research into practice: The role of self-concept in educational psychology. Leicester, UK: British Psychological Society.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2007). Application of confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling in sport/exercise psychology. In G. Tenenbaum & R. C. Eklund (Eds.), Handbook of on sport psychology (3rd ed., pp. 774 – 798). New York: Wiley.
  • Marsh, H. W., & Hau, K-T. (2007). Applications of latent-variable models in educational psychology: The need for methodological-substantive synergies. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 32, 151-171.
  • Marsh, H. W., Hau, K-T., Artelt, C., Baumert, J., Peschar, J. L. (2006). OECD’s brief self-report measure of educational psychology’s most useful affective constructs: Cross-cultural, psychometric comparisons across 25 countries. International Journal of Testing. 6, 311–360.  (special issue of journal).
  • Marsh, H. W. & Craven, R. G. (2006). Reciprocal effects of self-concept and performance from a multidimensional perspective: Beyond seductive pleasure and unidimensional perspectives. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 1, 133-163.
  • Marsh, H. W., Martin, A. J., & Hau, K-T. (2006). A Multiple Method Perspective on Self-concept Research in Educational Psychology: A Construct Validity Approach. In M. Eid & E. Diener (Eds.), Handbook of Multimethod Measurement in Psychology (pp. 441-456). American Psychological Association: Washington DC.
  • Marsh, H.W., Papaioannou, A., Theodorakis, Y. (2006). Causal ordering of physical self-concept and exercise behavior: Reciprocal effects model and the influence of physical education teachers. Health Psychology, 25 (3): 316-328
  • Marsh, H. W., Trautwein, U., Lüdtke, O., Köller, O. & Baumert, J. (2006) Integration of multidimensional self-concept and core personality constructs: Construct validation and relations to well-being and achievement. Journal of Personality, 74, 403-455.
  • Marsh, H. W., Ellis, L., Parada, L., Richards, G. & Heubeck, B. G. (2005). A short version of the Self Description Questionnaire II: Operationalizing criteria for short-form evaluation with new applications of confirmatory factor analyses. Psychological Assessment, 17, 81-102.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2005). Big fish little pond effect on academic self-concept. German Journal of Educational Psychology, 19, 119-128.
  • Marsh, H. W. & Kleitman, S. (2005). Consequences of employment during high school: Character building, subversion of academic goals, or a threshold. American Educational Research Journal, 42, 331-369.
  • Marsh, H. W., Debus, R. & Bornholt, L. (2005). Validating Young Children’s Self-concept Responses: Methodological Ways and means to understand their responses. In D. M. Teti (Ed.), Handbook of Research Methods in Developmental Science (pp. 138-160). Blackwell Publishers: Oxford, UK.
  • Marsh, H. W., Hau, K-T & Grayson, D. (2005). Goodness of Fit Evaluation in Structural Equation Modeling. In A. Maydeu-Olivares & J. McArdle (Eds.), Contemporary Psychometrics. A Festschrift for Roderick P. McDonald (pp. 275-340). Mahwah NJ: Erlbaum.
  • Marsh, H. W., & Perry, C. (2005). Does a positive self-concept contribute to winning gold medals in elite swimming? The causal ordering of elite athlete self-concept and championship performances. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 27, 71-91.
  • Marsh, H. W., Trautwein, U., Lüdtke, O., Köller, O. & Baumert, J. (2005) Academic self-concept, interest, grades and standardized test scores: Reciprocal effects models of causal ordering. Child Development, 76, 297-416.
  • Marsh, H. W. & Hau, K. T. (2004). Explaining paradoxical relations between academic self-concepts and achievements: Cross-cultural generalizability of the internal-external frame of reference predictions across 26 countries. Journal of Educational Psychology, 96,  56-67
  • Marsh, H.W., Hau, K.T. & Wen, Z., (2004).  In search of golden rules: Comment on hypothesis testing approaches to setting cutoff values for fit indexes and dangers in overgeneralising Hu & Bentler’s (1999) findings. Structural Equation Modelling, 11, 320-341.
  • Marsh, H. W.; Wen, Z.; Hau, K. (2004). Structural equation models of latent interactions: Evaluation of alternative estimation strategies and indicator construction. Psychological Methods, 9, 275-300.
  • Marsh, H. W. & Hau, K. T. (2003). Big fish little pond effect on academic self-concept: A crosscultural (26 country) test of the negative effects of academically selective schools. American Psychologist, 58, 364-376.
  • Guay, F., Marsh, H. W. & Boivin, M. (2003). Academic self-concept and academic achievement: Development perspectives on their causal ordering. Journal of Educational Psychology, 95, 124-136.
  • Marsh, H. W., Hau, K-T, & Kong, C-K, (2002). Multilevel Modeling of Longitudinal Growth and Change: Substantive Effects or Regression Toward the Mean Artifacts? Multivariate Behavioral Research, 37, 245-282.
  • Jayasinghe, U. W., Marsh, H. W. & Bond, N. (2002). A Multilevel Cross-classified Modelling Approach to Peer Review of Grant Proposals: The Effects of Assessor and Researcher Attributes on Assessor Ratings. Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A-Statistics in Society, 166, 279-300.
  • Marsh, H. W., Ellis, L., & Craven, R. G. (2002). How do preschool children feel about themselves? Unravelling measurement and multidimensional self-concept structure. Developmental Psychology, 38, 376-393.
  • Marsh, H. W. & Hattie, J. (2002). The relationship between research productivity and teaching effectiveness: Complimentary, antagonistic or independent constructs. Journal of Higher Education, 73, 603-642.
  • Marsh, H. W. & Kleitman, S. (2002). Extracurricular school activities: The good, the bad, and the nonlinear. Harvard Educational Review, 72, 464-502.
  • Marsh, H. W., Rowe, K., Martin, A. (2002). PhD students’ evaluations of research supervision: Issues, complexities and challenges in a nationwide Australian experiment in benchmarking universities. Journal of Higher Education, 73 (3), 313-348.
  • Marsh, H. W., Koeller, O., & Baumert, J. (2001). Reunification of East and West German school systems: Longitudinal multilevel modeling study of the big fish little pond effect on academic self-concept. American Educational Research Journal, 38 (2), 321-350.
  • Marsh, H. W., Parada, R. H., Yeung, A. S. & Healey, J. (2001). Aggressive School Troublemakers and Victims:A Longitudinal Model Examining the Pivotal Role of Self-concept. Journal of Educational Psychology, 93(2), 411-419.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2001). Distinguishing between good (useful) and bad workload on students’ evaluations of teaching. American Educational Research Journal, 38 (1), 183-212.
  • Marsh, H. W., Hau, K-T, & Kong, C-K, (2000). Late Immersion and Language of Instruction (English vs. Chinese) in Hong Kong High Schools: Achievement Growth in Language and Nonlanguage Subjects. Harvard Educational Review 70, 302-346.
  • Marsh, H. W., Kong, C-K, Hau, K-T (2000).  Longitudinal Multilevel Modeling of the Big Fish Little Pond Effect on Academic Self-concept:  Counterbalancing Social Comparison and Reflected Glory Effects in Hong Kong High Schools. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 78,  337-349.
  • Marsh, H. W., & Roche, L. A. (2000). Effects of grading leniency and low workloads on students’ evaluations of teaching: Popular myth, bias, validity or innocent bystanders? Journal of Educational Psychology, 92,:202-228.
  • Marsh, H. W., Craven, R. G., & Debus, R. (1998). Structure, stability, and development of young children’s self-concepts: A multicohort-multioccasion study. Child Development, 69(4), 1030-1053.
  • Marsh, H. W., Hau, K-T., Balla, J R., & Grayson, D. (1998) Is more ever too much? The number of indicators per factor in confirmatory factor analysis. Multivariate Behavioral Research, 33, 181-220.
  • Marsh, H. W., & Roche, L. A (1997). Making students’ evaluations of teaching effectiveness effective. American Psychologist, 52, 1187-1197.
  • Marsh, H. W. (1997). The measurement of physical self-concept: A construct validation approach. In K. Fox (Ed.), The physical self-: From motivation to well-being (pp. 27-58). Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.
  • Marsh, H. W.,  & Craven, R. (1997). Academic self-concept: Beyond the dustbowl. In G. Phye (Ed.), Handbook of classroom assessment: Learning, achievement, and adjustment (pp. 131-198). Orlando, FL : Academic Press.

Ingrid Lunt is a psychologist by background, and joined the Oxford Department of Education in 2005, having previously worked for 20 years at the Institute of Education, University of London.

She was Director of Graduate Studies for 5 years, and the first Director of the new ESRC Doctoral Training Centre (DTC) in the Social Sciences.

She has been President of the British Psychological Society (1998-1999), President of the European Federation of Psychologists Associations (1993-1999), and Vice President of the International Union of Psychological Science (2004-2008).

She has carried out research in the field of special educational needs and inclusive education, and more recently in the area of higher education, in particular higher professional education, and doctoral education. For the past 20 years she has been leading a project, initially funded by the European Union, which has been developing a common qualifications framework for psychologists across Europe.

Research

Ingrid’s research interests include higher professional learning, doctoral education, comparative higher education policy in European countries.

Publications

Selected publications include:

  • Scott D., Brown A., Lunt I., Thorne L. (2004) Professional Doctorates: Integrating professional and academic knowledge. Open University Press and SRHE
  • Klenowski V. and Lunt I. (2008) Enhancing Learning at Doctoral Level through the use of reflection? Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education 33, 2, 203-217.
  • Lunt I. (2008) Psychologist qualifications in Europe: Common standards for quality and mobility. Australian Psychologist 43, 4, 222-230
  • Lunt I. (2008) Beyond tuition fees? The legacy of Blair’s government to higher education. Oxford Review of Education 34, 6, 741-752
  • Edwards A., Lunt I., Stamou E. (2010) Inter-professional work and expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools. British Educational Research Journal 36, 1, 27-45
  • Lunt I. (2011) EuroPsy: the development of standards and competence of psychologists. European Psychologist 16, 2, 104-111
  • Lunt I. and Peiro J. M. (2012) The Bologna Process, education and assessment in psychology. In Ed. D. Dunn, S.C Baker, C.M Mehrota, R.E. Landrum, M.M McCarthy Assessing teaching and learning in psychology: current and future perspectives. Wadsworth Publishing, Belmont CA.
  • Lunt I., McAlpine L., Mills D. (2014) Lively bureaucracy: the ESRC’s Doctoral Training Centres and UK universities. Oxford Review of Education 40, 2, 151-170
  • Lunt I. (2014) International frameworks for psychology education and training: a European perspective. In R. Silbereisen, P. Ritchie, J. Panday (eds.) Psychology Education and Training : a global perspective. Hove: Psychology Press
  • Clarke, G. and Lunt, I. (2014) The concept of ‘originality’ in the PhD: how is it interpreted by examiners? Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, 39 (7), 803-820.
  • Lunt I., Peiró J.M., Poortinga Y.H., Roe R.A. (2015) EuroPsy: Standards and Quality in Education for Professional Psychologists. Göttingen: Hogrefe Pub.

Anne joined the Department in 2005 having held Chairs at the Universities of Leeds and Birmingham. She was Director of the Department for three years (January 2010 to December 2012) and when not in that post, she was its Director of Research. She became Professor Emerita in October 2014.

Anne is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, and of the Learned Society of Wales and is a former President of the British Educational Research Association. She is a Fellow of St Hilda’s College and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Oslo from 2007 to 2016 and has been awarded Doctorates honoris causa by the Universities of Helsinki and Oslo and in 2022 she received a lifetime’s achievement award from the American Educational Research Association’s Cultural-Historical SIG.

She was a member of the ESRC’s Research Grants Board between 2003 and 2007 and a member of the Education sub-panel in the 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise. She is co-founder of OSAT (the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research), is a founding editor of Learning Culture and Social Interaction. She is a member of the UK Cabinet Office’s Research Evidence Impact Panel (REIP), sits on several research advisory boards internationally, undertakes research evaluations for research councils worldwide and continues to be involved in institutional reviews.

Research

Anne’s research draws on cultural-historical approaches to learning. She focuses on professional learning and, in particular, the relational turn in expertise with the concepts of relational expertise, common knowledge and relational agency. These ideas are discussed in her 2010 book with Springer. In her later edited book Working relationally in and across practices (Cambridge University Press, 2017) researchers, who work with her ideas, have tested and refined these concepts in a range of different settings. Her research on practice, relational expertise and inter-professional work with vulnerable children and families also informs her interest in user engagement with research and its implications for the design of educational research. User engagement was discussed in her 2011 book with Mark Rickinson and Judy Sebba, in an exploration of knowledge exchange in the social sciences based in Oxford, and in study of school-university research relationships through the work of school-based research champions.

Her current research, informed by cultural-historical theory, is based at the University of Oslo. The research team has recently completed a Norwegian Research Council study of how elementary school teachers work successfully with shy and withdrawn children. The team has been awarded a further four years’ funding to examine shy children’s experiences of transitions between lessons in high school. She is currently co-authoring a book with Mariane Hedegaard for Cambridge University Press, where the two authors revisit their own research studies to make a case for a relational pedagogy, based in Vygotskian approaches to emotion, development and learning. She is also co-editing, with Helen Bound and Karen Evans and Arthur Chia, a collection for Taylor and Francis on current approaches to workplace learning. Her contribution, with Dorothy Sutherland Olsen, draws on a study of the transitions that arise through the introduction of new technologies into existing workplaces.

Publications since 2009

Books

  • Edwards, A., Daniels, H., Gallagher, T., Leadbetter, J. & Warmington, P. (2009) Improving Inter-professional Collaborations: multi-agency working for children’s wellbeing. London: Routledge.
  • Daniels, H., Edwards, A., Engeström, Y. & Ludvigsen, S. (Eds.) (2009) Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge.
  • Ellis, V., Edwards, A. & Smagorinsky, P.  (Eds.) (2009) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Being an Expert Professional Practitioner: the relational turn in expertise. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Rickinson, M., Sebba, J. & Edwards, A. (2011) Improving User-engagement in Educational Research. London: Routledge.
  • Hedegaard, M., Edwards, A. & Fleer, M. (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wells, G. & Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2013) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Edwards, A. (Ed.) (2017) Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Hedegaard, M.& Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2019) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (Eds.) (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer.
  • Bound, H., Edwards, A. & Evans, K. (Eds.) (forthcoming) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor and Francis.
  • Hedegaard, M. & Edwards, A. (forthcoming) Taking Children Seriously: a relational approach to Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chapters in Books

  • Edwards, A.  (2009) Becoming a Teacher, in H. Daniels, J. Porter & H. Lauder (Eds.) Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning: vol 1. London: Routledge, pp. 153-164.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Agency and Activity Theory: from the systemic to the relational, in A Sannino, H Daniels & K. Guttierez (Eds.) Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 197-211.
  • Edwards, A. & Kinti I. (2009) Working Relationally at Organisational Boundaries: negotiating expertise and identity, in H. Daniels, A. Edwards, Y. Engeström & S. Ludvigsen (Eds.)  Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge, pp. 126-139.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) How can CHAT help us to understand and develop teacher education?, in V. Ellis, A. Edwards & P. Smagorinsky (Eds.) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge, pp. 63-77.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Learning How to Know Who: professional learning for expansive practice between organisations, in S Ludvigsen, A. Lund, I. Rasmussen & R. Saljo (Eds.) Learning Across Sites. London: Routledge, pp. 17-32.
  • Edwards, A.  (2010) Qualitative Designs and Analysis, in G. MacNaughton, S. Rolfe & I. Siraj-Blatchford (Eds.) Doing Early Childhood Research: Theory and Process: an international perspective 2nd Edition. Melbourne: Allen and Unwin, pp.155-175.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) Expertise in the Children’s Workforce: knowledge and motivation in engagement with children, in M. Hedegaard, A. Edwards & M. Fleer (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 173-190.
  • Edwards, A. & Ellis, V.  (2012) The Professional Development of Teachers: European perspectives, in C. Day (Ed.) International Handbook on Teacher and School Development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) User Engagement and the Processes of Educational Research, in L. Farrell & T. Fenwick (Eds.) Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities. London:  Routledge
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Integrating Children’s Services, in G. Head (Ed.) Professionals, Children and the Community: working together, London: Pearson.
  • Edwards, A. & Thompson, M. (2013) Resourceful Leadership: revealing the creativity of organizational leaders, in A. Sannino & V. Ellis (Eds.) Learning and Collective Creativity: Activity-Theoretical and Sociocultural Studies. London: Routledge.  pp. 49-64.
  • Childs, A., Edwards, A. & McNicholl, J. (2013) Developing a Multi-layered System of Distributed Expertise: What does cultural historical theory bring to understandings of workplace learning in school university partnerships?, in O. McNamara et al. (Eds.) Teacher Learning in the Workplace: widening perspectives on practice and policy. Dordecht: Springer. pp. 29-45.
  • Lundsteen, N. & Edwards, A. (2013) Internship: navigating the practices of an investment bank, in G. Wells &   Edwards (Eds.) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.pp.155-168.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Learning from Experience in teaching; a cultural historical critique, in V. Ellis & J. Orchard (Eds.) Learning Teaching from Experience: Multiple Perspectives, International Contexts. London: Bloomsbury.pp.47-61.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Designing Tasks which Engage Learners with Knowledge, in I. Thompson (Ed.) Task Design,Subject Pedagogy and Student Engagement. London: Routledge. pp. 13-27.
  • Edwards, A. (2016) A Cultural-historical Approach to Practice: working within and across practices, in J. Lynch et al. (Eds.) Practice Theory: Diffractive readings in professional practice and education. London: Routledge.127-140.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural-historical Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: teaching to support student agency, in B. Leibowitz, V. Bozalek & P. Kahn (Eds.) Theorising Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Taylor and Francis. pp.124-138.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Introductory chapter, final chapter and a joint chapter on knowledge exchange in the social sciences with E. Stamou, in A. Edwards (Ed.), Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural Historical Theory and Pedagogy: the influence of Vygotsky on the field, in R. MacLean (Ed.) Handbook on Life in Schools and Classrooms: Past, present and future visions. Dordrecht, Springer. pp. 153-166.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Relational Expertise: a cultural-historical approach to teacher education, in Peters, B. Cowie & I Menter (Eds.) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 555-567.
  • Edwards, A. & Montecinos, C. (2017) Working Relationally on Complex Problems: building the capacity for joint agency in new forms of work, in M. Goller & S. Paloniemi (Eds.) Agency at Work. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 229-247.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) The Dialectic of Person and Practice: how cultural-historical accounts of agency can inform teacher education, in J. Clandinin & J. Husu (Eds.) The Sage Handbook on Research on Teacher Education, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. pp.269-285.
  • Edwards, A. & Hedegaard, M. (2019) Rethinking Professional Support for Challenging Transitions: enabling the agency of children, young people and their families, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 1-18.
  • Edwards, A. & Evangelou, M. (2019) Easing Transitions into School for Children from Socially Excluded ‘Hard to Reach’ Families: from risk and resilience to agency and demand, in M.Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 115-130.
  • Edwards, A. & Fay, Y. (2019) Supporting the Transitions to Work of Autistic Young People: building and using common knowledge, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp 262-278.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp. 1-20.
  • Edwards, A., Chan, J. & Tan, D. (2019) Motive Orientation and the Exercise of Agency: responding to recurrent demands in practices, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp.201-214.
  • Edwards, A. (in press) Learning for a High Skills Economy: what a cultural-historical approach can offer, in H. Bound, A. Chia, J. Tan & R. Lim Wei Ying (Eds.) Flipping the Lens from Teaching to Learning. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Edwards, A. & Sutherland Olsen, D. (forthcoming) Cultural-historical Understandings of Transitions in Changing Workplaces, in H. Bound, A. Edwards, K. Evans, A. Chia (Eds.) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor & Francis.
  • Edwards, A. (forthcoming) A Relational View of a Future-oriented Pedagogy: sustaining the agency of learners and teachers, in N. Hopwood & A. Sannino (Eds.) Agency and Transformation: Motives, mediation and motion. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Refereed Articles

  • Edwards, A. (2009) Understanding Boundaries in Inter-professional Work, The Scottish Educational Review, 41, 1, 5-21.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Relational Agency in Collaborations for the Wellbeing of Children and Young People, Journal of Children’s Services, 4, 1, 33-43.
  • Shaw, I., Morris, K &. Edwards, A. (2009) Technology, Social Services and Organizational Innovation or How Great Expectations in London and Cardiff are Dashed in Lowestoft and Cymtyrch, Journal of Social Work Practice,  23, 4, 383 – 400.
  • Edwards, A., Lunt, I. & Stamou, E. (2010) Inter-professional Work and Expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools, British Educational Research Journal, 36, 1, 27-45.
  • Edwards, A. (2011) Building Common Knowledge at Boundaries between Professional Practices, International Journal of Educational Research 50, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A & Daniels, H. (2012) The knowledge that matters in professional practices Journal of Education and Work 25, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) The role of common knowledge in achieving collaboration across practices Learning Culture and Social Interaction 1, 1, 22-32.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) A Tool for Public Services Research and Development, International Journal of Public Management. 11,1, 21-33.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Discussant’s Comments: Recognising and Realising Teachers’ Professional Agency, Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice. 21, 6, 779-784.
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. & Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: the development of the Oxford Education Deanery narrative, Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373. http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/edui.v6.27724
  • Hopwood, N., Day, C. & Edwards, A. (2016) Partnership Practice as Collaborative Knowledge Work: overcoming common dilemmas through an augmented view of professional expertise, Journal of Children’s Services. 11, 2, 111-123.
  • Engeness, I. & Edwards, A. (2016) The Complexity of Learning: Exploring the Interplay of Different Mediational Means in Group Learning with Digital Tools, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 61, 1, 650-667. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2016.1173093
  • Hopwood, N. & Edwards, A. (2017) How common knowledge is constructed and why it matters in collaboration between professionals and clients, International Journal of Educational Research, 83, 107–119.
  • Edwards, A. (2020) Agency, Common Knowledge and Motive Orientation: working with insights from Hedegaard in research on provision for vulnerable children and young people, Learning Culture and Social Interaction. 26, 100224. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.lcsi.2018.04.004
  • Mjelve, L.H., Nyborg, G., Edwards, A.& Crozier, R. (2019) Teachers’ Understandings of Shyness: psychosocial differentiation for student inclusion, British Educational Research Journal. 45(6), 1295- doi:10.1002/berj.3563
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, H., Edwards, A. & Crozier, R. (2020 ) Teachers’ Strategies for Enhancing Shy Children’s Engagement in Oral Activities: necessary but insufficient? International Journal of Inclusive Education. 1-16. doi:10.1080/13603116.2020.1711538
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A. & Nyborg, G. (2020) Leading for School Inclusion: how school leadership teams support shy students, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 1-14. doi:10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Solberg, S., Edward, A., Mjelve, L.H., & Nyborg, G. (in press). Working relationally with networks of support within schools: Supporting teachers in their work with shy students. Journal of Education for Children Placed at Risk (JESPAR), 1-23. doi.org/10.1080/10824669.2020.1854760
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A., & Nyborg, G. (2020). Leading for school inclusion and prevention? How school leadership teams support shy students and their teachers. Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, 1-14. doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Burn, K. Conway, R., Edwards, A. & Harries, E. (2021) The Role of School-based Research Champions in a School-University Partnership. British Educational Research Journal, 47(3). 616-633. doi.org/10.1002/berj.3675
  • Rickinson, M. & Edwards, A. (2021) The Relational Features of Evidence Use, Cambridge Journal of Education, 51(4), 509-526.  doi.org/10.1080/0305764X.2020.1865877
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, L.H., Edwards, A., Crozier, R. & Coplan, R. (2022) Working relationally with shy students: pedagogical insights from teachers and students. Learning, Culture and Social Interaction. authors.elsevier.com/sd/article/S2210-6561(22)00011-3

Reports

  • Edwards, A. & Stamou, E. (2009) The Development of Preventative Practices in England: implications for the children’s workforce. DCSF: Children’s Workforce Development Council
  • Hannan, S., Canwell, A. Longfils, H. & Edwards, A. (2011) The Resourceful Leader, Nottingham: National College
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Leading the Learning: how the intelligent leader builds capacity. Nottingham: National College.
  • Edwards, A. & Downes, P. (2013) Alliances for Inclusion: cross-sector policy synergies and inter-professional collaboration in and around schools. NESET for the European Commission.
  • Alexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. & Menter, I. (2014) Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools. Oxford University: CitiFoundation.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Inter-professional Working in and around Schools, in C. McLaughlin (Ed.) The Connected School: a design for wellbeing. London: Pearson / NCB.

Geoffrey Walford is Emeritus Professor of Education Policy and an Emeritus Fellow of Green Templeton College at the University of Oxford.

He was previously Reader in Education Policy at Oxford, and Senior Lecturer in Sociology and Education Policy at Aston Business School, Aston University, Birmingham.

He has academic degrees from Oxford, Kent, London and the Open Universities, has authored or edited more than 40 books, and published rather too many academic articles and book chapters. He was Joint Editor of the British Journal of Educational Studies from 1999 to 2002, and was Editor of the Oxford Review of Education from 2004 to 2010. He remains as a Deputy Editor of Ethnography and Education and serves on several editorial boards.

Professor Walford’s main research foci are the relationships between central government policy and local processes of implementation, private schools, choice of schools, religiously-based schools, and ethnographic research methodology. He remains engaged with various scholarly writing activities working, in particular, on issues connected to private schooling for the poor and social justice. He was awarded a DLitt from Oxford University in 2016.

Publications

Major articles and book chapters

  • Geoffrey Walford (2023) ‘Low-fee private schools.’  In Bob Tierney, Fazal Rizvi and Kadriye Wrcikan (editors-in-chief); Fazal Rizvi and Jason Beech (eds.) Section 1, Globalization and shifting geopolitics of education, International Encyclopedia of Education 4th edition, Vol 1 (Oxford: Elsevier) pp.355-365.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2022) ‘Country houses repurposed as private schools: what might be the motivations?’  Oxford Review of Education, 48, 1, pp. 14-27.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2021) ‘Country houses repurposed as private schools: building on inequality.’ Oxford Review of Education, 47, 3, pp. 369-385.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2021) ‘What is worthwhile auto-ethnography? Research in the age of the selfie.’ Ethnography and Education, 16, 1, pp. 31-43.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2020) ‘Interviews and interviewing in the ethnography of education.’ In George W. Noblit. (ed.) Oxford Encyclopedia of Qualitative Research Methods in Education (New York: Oxford University Press) (Reprint) pp. 672-685.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2020) ‘Ethnography is not qualitative.’ Ethnography and Education, 15, 1, pp. 122-136.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2019) ‘The provenance of Stowe. Percy Warrington: the founder schools wished to forget.’ History of Education Researcher, 104, pp. 100-108.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2018) ‘The impossibility of anonymity in ethnographic research.’ Qualitative Research, 18, 5, pp. 516-525.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2018) ‘Interviews and interviewing in the ethnography of education.’Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Education, Editor in Chief: George W. Noblit. On-line. DOI: 10.1093/acrefore/9780190264093.013.320, May, pp. 20.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2018) ‘Recognisable continuity. A defence of multiple methods.’ In Dennis Beach, Carl Bagley, and Sofia Maques da Silva (eds.) The Wiley Handbook of Ethnography of Education (London, Wiley) pp. 17-29.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2017) ‘Ruling-class classification and framing.’ In Agnés Van Zanten (ed.) Elites in Education, Volume 2, National Traditions and Cosmopolitism in Elite Education. (London, Routledge) (Reprint)
  • Geoffrey Walford (2016) ‘Ethnographic methodology: A Virtual Special Issue of Ethnography and Education. Introduction.’ Ethnography and Education.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2015) ‘The globalisation of low-fee private schools’ In Joseph Zajda (ed.) Second International Handbook on Globalisation, Education and Policy Research (Amsterdam, Springer) ISBN: 978-94-017-9492-3, pp. 309-20.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2014) ‘Site selection within comparative case study and ethnographic research.’ (Reprint) In Malcolm Tight (ed.) Case Studies (London, Sage)
  • Ian Macpherson, Susan Robertson and Geoffrey Walford (2014) ‘An introduction to privatisation, education and social justice.’ In Ian Macpherson, Susan Robertson and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) Education, Privatisation, and Social Justice: Case studies from Africa, South Asia, and South East Asia (Abingdon, Symposium) pp. 9-24.
  • Ingrid Lunt and Geoffrey Walford (2014) ‘Contributions to the sociology of education: Past, present and future. A Festschrift for John Furlong.’ Oxford Review of Education, 40, 4, pp. 411-414.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2014) ‘From City Technology Colleges to Free schools: Ideas of social justice.’ Research Papers in Education, 29, 3, pp. 315-329.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2014) ‘Introduction: Academies, Free Schools and social Justice.’ Research Papers in Education, 29, 3, pp. 263-267.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2013) ‘The development of private and public schools in England.’ In Aydin Gürlevik, Christian Palentien and Robert Heyer (eds.) Privatschulen versus staatliche Schulen (Wiesbaden, Germany: Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden) pp. 89-102.  ISBN: (pb) 978-3-531-18199-8; (e-book) 978-3-531-18978-9.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2013) ‘Low-fee private schools: a methodological and political debate.’ In Prachi Srivastava (ed.) Low-Fee Private Schooling: Aggravating equity or mitigating disadvantage? (Oxford: Symposium Books) pp. 199-213. ISBN: 978-1-873927-91-5.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2013) ‘State support for private schooling in India: What do the evaluations of the British Assisted Places Schemes suggest?’ Oxford Review of Education, 39, 4, pp. 533-547.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2013) ‘The development of private and public schools in England.’ In Aydin Gürlevik, Christian Palentien and Robert Heyer (eds.) Privatschulen versus staatliche Schulen (Wiesbaden, Germany: Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden) pp. 89-102.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2013) ‘Low-fee private schools: a methodological and political debate.’ In Prachi Srivastava (ed.) Low-Fee Private Schooling: Aggravating equity or mitigating disadvantage? (Oxford, Symposium Books) pp. 199-213.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2012) ‘Researching the powerful in education: a re-assessment of the problems.’ International Journal for Research and Method in Education, 35, 2, pp. 111-118
  • Geoffrey Walford (2011) ‘Globalization and low-fee private schools?’ Educational Practice and Theory, 33, 1, pp. 37-50.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2011) ‘The Oxford Ethnography Conference: A place in history?’ Ethnography and Education, 6, 2, pp. 133-145.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2011) ‘Low-fee private schools in England and in less economically developed countries. What can we learn from a comparison?’ Compare, 41, 3, pp. 401-413.
  • Eric Tucker, Madhu Viswanathan and Geoffrey Walford (2010) ‘Reflections on social measurement:  How social scientists generate, modify, and validate indicators and scales.’ In Geoffrey Walford, Eric Tucker and Madhu Viswanathan (eds.) The Sage Handbook of Measurement(London, Sage) pp. 1-5.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2010) ‘Faith-based schools in England after ten years of Tony Blair’, in Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Blair’s Educational Legacy? (London, Routledge) pp. 52-62.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2009) ‘For ethnography?’ Ethnography and Education, 4, 3, pp. 273-284.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2009) ‘Private schools in England.’ Zeitschrift für Pädagogik, 55, 5, pp. 716- 731.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2009) ‘The practice of writing ethnographic fieldnotes.’ Ethnography and Education, 4, 2, pp. 117-130.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2009) ‘Symposium review of: John Beck, Meritocracy, Citizenship and Education’ (with Anthony Giddens and Yoshiko Nozaki) British Journal of Sociology of Education, 30, 1, pp. 97-105.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘Finding the limits: autoethnography and being an Oxford University Proctor.’ In Paul Atkinson and Sara Delamont (eds.) Representing Ethnography (London, Sage) pp. 147-162.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘Selecting sites, and gaining ethical and practical access.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.)How to do Educational Ethnography (London, Tufnell Press) pp. 16-38.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘The nature of educational ethnography.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) How to do Educational Ethnography (London, Tufnell Press) pp. 1-15.
  • Martin Forsey, Scott Davies and Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘The globalisation of school choice: an introduction to key issues and concerns.’ In Martin Forsey, Scott Davies and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) The Globalisation of School Schoice? (Abingdon, Symposium Books) pp. 9-25.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘School choice in England: globalisation, policy borrowing or policy corruption? In Martin Forsey, Scott Davies and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) The Globalisation of School Schoice? (Abingdon, Symposium Books) pp. 95-109.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ’Faith-based schools in England after 10 years of Tony Blair.’ Oxford Review of Education, 34, 6, pp. 689-699.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘Muslim schools in England and the Netherlands: sustaining cultural continuity.’ In Zvi Bekerman and Ezra Kopelowitz (eds.) Cultural Education – Cultural Sustainability: Minority, diaspora, indigenous and ethno-religious groups in multicultural societies. (London, Routledge)
  • Geoffrey Walford (2007) ‘Finding the limits: autoethnography and being an Oxford University Proctor.’ In Alan Bryman (ed.) Qualitative Research 2, Volume 3 Issues of Representation and reflexivity (London, Sage) pp. 214-229.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2007) ‘Classification and framing of interviews in ethnographic interviewing. Ethnography and Education, 2, 2, pp. 145-157.
  • Geoffrey Walford and Prachi Srivastava (2007) ‘Examining Private Schooling in Less Economically Developed Countries: Key Issues and New Evidence.’ In Prachi Srivastava and Geoffrey Walford (2007) (eds.) Private Schooling in Less-Economically Developed Countries: Asian and African perspectives (Abingdon, Symposium Books)
  • Geoffrey Walford (2007) ‘Everyone generalizes, but ethnographers should resist doing so.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Methodological Developments in Ethnography (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 12) (Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, Elsevier)
  • Geoffrey Walford (2006) ‘New Christian schools in England: What are the equity mplications?’ International Journal of Learning, 13, 5, pp. 167-176.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2006) ‘From City Technology Colleges to sponsored grant-maintained schools.’ In David Phillips and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) Tracing Education Policy. Selections from the Oxford Review of Education(London, Routledge) pp. 359-375.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2006) ‘Introduction: education and the Labour Government.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Education and the Labour Government. An evaluation of two terms. (London, Routledge).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2005) ‘Learning and the local community: Is community involvement always a good thing?’ International Journal of Learning, 11, pp. 1219-1225.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2005) ‘Research ethical guidelines and anonymity.’ International Journal of Research and Method in Education, 28, 1, pp. 83-93.
  • Holger Daun, Reza Arjmand and Geoffrey Walford (2004) ‘Muslims and education in a global context.’ In Holger Daun and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) Educational Strategies among Muslims in the Context of Globalization. Some National Case Studies. (Leiden, Boston, Brill) pp. 5-36.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2004) ‘Private schooling in England’ (in Chinese) Journal of Non-Government Educational Development, 103, pp. 55-60.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2004) ‘When tradition meets modern law: changing the role of the Oxford University Proctors.’ Research in Education, 72, pp. 103-114.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2004) ‘No discrimination on the basis of irrelevant qualifications.’ Cambridge Journal of Education, 34, 3, pp. 353-361.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2004) ‘Finding the limits: autoethnography and being an Oxford University Proctor.’Qualitative Research, 4, 3, pp. 403-417.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘Country Report on school-based management in England.’ Precedings of the Third International Forum on Educational Reform Education Decentralization Revisited: School-Based Management(Bangkok, Office of the Education Council) pp. 1-23.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘Separate schools for religious minorities in England and the Netherlands: using a framework for the comparison and evaluation of policy.’Research Papers in Education , 18, 3, pp 1-19.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘School choice, educational change and inequality in England.’ In The Organising Committee (eds.) Proceedings of the 37th Annual Conference of the Japan Educational Administration Society(Tokyo, Dojidai Sha, Nichi-nichi Kyoiku Bunko)  pp. 19-49 (in Japanese) pp.147-172 (in English).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘Muslim schools in Britain.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) British Private Schools: research on policy and practice. (London, Woburn Press) pp. 158-174.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘Introduction.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) British Private Schools: research on policy and practice. (London, Woburn Press) pp. 1-8.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘School choice and educational change in England and Wales.’ In  David N. Plank and Gary Sykes (eds.) Choosing Choice: School Choice in International Perspective (New York & London, Teachers College Press) pp. 68-91.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘Education.’ In W. S. F. Pickering (ed.) Durkheim Today, New York, Oxford, Berghahn Books,  pp. 105-115.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘Introduction.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Doing a Doctorate in Educational Ethnography (Studies in  Educational Ethnography, Volume 7) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI, pp. 1-8.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘When policy moves fast, how long can ethnography take?’ In Bradley A. U. Levinson, Sandra L. Cade, Ana Padawer and Ana Patricia Elvir (eds.) Ethnography and Education Policy Across the Americas, Westport, CT, Praeger,  pp. 23-38.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘Why don’t we name our research sites?’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Educational Ethnography and Methodology, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 6) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI, pp. 95-105.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘Educational reform and sociology in England and Wales.’ In David L. Levinson, Peter W. Cookson, Jr., and Alan R. Sadovnik (eds.) Education and Sociology: An Encyclopaedia, New York and London, RoutledgeFalmer, pp. 211-219.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘Classification and framing of the curriculum in evangelical Christian and Muslim schools in England and the Netherlands.’ Educational Studies, 28, 4, pp. 403-419.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘Redefining school effectiveness.’ Westminster Studies in Education, 25, 1, pp. 47-58.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘The state and civil society in education in England: past developments and current problems.’ In Heinz-Dieter Meyer and William Lowe Boyd (eds.) Education between State, Markets, and Civil Society: Comparative perspectives, Mahwah, NJ & London, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, pp. 81-100.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Privatization in industrialized countries.’ In Henry M. Levin (ed.) Privatizing Education. Can the marketplace deliver choice, efficiency, equity, and social cohesion? Boulder, CO  & Oxford, Westview Press, pp. 178-200.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘From common schooling to selection? Affirming and contesting the comprehensive ideal, 1976-2001.’ In Robert Phillips and John Furlong (eds.)  Education, Reform and the State: Politics, Policy and Practice 1976-2001 London & New York, RoutledgeFalmer, pp. 45-57.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Introduction: ethnography and policy.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Ethnography and Education Policy, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 4) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI, pp. 1-9.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Durkheim, democracy and diversity: some thoughts on recent changes in England and Wales.’ In W S F Pickering (ed.) Emile Durkheim: Critical Assessments of Leading Sociologists. Volume VI,London & New York, Routledge, pp. 543-559.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Introduction’ (to Education Section). In W S F Pickering (ed.) Emile Durkheim: Critical Assessments of Leading Sociologists. Volume VI, London & New York, Routledge, pp. 365-371.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Funding for religious schools in England and the Netherlands. Can the piper call the tune?’ Research Papers in Education, 16, 4, pp. 359-380.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Evangelical Christian schools in England and the Netherlands.’  Oxford Review of Education, 27, 4, pp. 529-541.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Building identity through communities of practice: Evangelical Christian schools in the Netherlands.’ International Journal of Education and Religion, 2, 2, pp. 126-143.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘The fate of the new Christian schools: from growth to decline?’ Educational Studies,27, 4, pp. 465-477.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Site selection within comparative case-study and ethnographic research.’ Compare, 31, 2, pp.151-164.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Does the market ensure quality?’ Westminster Studies in Education 24, 1, pp. 23-33.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘School choice and social exclusion in England and Wales.’ In John Sayer and Johan Vanderhoven (eds.) School Choice, Equity and Social Exclusion, Leuven, Garant.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘Introduction.’ In Geoffrey Walford and Caroline Hudson (eds.) Genders and Sexualities in Educational Ethnography, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 3) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI/Elsevier.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘First days in the field: gender and sexuality in an evangelical Christian school.’ In Geoffrey Walford and Caroline Hudson (eds.) Genders and Sexualities in Educational Ethnography, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 3) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI/Elsevier.
  • W S F Pickering and Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘Introduction.’ In W. S.F. Pickering and Geoffrey Walford (eds.)Durkheim’s Suicide: a century of research and debate, London & New York, Routledge, pp. 1-10.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘What’s new about academic capitalism’ Learning & Managing, 6, 2, pp. 174-181.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘Government policy on private schooling in England’ Education and Society, 18, 1, pp. 25-43.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘From City Technology Colleges to sponsored grant-maintained schools’ Oxford Review of Education, 26, 2, pp. 145-158.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘A policy adventure: sponsored grant-maintained schools’ Educational Studies, 26, 2, pp. 247-262.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1999) ‘L’enseignement privé en Angleterre: tendances récentes et problèmes soulevés’Carrefours de l’éducation, 8, pp. 126-139.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1999) ‘Selling your way in: gaining access to research sites.’ In Alexander Massey and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) Explorations in Methodology, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 2)  Stamford, CT, JAI Press,  pp. 1-15.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1999) ‘Educating religious minorities within the English state-maintained sector’International Journal of Educational Management, 13, 2, pp. 98-106.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Durkheim, democracy and diversity: some thoughts on recent changes in England.’ In Geoffrey Walford and W. S. F. Pickering (eds.)  Durkheim and Modern Education, London & New York, Routledge, pp. 125-141.
  • W. S. F. Pickering and Geoffrey Walford (1988) ‘Introduction: Durkheim and education.’ In Geoffrey Walford and W. S. F. Pickering (eds.) Durkheim and Modern Education, London & New York, Routledge, pp. 1-16.
  • Alexander Massey and Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Children learning: Ethnographers learning.’ In Geoffrey Walford and Alexander Massey  (eds.) Children Learning in Context, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 1), Stamford, CT & London, JAI Press, pp. 1-18.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Essay review: Is there a ‘new variant’ diploma disease?’ Oxford Review of Education, 24, 3,  pp. 405-409.
  • David Rigoni and Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Questioning the quick-fix: Assertive Discipline and the 1997 Education White Paper’ Journal of Education Policy, 13, 3, pp. 443-452.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Compulsive writing behaviour: getting it published.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Doing Research About Education, London & Washington D.C., Falmer, pp. 184-198.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Research accounts count.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Doing Research About Education, London & Washington, D.C., Falmer, pp. 1-10.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Reading and writing the small print: The fate of sponsored grant-maintained schools.’  Educational Studies, 24, 2, pp. 241-257.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘School choice and the common good: a reply to Brighouse’ Oxford Review of Education, 23, 4, pp. 517-521.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997)  ‘The 14-19 curriculum in private schools.’ In Sally Tomlinson (ed.) Education 14-19: Critical Perspectives, London & Atlantic Highlands, NJ, Athlone, pp. 101-112.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘Diversity, choice and selection in England and Wales’ Educational Administration Quarterly 33, 2, pp. 158-169.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘Sponsored grant-maintained schools: extending the franchise?’ Oxford Review of Education, 23, 1, pp. 31-44.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘Education and private schools.’ In Anthony Giddens (ed.) Sociology: Introductory readings, Cambridge, Polity, pp. 329-336.
  • Steven Carroll and Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘The child’s voice in school choice’ Educational Management and Administration, 25, 2, pp. 169-180.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘Privatization and selection.’ In Richard Pring and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) Affirming the Comprehensive Ideal, London, Falmer.
  • Steven Carroll and Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘Parents’ responses  to the school quasi-market’ Research Papers in Education, 12, 1, pp. 3-26.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘Power and responsibility in pressure group activity.’ In Keith Watson, Sohan Modgil and Celia Modgil (eds.)  Educational Dilemmas: Debate and diversity, London, Cassell,  pp. 247-253 and 264-265.
  • Steven Carroll and Geoffrey Walford (1996) ‘A panic about school choice’ Educational Studies, 22, 3, pp. 393-407.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1996)  ‘School choice and equity in England and Wales’  Oxford Studies in Comparative Education, 6, 1, pp. 49-62.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1996) ‘Diversity and choice in school education: an alternative view’ Oxford Review of Education,  22, 2, pp. 143-154.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1996)  ‘Faith-based grant-maintained schools: Selective international policy borrowing from The Netherlands’ in John Ahier, Ben Cosin and Margaret Hales (eds.) Diversity and Change: Education, policy and selection, London, Routledge, pp. 63-78.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995)  ‘The Northbourne amendments: Is the House of Lords a garbage can?’ Journal of Education Policy, 10 (5) pp. 413-425.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995) ‘Faith-based schools, diversity and inequity.’ In Gwen Wallace (ed.)  Schools, Markets and Management, Bournmouth, Hyde Publications, pp. 13-20.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995) ‘The Christian Schools Campaign – a successful educational pressure group?’ British Educational Research Journal, 21 (4) pp. 451-464.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995)  ‘Faith-based grant-maintained schools: Selective international policy borrowing from The Netherlands.’ Journal of Education Policy, 10 (2) pp. 245-257.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995) ‘Classification and framing in English public boarding schools.’  In Paul Atkinson, Brian Davies and Sara Delamont (eds.) Discourse and Reproduction. Essays in honor of Basil Bernstein, New Jersey, USA, Hampton Press, pp. 191-207.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994)  ‘A return to selection?’ Westminster Studies in Education, 17, pp. 19-30.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994) ‘Political commitment in the study of the City Technology College, Kingshurst.’  In David Halpin and Barry Troyna (eds.) Researching Education Policy: Ethical and Methodological Issues, London, Falmer, pp. 94-106.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994)  ‘The dilemma of choice in education.’ In Ian Lawrence (ed.) Education Tomorrow, London, Cassell, pp. 130-144.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994)  ‘Reflections on researching the powerful.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Researching the Powerful in Education, London, UCL Press, pp. 222-231.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994)  ‘Ethics and power in a study of pressure group politics.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.)Researching the Powerful in Education, London, UCL Press, pp. 81-93.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994) ‘A new focus on the powerful.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Researching the Powerful in Education, London, UCL Press, pp. 2-11.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994) ‘Educational choice, control and inequity.’ In David Scott (ed.) Accountability and Control in Educational Settings, London, Cassell, pp. 73-86.
  • Colin Poyntz and Geoffrey Walford (1994) ‘The new Christian schools: A survey.’  Educational Studies, 20, 1, pp. 127-143.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994) ‘The new religious grant-maintained schools.’ Educational Management and Administration, 22, 2, pp. 123-130.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994)   ‘Weak choice, strong choice and the new Christian schools.’ In J. Mark Halstead (ed.)  Parental Choice and Education: Principles, policies and practice,  London, Kogan Page, pp. 139-150.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1993)  ‘Self-managing schools, choice and equity.’ In John Smyth (ed.) A Socially Critical View of the Self-Managing School, Basingstoke, Falmer, pp. 229-244.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1993)  ‘Selection for secondary schooling.’  In Briefings for the Paul Hamlyn Foundation National Commission on Education,  London, Heinemann, pp. 89-102.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1993) ‘The real lessons in school reform from Britain.’ Educational Policy, 7, 2, pp. 212-222.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1993) ‘Girls’ private schooling: past and present.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) The Private Schooling of Girls: Past and present, London, Woburn Press, pp. 9-32.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1992)  Selection for Secondary Schooling National Commission on Education Briefing Paper No. 7,  October.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1992) ‘Educational reform in the 1980s: National case studies. Great Britain.’ In Peter W. Cookson, Jr., Alan R. Sadovnik and Susan F. Semel (eds.) International Handbook of Educational Reform, Westport, CT, USA, Greenwood Press, pp. 209-227.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1992) ‘Educational choice and equity in Great Britain.’ Educational Policy (USA), 6, (2) pp. 123-138.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1992) ‘The reform of higher education.’ In Madeline Arnot and Len Barton (eds.)  Voicing Concerns: Sociological Perspectives on contemporary educational reforms, Wallingford, Triangle Books, pp. 186-200.
  • Sharon Gewirtz, Henry Miller and Geoffrey Walford (1991) ‘Parents’ individualist and collectivist strategies at the City Technology College, Kingshurst.’ International Studies in Sociology of Education, 1, pp. 173-191.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991)  ‘The changing relationship between government and higher education in Britain.’  In Guy Neave and Frans van Vught (ed.) Prometheus Bound. The changing relationship between government and higher education in Western Europe, Oxford, Pergamon, pp. 165-183.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991) ‘Researching the City Technology College, Kingshurst.’  In Geoffrey Walford (ed.)Doing Educational Research, London, Routledge, pp. 82-100.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991)  ‘Reflexive accounts of doing educational research.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.)  Doing Educational Research, London, Routledge, pp. 1-17.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991)  ‘Choice of school at the first City Technology College.’ Educational Studies, 17, 1, pp. 65-75.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991)  ‘City Technology Colleges: A private magnetism?’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.)  Private Schooling: Tradition, change and diversity, London, Paul Chapman, pp. 158-76.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991) ‘The reluctant private sector: of small schools, people and politics.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Private Schooling: tradition, change and diversity, London Paul Chapman, pp. 115-32.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1990)  ‘Developing choice in British education.’  Compare. A Journal of Comparative Education, 20, 1, pp 22-56.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1990) ‘The 1988 Education Reform Act for England and Wales: Paths to privatization.’ Educational Policy, 4, 2, pp. 127-44.
  • Mark H. Robson and Geoffrey Walford (1989) ‘Independent schools and tax policy under Mrs Thatcher.’ Journal of Education Policy, 4, 2, pp. 149-62.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1989) ‘Scotland: Changes in government policy towards private schools.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.)  Private Schools in Ten Countries: Policy and practice, London, Routledge, pp. 32-56.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1989)  ‘Private schools policy and practice in comparative perspective.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Private Schools in Ten Countries: Policy and practice, London, Routledge, pp. 1-7.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1989)  ‘Bullying in public schools: Myth and reality.’ In Delwyn P. Tattum and David Lane (eds.) Bullying in Schools, London, Trentham Books, pp. 81-88.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1988)  ‘Young people’s views about the Youth Training Scheme in Scotland.’ British Journal of Sociology of Education, 9, 4, pp. 437-51.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1988)  ‘Shouts of joy and cries of pain: investigating young people’s comments on leaving school and entering the labour market.’ In David Raffe (ed.)  Education and the Youth Labour Market: Schooling and scheming, Lewes, Falmer, pp. 243-65.
  • Geoffrey Walford, June Purvis and Andrew Pollard (1988)  ‘Ethnography, policy and the emergence of the new vocationalism.’  In Andrew Pollard, June Purvis and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) Education, Training and the New Vocationalism: Experience and policy, Milton Keynes, Open University Press, pp. 3-14.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1988) ‘Training the elite – for education, training and jobs.’ Collected Original Resources in Education, 12, 1, pp. 1-19.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1988)  ‘The privatisation of British higher education.’ European Journal of Education, 23, 1/2, pp. 47-64.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1988)  ‘The Scottish Assisted Places Scheme. A comparative study of the origins, nature and practice of the APS in Scotland, England & Wales.’ Journal of Education Policy, 3, 2, pp. 137-53.
  • Mark H. Robson and Geoffrey Walford (1988)  ‘U.K. tax policy and independent schools.’ British Tax Review, 2, pp. 38-54.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1987)  ‘How important is the independent sector in Scotland’ Scottish Educational Review, 19, 2, pp. 108-21.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1987)  ‘How dependent is the independent sector?’ Oxford Review of Education, 13, 3, pp. 275-96.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1987)  ‘Research role conflicts and compromises in public schools.’  In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Doing Sociology of Education, Lewes, Falmer, pp. 45-65.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1987)  ‘The research process.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Doing Sociology of Education, Lewes, Falmer, pp. 1-15.
  • Geoffrey Walford and Sïan Jones (1986) ‘The Solihull adventure. An attempt to reintroduce selective education.’  Journal of Education Policy, 1, 3, pp. 239-53.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1986)  ‘Ruling-class classification and framing.’  British Educational Research Journal, 12, 2, pp. 183-95.
  • Henry Miller and Geoffrey Walford (1986) ‘A case study of financial constraints in British universities.’ IHELG Monograph, Number 86/5, Institute for Higher Education Law and Governance, University of Houston, Texas, USA.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1985)  ‘The influence of external pressure groups on the school curriculum: Two examples.’  Collected Original Resources in Education, 9, 2, pp. 1-45.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1985)  ‘The construction of a curriculum area.’ British Journal of Sociology of Education, 6, 2, pp. 155-71.
  • Henry Miller and Geoffrey Walford (1985)  ‘University cut and thrust.’  In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Schooling in Turmoil, Beckenham, Croom Helm, pp. 244-68.
  • Richard Thompson and Geoffrey Walford (1985)  ‘Teachers learning about industry: The two curricula and cultural disadvantage.’  In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Schooling in Turmoil, Beckenham, Croom Helm, pp. 59-83.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1984)  ‘The changing professionalism of public school teachers.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) British Public Schools: Policy and practice, Lewes, Falmer, pp. 111-35.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1984)   ‘The numbering of postgraduate research.’  Higher Education Review, 16, 2, pp. 61-65.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1983)  ‘Science education and sexism in the Soviet Union.’  School Science Review, 85, 2, pp. 213-24.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1983)  ‘Postgraduate education and the student’s contribution to research.’ British Journal of Sociology of Education, 4, 3, pp. 241-54.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1983) ‘Research state and research style: A sociological analysis of postgraduate education.’  Collected Original Resources in Education, 7, 1, pp. 1-108.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1983)  ‘Science textbook images and the reproduction of sexual divisions in society.’ Research in Science and Technological Education, 1, 1, pp. 65-72.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1983)  ‘Parental attitudes and girls in physical science.’ School Science Review, 64, pp. 566-67.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1983)  ‘Girls in boys’ public schools: A prelude to further research.’ British Journal of Sociology of Education, 4, 1, pp. 39-54.
  • Leo Raby and Geoffrey Walford (1981) ‘Job status aspirations and their determinants for middle and lower stream pupils in an urban, multi-racial comprehensive school.’ British Educational Research Journal, 7, 2, pp. 173-81.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1981)  ‘Classification and framing in higher education.’ Studies in Higher Education, 6, 2, pp. 147-58.
  • Leo Raby and Geoffrey Walford (1981) ‘Career related attitudes and their determinants for middle- and low-stream pupils in an urban, multi-racial comprehensive school.’ Research in Education, 25, pp. 19-35.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1980) ‘Why physics students start doctorates.’ Studies in Higher Education, 5, 1, pp. 77-80.

Books

  • Geoffrey Walford (2006) Markets and Equity in Education London, Continuum, ISBN: 0 8264 8735 1.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2005) Private Education: tradition and continuity
    London, Continuum, ISBN: 0 8264 8599 5.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) Doing Qualitative Educational Research: a personal guide to the research process, London, Continuum. ISBN: 0-8264-4701-5,  0-8264-4702-3.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) Policy, Politics and Education – sponsored grant-maintained schools and religious diversity, Aldershot, Ashgate. ISBN: 0-7456-1031-4.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1996) Public School, Japanese edition of Life in Public Schools, translated by Yo Takeuchi. Japan, Sekai Shisosha Kyogakusha. ISBN: 4-7907-0626-5.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995) Educational Politics: Pressure groups and faith-based schools, Aldershot, Avebury, ISBN: 1-85628-907-9.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994) Choice and Equity in Education, London, Cassell, ISBN: 0-304-32775-1,  0-304-32774-3.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1993) Contemporary British Education and Privatization, Japanese edition of Privatization and Privilege in Education with new forward and postscript, translated by Norio Iwahashi, Kyoto, Japan, Houritu-Bunka-sha, ISBN: 4589-01705-9.
  • Geoffrey Walford and Henry Miller (1991) City Technology College, Milton Keynes, Open University Press, ISBN: 0335 09275 6.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1990) Privatization and Privilege in Education, London & New York, Routledge, ISBN: 0415 04247 X,  0415 04248 8.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1987) Restructuring Universities: Politics and power in the management of change, Beckenham, Croom Helm, ISBN: 07099 3694 X.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1986) Life in Public Schools, London, Methuen, ISBN: 0416 37170 1,  0416 37180 9.
  • Richard Thompson and Geoffrey Walford (1983) Teachers into Industry, Birmingham, AEEM, ISBN: 0903 703 14 9.

Edited books

  • Prachi Srivastava and Geoffrey Walford (2018) Non-State Actors in Education in the Global South. London, Routledge. ISBN: 978-1-138-57067-2 (hb), 143 pp.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2016)(ed.) Academies, Free Schools and social Justice (Didcot, Routledge) ISBN 13: 978-1-138-96007-7, 118 pp.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2016)(ed.) Privatization, Education and Social Justice (Didcot, Routledge) ISBN 13: 978-1-138-59439-7, 150 pp.
  • Ian Macpherson, Susan Robertson and Geoffrey Walford (eds.)(2014) Education, Privatisation, and Social Justice: Case studies from Africa, South Asia, and South East Asia (Abingdon, Symposium)
  • Geoffrey Walford, Eric Tucker and Madhu Viswanathan (2010) (eds.) The Sage Handbook of Measurement (London, Sage) ISBN: 978-1-4129-4814-2.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2010) (ed.) Blair’s Educational Legacy? (London, Routledge) ISBN: 0-415-48305-0.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) (ed.) How to do Educational Ethnography, London, Tufnell Press, ISBN: 978-1-872767-92-5 (pb).
  • Martin Forsey, Scott Davies and Geoffrey Walford (2008(eds.) The Globalisation of School VChoice? Abingdon, Symposium Books, ISBN: 978-1-873927-12-0 (pb).
  • Prachi Srivastava and Geoffrey Walford (2007) (eds.) Private Schooling in Less-Economically Developed Countries: Asian and African Perspectives Abingdon, Symposium Books. ISBN: 978-1-873927-85-4 (pb).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2007) (ed.) Methodological Developments in Ethnography (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 12) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, Elsevier.  ISBN: 0-7623-1437-0 (hb).
  • David Phillips and Geoffrey Walford (2006) (eds.) Tracing Education Policy: Selections for the Oxford Review of Education Abingdon, Routledge. ISBN: 0-413-39861-4 (hb).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2006) (ed.) Education and the Labour Government: an evaluation of two termsAbingdon, Routledge. ISBN: 0 415 36870 7 (hb).
  • Geoff Troman, Bob Jeffrey and Geoffrey Walford (2005) (eds.) Methodological issues and practices in Ethnography. (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 11) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, Elsevier.  ISBN: 0-7623-1252-1 (hb).
  • Geoff Troman, Bob Jeffrey and Geoffrey Walford (2004) (eds.) Identity, Agency, and Social Institutions in Educational Ethnography. (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 10) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, Elsevier. ISBN: 0-7623-1144-4 (hb).
  • Bob Jeffrey and Geoffrey Walford (2004) (eds.)Ethnographies of Educational and Cultural Conflicts: Strategies and resolutions. (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 9) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, Elsevier. ISBN: 07623-11126 (hb).
  • Holger Daun and Geoffrey Walford (2004) (eds.) Educational Strategies among Muslims in the Context of Globalization. Leiden, Brill. ISBN: 90-04-13675-4 (hb).
  • Geoffrey Walford and W. S. F. Pickering (2003) (ed.) Durkheim and Modern Education, Japanese Edition. Tokyo, Tokyo Metropolitan University Press. ISBN: 4-88683-496-5 (hb).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) (ed.) British Private Schools: research on policy and practice, London, Woburn Press. ISBN: 0-7130-0228-X,  0-7130-4048-3.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) (ed.) Investigating Educational Policy through Ethnography, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume  Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-1018-9 (hb).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) (ed.) Doing a Doctorate in Educational Ethnography, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 7) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-0906-7 (hb).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) (ed.) Debates and Developments in Ethnographic Methodology, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 6) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-0893-1.
  • Phil Carspecken and Geoffrey Walford (2001) (eds.) Critical Educational Ethnography,
    (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 5) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-0797-8.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) (ed.) Ethnography and Education Policy, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 4) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-0768-4.
  • Geoffrey Walford and Caroline Hudson (2000) (eds.) Genders and Sexualities in Educational Ethnography, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 3) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-0738-2.
  • W. S. F. Pickering and Geoffrey Walford (2000) (eds.) Durkheim’s Suicide: a century of research and debate, London & New York, Routledge. ISBN: 0-415-20582-4.
  • Alexander Massey and Geoffrey Walford (1999) (eds.) Explorations in Methodology, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 2) Stamford, CT, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-0563-0.
  • Geoffrey Walford and Alexander Massey (1998) (eds.) Children Learning in Context, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 1). London & Greenwich, CT, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-76230-436-7.
  • Geoffrey Walford and W. S. F. Pickering (1998) (eds.) Durkheim and Modern Education, London & New York, Routledge. ISBN: 0-415-18168-2.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1998) (ed.) Doing Research about Education, London & Washington D.C., Falmer. ISBN: 0-7507-0782-8,  0-7507-0783-6.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) (ed.) Choice, Diversity and Equity in Secondary Schooling, Special Issue of Oxford Review of Education. ISSN:  0305-4985 .
  • Richard Pring and Geoffrey Walford (1997) (eds.) Affirming the Comprehensive Ideal, London & Washington D.C., Falmer. ISBN: 0-7507-0619-8,  0-7507-0620-1.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1996) (ed.) School Choice and the Quasi-Market, Special Issue of Oxford Studies in Comparative Education, Wallingford, Triangle Books. ISBN: 1-873927-23-1.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995) (ed.) La Otra Cara de la Investigación Educativa, Spanish edition of Doing Educational Research, translated by Javier Orduna Cosmen. Madrid, La Muralla. ISBN: 84-7133-646-4.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994) (ed.) Researching the Powerful in Education, London, UCL Press, ISBN: 1-85728-133-0, 1-85728-134-9.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1993) (ed.) The Private Schooling of Girls: Past and present, London, Woburn Press, ISBN: 0-7130-0186-0.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1992) (ed.) Privatne Skole. Iskustva u deset zemalja, Croatian edition of Private Schools in Ten Countries, translated by Mirna Varlandy Supek, Zagreb, Croatia, EDUCA Publishing House, ISBN: 86-7841-002-7.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991) (ed.) Doing Educational Research, London, Routledge, ISBN: 0415 05289 0,  0415 05290 4.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991) (ed.) Private Schooling: Tradition, change and diversity, London, Paul Chapman, ISBN: 185396 116 7.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1989) (ed.) Private Schools in Ten Countries: Policy and practice, London & New York, Routledge, ISBN: 0415 03464 7.
  • Andrew Pollard, June Purvis and Geoffrey Walford (1988) (eds.) Education, Training and the New Vocationalism: experience and policy, Milton Keynes & Philadelphia, Open University Press, ISBN: 0335 15845 5,  0335 15844 7.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1987) (ed.) Doing Sociology of Education, Lewes & Philadelphia, Falmer, ISBN: 085000 145 6,  085000 146 4.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1985) (ed.) Schooling in Turmoil, Beckenham, Croom Helm, ISBN: 07099 3618 4.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1984) (ed.) British Public Schools: Policy and practice,
    Lewes & Philadelphia, Falmer, ISBN: 0905 273 84 2,  0905 273 83 4.

Anne’s main areas of research in Mathematics Education are exemplification and task design in mathematics teaching and learning, from a variation theory perspective; the role of mathematics education in social justice issues; the use of fine-grained approaches to analysis of mathematics interaction within socio-cultural perspectives and the school mathematics curriculum.

Detailed information, papers, presentations and activities can be found on her website at pmtheta.com and on researchgate.net.

Anne convened and co-edited an Study on Task Design for the International Committee on Mathematics Education and has co-authored a book about learning key ideas in secondary mathematics – Key Ideas in Teaching Mathematics for Oxford University Press.

Her most recent publication is the book: Care in Mathematics Education published by Palgrave-Macmillan.

She is a member of the Association of Teachers of Mathematics (ATM), the British Society for Research into the Learning of Mathematics, the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education and the Higher Education Academy and the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group. She is a Fellow of the International Society for Design and Development in Education.  In retirement she runs, with her husband John Mason, free workshops for teachers and others on key conceptual themes that run throughout mathematics (see pmtheta@home on pmtheta.com).

Anne is a member of the Quaker Values in Education Group of the Society of Friends, see: Rowe, D. and Watson, A. (eds.) (2018)  Faith and Experience in Education: essays on Quaker perspectives. London: Trentham Press.

Activities in curriculum
  • Two syntheses of research about how children learn mathematics for the Nuffield Foundation: Key Understandings in Learning Mathematics (with Nunes and Bryant) and Key Ideas in Teaching Mathematics (with Jones and Pratt).
  • Member of the expert drafting panel for the primary and secondary mathematics National Curriculum for the Department for Education.
  • Curriculum Advisor to the Welsh Assembly.
Publications
Selected recent papers
  • Biza, I., Hewitt, A., Watson, A., Mason, J. (2019) Generalization Strategies in Finding the nth Term Rule for Simple Quadratic Sequences. International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, (), 1-22 DOI 10.1007/s10763-019-10009-0
  • Venkat, H., Askew, M., Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2019) Architecture of Mathematical Structure. FLM 39(1), 19-23.
  • Biza, I., Hewitt, A., Watson, A., Mason, J. (2019) Generalization Strategies in Finding the nth Term Rule for Simple Quadratic Sequences. International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, (), 1-22 DOI 10.1007/s10763-019-10009-0
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018) A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice.  73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • Al-Murani, T., Kilhamn, C., Morgan, D., & Watson, A. (2018). Opportunities for learning: the use of variation to analyse examples of a paradigm shift in teaching primary mathematics in England. Research in Mathematics Education, 1-19.
  • Watson, A., Ayalon, M., & Lerman, S. (2018). Comparison of students’ understanding of functions in classes following English and Israeli national curricula. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 97(3), 255-272.
  • Ayalon, M., Watson, A. & Lerman, S. (2016) Students’ conceptualisations of function revealed through definitions and examples. Research in Mathematics Education. 19(1), 1-19
  • Watson, A. (2016) Pedagogy of variations: synthesis of various notions of variation pedagogy in Huang, R. & Li, Y. (eds.) Teaching and learning mathematics through variation. p85-105. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers
  • Ayalon, M., Watson, A. & Lerman, S. (2016) Reasoning about variables in 11 to 18 year olds: informal, schooled and formal expression in learning about functions. Mathematics Education Research Journal. 28(3), 379-404.
  • Ayalon, M., Watson, A., & Lerman, S. (2015). Progression Towards Functions: Students’ Performance on Three Tasks About Variables from Grades 7 to 12. International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, 90(3), 321-339
  • Ayalon, M., Watson, A. and Lerman, S. (2015) Functions represented as linear sequential data: relationships between presentation and student responses Educational Studies in Mathematics.Online DOI 10.1007/s10649-015-9628-9
  • Watson, A. and Ohtani, M. (2015) Themes and issues in mathematics education concerning task design: Editorial introduction. In Watson, A. and Ohtani, M. (eds.) Task Design in Mathematics Education: An ICMI study.  (pp. 3-18 ) Heidelberg: Springer
  • Watson, A. and Thompson, D. (2015) Design issues related to text-based tasks. In Watson, A. and Ohtani, M. (eds.) Task Design in Mathematics Education: An ICMI study.  (pp.143-190) Heidelberg: Springer.
  • Watson, A., De Geest, E. (2014) Department-initiated change. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(3), 351-368.
Selected Books
  • Watson, A. (2021) Care in Mathematics Education: Alternative educational spaces and practices. Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Watson, A. (ed.) (2018) Variation in mathematics: A collection of writings from ATM Mathematics Teaching. Association of Teachers of Mathematics, Derby, UK.
  • Watson, A. and Ohtani, M. (2015) (Eds.) Task Design in Mathematics Education: An ICMI study.  Heidelberg: Springer.
  • Watson, A.,  Jones, K. and Pratt, D. (2013)  Key Ideas in Teaching Mathematics: Research-based guidance for ages 9-19 (Oxford University Press + Nuffield website)
  • Watson and P. Winbourne (eds.) (2007) New Directions for Situated Cognition in Learning Mathematics, pub. Springer
  • Watson, A. (2006) Raising Achievement in Secondary Mathematics Maidenhead, Open University Press
  • Watson, A. and Mason, J. (2005) Mathematics as a constructive activity: learners generating examples. Lawrence Erlbaum Publishers.

David Phillips is Emeritus Professor of Comparative Education, and Emeritus Fellow of St Edmund Hall.

A linguist by origin, David Phillips now works exclusively on various aspects of comparative and international education, with a particular focus on policy issues in historical context. He is the author of many publications, especially on education in Germany (more particularly in the post-war and post-unification periods) and on policy ‘borrowing’ in education. He has edited  Comparative Education, Research in Comparative and International Education, and the Oxford Review of Education and  and serves on the editorial boards of various other journals; he also edits the book series Oxford Studies in Comparative Education. He is co-chair of the Anglo-German Educational Research Group (www.aerg.org)

He has been Chair of the British Association for Comparative and International Education (BAICE). In 1990-91 he served on a commission of the German Wissenschaftsrat which reported to the German government on the future of teacher education in the territory of the former German Democratic Republic, and he has (2003-4) been a member of a commission appointed by the Minister for Science, Culture and the Arts in Baden-Württemberg with the task of evaluating educational studies in higher education in that state of the Federal Republic of Germany. He has evaluated projects for the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft and for other research bodies. He is a Fellow of the Social Sciences Academy and a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society.

Professor Phillips’s main teaching involved theoretical and methodological issues in comparative education, educational policy in Western Europe (particularly EU countries) and in Eastern Europe, in Japan, and in the United States. Many of his doctoral students focused on education in Germany and Japan, and on a range of topics involving education and training policy in the European Union as well as on aspects of educational policy borrowing in a variety of contexts.

Publications
  • Zur Universitätsreform in der Britischen Besatzungszone 1945-1948, Böhlau 1983
  • (Editor): Hochschuloffiziere und Wiederaufbau des Hochschulwesens in Westdeutschland 1945-1952, Teil 1: Die Britische Zone, Lax, 1990
  • (Editor): Lessons of Cross-National Comparison in Education, Triangle Books, 1992
  • (Editor, with Michael Kaser): Education and Economic Change in Eastern Europe, Triangle Books, 1992
  • Pragmatismus und Idealismus: Das ‘Blaue Gutachten’ und die Britische Hochschulpolitik in Deutschland 1948, Böhlau, 1995
  • (Editor, with others): Education for Reconstruction, Symposium Books, 1998
  • (Editor): Education in Germany: Tradition and Reform in Historical Context, Routledge, 1995
  • (Editor, with Michael Kaser): Aspects of Education and the European Union, Triangle Books, 1995
  • (Editor, with others): Learning From Comparing: New Directions in Comparative Educational Research , Vol. 1, Contexts, Classrooms and Outcomes, Symposium Books, 1999 (with Robin Alexander and Patricia Broadfoot); Vol.2, Policy, Professionals and Development,: Symposium Books, 2000 (with Robin Alexander and Marilyn Osborn)
  • (Editor): Education in Eastern Germany Since Unification, Symposium Books, 2000
  • ‘Reconstructing Education in Germany: Some Similarities and Contrasts in the Post-War and Post-Unification Rethinking in Educational Provision’, in: Leslie J. Limage (ed): Democratizing Education and Educating Democratic Citizens: International and Historical Perspectives, New York (Routledge/Falmer), 2001
  • ‘Helena Deneke and the Women of Germany. A Note on Post-War Reconstruction’, German Life and Letters, Vol.53 No.1, 2000
  • Reflections on British Interest in Education in Germany in the Nineteenth Century. (A Progress Report), Educa, Lisbon, 2002
  • ‘Comparative Historical Studies in Education: Problems of Periodisation Reconsidered’, British Journal of Educational Studies, Vol.50, No.3, 2002
  • ‘Beyond Travellers’ Tales: Some Nineteenth-Century British Commentators on Education in Germany’, Oxford Review of Education, Vol.26 No.1, 2000
  • ‘Comparative Studies and “Cross-National Attraction” in Education: a typology for the analysis of English interest in educational policy and provision in Germany, Educational Studies, Vol.28, No.4, 2002 (with Kimberly Ochs)
  • ‘Processes of Policy Borrowing in Education: Some Explanatory and Analytical Devices, (with Kimberly Ochs), Comparative Education, Vol. 39, No.4, 2003
  • (Editor, with Roger Goodman): Can the Japanese Change Their Education System? Symposium Books, 2003
  • (Editor, with Hubert Ertl): Implementing European Union Education and Training Policy: A Comparative Study of Issues in Four Member States, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2003
  • Articles on ‘Helena Deneke’, ‘Evelyn Spearing’, and ‘Edith Wardale’, New Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004
  • ‘Researching Policy Borrowing: Some Methodological Problems in Comparative Education’, British Educational Research Journal, Vol.30 No.6, 2004 (with Kimberly Ochs)
  • ‘A Typology of Cross-National Attraction in Education’, in: Gita Steiner-Khamsi (ed.): The Global Politics of Educational Borrowing and Lending, Teachers College Press, 2004
  • (Editor, with Kimberly Ochs): Educational Policy Borrowing: Historical Perspectives, Symposium Books, 2004
  • ‘Policy Borrowing in Education: Frameworks for Analysis’, in: Joseph Zajda (ed.): International Handbook on Globalisation, Education and Policy Research: Global Pedagogies and Policies, Springer, 2005
  • ‘Comparative Education: An Approach to Educational Inquiry’, in: Clifton Conrad and Ronald Serlin (eds.): The Sage Handbook on Research in Education: Engaging Ideas and Enriching Inquiry, Sage, 2005
  • ‘Michael Sadler and Comparative Education’, Oxford Review of Education, Vol. 32, No.1, 2006
  • Comparative and International Education: An Introduction to Theory, Method and Practice, Continuum, 2006 (with Michele Schweisfurth)
  • (Editor): Special issue of Comparative Education on ‘Mapping EU Education and Training Policy’, Vol.42, No.1, 2006
  • (Editor): Special issue of Oxford Review of Education on ‘Comparative Inquiry and Educational Policy Making’, Vol.42, No.3, 2006
  • The German Example: English Interest in Educational Provision in Germany Since 1800, Continuum 2011
  • ‘Aspects of Education for Democratic Citizenship in Post-War Germany, Oxford Review of Education, Vol.38, No.6, 2012
  • Investigating Education in Germany: Historical Studies from a British Perspective, Routledge 2015
  • Educating the Germans. People and Policy in the British Zone of Germany, 1945-1949, 2018
Research

David Phillips’s main research interests are in education in Germany, transition in education in eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, educational policy ‘borrowing’, theoretical perspectives in comparative education, and EU education and training policy.

Much of David Phillips’s recent research has been in the area of educational policy borrowing and in EU education and training policy. He recently (1998-2002 inclusive) directed a five-year EU-funded project (PRESTIGE – ‘Problems of Educational Standardisation and Transition in a Global environment’) in this latter area, and oversaw and contributed to the many publications which emerged from the project. Currently the focus of his work is on British interest in educational provision in Germany over the past 200 years. In 2005, together with Alis Oancea, he organised an international seminar funded by the European Science Foundation on the subject ‘15 Years On: Post-communist transitions and European integration of central and eastern European Countries’.

One of his recent books is The German Example: English Interest in Educational Provision in Germany Since 1800 (Continuum,2011), and he has most recently published Educating the Germans, a study of British educational policy in occupied Germany, 1945-1949.  The research for this book was supported by a Leverhulme Trust Emeritus Fellowship awarded in 2012. In 2015 Routledge published Investigating Education in Germany: Historical Studies from a British Perspective. 

Professor of Sociology of Education in the Department of Education from 2010-2015, and before that Director of the Centre for Educational Sociology (CES), University of Edinburgh, Jenny also worked at Strathcyde, Keele, UWE Bristol, and the Open University.

She is an Honorary Professorial Visiting Fellow in the School of Social and Political Sciences, the University of Edinburgh, and has an attachment to the University of Umea, Sweden. She is a Fellow of the British Academy and has been a visiting scholar at Helsinki University, Finland. She holds an honorary doctorate from Turku University, Finland and is a member of the ESF College of Expert Reviewers. She teaches on the EU funded summer school in European Education Studies (SUSEES). The MOOC may be accessed here http://www.susees.eu/mooc-2017-lecture-2-governing-education-europe-changing-role-knowledge/

Research

Jenny’s most recent funded research was a Leverhulme Emeritus Fellowship, on Governing Education: knowledge and policy in England and Scotland since 1986. The study investigates the changing relationship between knowledge and policy in governing education in the period 1986-2015 in England and Scotland.

Jenny also continues to research and publish on education policy with a focus on governance and governing, through investigation of the resources that are being mobilized by new governing forms and through new policy technologies. She works in collaboration with colleagues in the UK and Europe, located in a variety of disciplines-including political science and social policy.

Publications
Recent books
  • Ozga, J (2016) (ed) Sage Library of Educational Thought and Practice: Sociology of Education (four volumes)
  • Fenwick. T., Mangez, E., and Ozga.J. (Eds) (2014) Governing Knowledge: Comparison, Knowledge-Based Technologies and Expertise in the Regulation of Education, (World Yearbook of Education 2014) London, Routledge
  • 2011: Fabricating Quality in Europe: data and education governance (edited with Peter Dahler-Larsen, Christina Segerholm and Hannu Simola London, Routledge
  • 2007: Lingard, B and Ozga, J (eds) The Routledge Reader in Education Policy and Politics, London, Routledge.
  • 2006: Ozga, J. Seddon T and Popkewitz T.S. (eds) Research and Policy: steering the knowledge-based Economy (World Yearbook of Education 2006) London, Routledge
Recent articles
  • Ozga, Jenny (2021) Problematising policy: the development of (critical) policy sociology, Critical Studies in Education, 62:3, 290-305, DOI: 10.1080/17508487.2019.1697718
  • Ozga, Jenny (2021) Who governs? Political leadership in transnational times, School Leadership & Management, 41:1-2, 6-21, DOI: 10.1080/13632434.2020.1789857
  • Ozga, Jenny (2020) The politics of accountability. Journal of Educational Change 21, 19–35 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10833-019-09354-2
  • Ozga, Jenny, & Arnott, M. A. (2019). Governando para além do PISA: conhecimento, redes e narrativas. [Governing Beyond PISA: knowledge, networks and narratives] Roteiro,44(3), 1-22. https://doi.org/10.18593/r.v44i3.21004
  • Ozga, J (2017) ‘Education policy should not be driven by performance data’ Nature: Human Behaviour Vol 1 Issue 1 http://www.nature.com/articles/s41562-016-0014
  • Ozga, Jenny (2016) Trust in numbers? Digital Education Governance and the inspection process  European Educational Research Journal Vol. 15(1) 69–81
  • Margaret Arnott & Jenny Ozga (2016) Education and nationalism in Scotland: governing a ‘learning nation’, Oxford Review of Education, 42:3, 253-265, DOI: 10.1080/03054985.2016.1184865
  • Ozga J and Lawn, M (2014) Frameworks of Regulation: Evidence, Knowledge and Judgement in Inspection Introduction to Special issue of Sisyphus, Journal of Education Volume 2 Issue 1 pp 7-16 (available at http://revista.rcap.pt/sisyphus)
  • Ozga, J (2014) Knowledge, Inspection and the Work of Governing Special issue of Sisyphus, Journal of Education Volume 2 Issue 1 pp16-40 (available at http://revista.rcap.pt/sisyphus)
  • Ozga, J and Lawn, M (2014) Inspectorates and Politics-the trajectories of inspection in England and Scotland  Revue Francaise de Pedagogie 186 pp11-23
  • Ozga, J Baxter, J, Clarke, J. Grek, S and Lawn M (2013) ‘The Politics of Educational Change: Governing and School Inspection in England and Scotland’ Swiss Journal of Sociology 39(2) 205-224.
  • Ozga J (2013) ‘Accountability as a Policy Technology: accounting for education performance in Europe’ International Review of Administrative Science 79 (2) 292-309.
  • Grek, S Lawn, M Ozga, J and Segerholm, C (2013) ‘Governing by Inspection? European Inspectorates and the creation of a European Education Policy Space Comparative Education, 49 (4) 486-502
  • Grek S and Ozga J (2012) Governing through Learning: School Self-Evaluation as a Knowledge-based Regulatory Tool. Recherches sociologiques et anthropologiqes 2012/2 83-103
  • Ozga J (2012) ‘Governing knowledge: data, inspection and education policy in Europe’ Globalisation, Societies and Education
  • Ozga J (2011) Knowledge Stocks and Flows: Data and Education Governance in Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities (Eds) Tara Fenwick and Lesley Farrell, London Routledge
  • Ozga J (2011) Governing Narratives: ‘local’ meanings and globalising education policy Education Inquiry 2 (2) June pp 305-318
  • Ozga J (2011) ‘Knowledge Transfer and Transformation: moving knowledge from research to policy’  PERSPECTIVA, Florianópolis, v. 29, n. 1, 49-67, jan./jun. 2011
  • Ozga J (2011) Researching the Powerful: Seeking Knowledge about Policy European Educational Research Journal Volume 10 Number 2 2011 pp 218-224
  • Arnott, M.A. & Ozga, J. (2010) ‘Nationalism, Governance and Policy Making: The SNP in Power’ Public Money and Management, vol.30 no.2 pp.91-97
  • Arnott, M. and Ozga J. (2010) Education and Nationalism: the discourse of education policy in Scotland Discourse 31(3 ) 335-350
  • Grek S and Ozga J (2010) Governing Education through Data: Scotland, England and the European Education Policy Space British Education Research Journal 36 (6) 937-952
  • Grek, S. and Ozga, J. (2010) ‘Re-inventing Public Education: the new role of knowledge in education policy-making’, Public Policy and Administration 25 (3) 271-288
  • Ozga, J. (2009) Governing Education through Data in England: From Regulation to Self-Evaluation, Special Issue of Journal of Education Policy, 24(2) 149-163
  • Grek, S.,Lawn M, Lingard, B Ozga, J. Rinne, R., Segerholm, C.and Simola, H. (2009) ‘National policy brokering and the construction of the European Education Space in England, Sweden, Finland and Scotland’  Comparative Education 45(1) 5-22
  • Ozga J (2008) Governing Knowledge: research steering and research quality, European  Educational Research Journal, 7(3), pp.261-272.
  • Byrne D and Ozga J (2008) Education Research and Policy Research Papers in Education, 23(4), pp.377-407
  • Ozga, J (2007) Knowledge and Policy: Research and Knowledge Transfer Critical Studies in Education 48 (1) pp63-78
Recent book chapters
  • Ozga, Jenny (2020) Elites and Expertise: The Changing Material Production of Knowledge for Policy in Fan, Guorui and Popkewitz, Thomas (Eds.) Handbook of Education Policy Studies volume 1 Values, Governance, Globalization, and Methodology (https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9789811383465)
  • Ozga, J (2019) ‘Governing and Knowledge: Theorising the Relationship’ in Langer, R and Brusemeister, T Handbuch Educational Governance Theorien Springer
  • Ozga J (2017) ‘Education and Nationalism in Scotland: nationalism as a governing resource’ in Kantasalmi, K and Holm, G (eds) The State, Schooling and Identity Singapore, Palgrave Macmillan/Springer
  • Ozga, Jenny (2015) Working Knowledge: Data, Expertise and Inspection in the Governing of Education in Kotthoff H-G and Klerides, E (eds) Governing Educational Spaces Knowledge, Teaching, and Learning in Transition Rotterdam, Sense Publishers  pp 15-35 https://www.sensepublishers.com/media/2526-governing-educational-spaces.pdf
  • Ozga J and Dubois-Shaik F (2015) ‘Referencing Europe:usages  of Europe in National Identity Projects’ in Carter, C and Lawn, M (eds) Governing Europe’s Spaces: European Union Re-imagined Manchester, Manchester University Press
  • Ozga J and Segerholm C (2015) Neo-Liberal Agendas in Education in Grek, S and Lindgren, J (eds) Governing by Inspection Routledge pp27-38
  • Ozga J, Lawn M (2015) The History and Development of Inspectorates in England, Sweden and Scotland in Grek, S and Lindgren, J (eds) Governing by Inspection Routledge pp58-74
  • Lawn M and Ozga J (2012) Making Good Progress? Governing by Inspection: a post-comparative approach. Helsinki, Finnish Education Research Association.
  • Arnott M and Ozga J  (2012) ‘Education, Nationalism and Social Justice in Scott, G. & Mooney, G. (eds) Social Justice and Social Policy: the Politics of Social Policy in Scotland, Bristol, Policy Press
  • Ozga J (2012) ‘Trans-national Technologies and National Contexts: a Comparative Analysis of Education Policy in Scotland and England’ in Kauko, J Rinne R & Kynkäänniemi H (eds) Restructuring the Truth of Schooling – Essays on Discursive Practices in Sociology and the Politics of Education Helsinki, Finnish Educational Research Association
  • Arnott m and Ozga J (2010) ‘Education Policy & the SNP Government’ in Scott, G. & Mooney, G. (eds) (2010) Politics of Social Policy in Scotland, Policy Press

Ian is former President of BERA, 2013-2015. At OUDE he was Director of Professional Programmes and led the development of the Oxford Education Deanery.Before moving to Oxford, Ian was Professor of Teacher Education at the University of Glasgow. Prior to that he held posts at the University of the West of Scotland (Dean of Education and Media), London Metropolitan University (Head of School of Education), University of the West of England and the University of Gloucestershire.

Ian was President of the Scottish Educational Research Association from 2005–07 and chaired the Research and Development Committee of the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers from 2008-11. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts and is a Visiting Professor at Bath Spa University and Ulster University and an Honorary Professor at the University of Exeter. Since 2018 he has been a Senior Research Associate at Kazan Federal University, Russia.

Publications
Books
  • Menter, I., Muschamp, Y., Nicholls, P., Ozga, J. with Pollard, A. (1997) Work and Identity in the Primary School: A Post-Fordist Analysis Buckingham: Open University Press
  • Menter, I., Brisard, E. and Smith, I. (2006) Convergence or Divergence?: Initial teacher education in Scotland and England Edinburgh: Dunedin Academic Press.
  • Menter, I. and Murray, J. (eds.) (2011) Developing Research in Teacher Education, London: Routledge.
  • Menter, I., Elliot, D., Hulme, M., Lewin, J. and Lowden, K. (2011) A Guide to Practitioner Research in Education, London: Sage.
  • The Teacher Education Group (2015) Teacher Education in Times of Change. Bristol: Policy Press.
  • Peters, M., Cowie, B and Menter, I. (eds.) (2017) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education Research. Singapore: Springer.
  • Childs, A. and Menter, I. (eds.) (2018) Mobilising Teacher Researchers: challenging educational inequality. London: Routledge
  • Tatto, M.T. and Menter, I. (eds.) (2019) Knowledge, Policy and Practice in Teacher Education – A Cross-National Study. London: Bloomsbury.
Recent research reports
  • 2009 Final Report Curriculum for Excellence Draft Experiences and Outcomes: Collection, analysis and reporting of data for Learning and Teaching Scotland (Menter, I., Baumfield, V., Hulme, M., Devlin, A., Ellott, D., Hall, J., Hall, S. and Lowden, K.)
  • 2010 ‘Teachers: formation, training and identity’ (A literature review for Culture, Creativity and Education) (Menter, I.)
  • 2010 Literature Review on Teacher Education in the 21stCentury, Edinburgh: The Scottish Government. (Menter, I.,Hulme, M., Elliot, D. and Lewin, J.)
  • 2010 Research to support Schools of Ambition: Final Report, Edinburgh: The Scottish Government (Menter, I., Hulme, M., Christie, D., Payne, F., Coutts, N., Robson, D. and Spratt, J.)
  • 2011 Research to support Schools of Ambition: Final Report, Edinburgh: The Scottish Government (Menter, I., Hulme, M., Christie, D., Payne, F., Coutts, N., Robson, D. and Spratt, J.)
  • 2011 The Glasgow West Teacher Education Initiative: A Clinical Approach to Teacher Education. Evaluation Report. (Menter. I., Baumfield, V., Carroll, M., Dickson, B., Hulme, M., Lowden, K. and Mallon, W.) University of Glasgow.
  • 2012 The Glasgow West Teacher Education Initiative: Evaluation of second phase. Menter, I. and Lowden, K. Glasgow: The University of Glasgow.
  • 2013 Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools, funded by Citi Foundation (Aexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. and Menter, I.)
  • 2017 The role and contribution of higher education in contemporary teacher education. (Menter, I.) Commissioned by the Scottish Council of Deans of Education.
Recent book chapters
  • Menter, I. (2016) Teacher education – making connections with curriculum, pedagogy and assessment. In: Wyse, D., Hayward, L. and Pandya, J. (Eds.) The Sage Handbook of Curriculum, Pedagogy and Assessment. London: SAGE. pp 1015-1028.
  • Menter, I. (2016) ‘Foreword’ to Beckett, L. Teachers and Academic Partners in Urban Schools. London: Routledge.
  • Menter, I. and Walker, M. (2016) ‘School and society’ in Wyse, D. and Rogers, S. (Eds.) A Guide to Early Years and Primary Teaching. London: Sage.
  • Menter, I. (2016) Teacher education: generator of change or a mechanism for conformity? in Lees, H. and Noddings, N. (eds.) The Palgrave International Handbook of Alternative Education. London: Palgrave. 257-272.
  • Menter, I. (2017) ‘Reasons for education research’. In Wyse, D., Selwyn, N., Smith, E. and Suter, L. (Eds.) The BERA/SAGE Handbook of Educational Research. London: Sage. pp. 37-52.
  • Menter, I. (2017) ‘Diversity, development, devolution: the three Ds of UK teacher education and professional development in the twenty-first century’. In Florian, L. and Pantic, N. (Eds.) Teacher Education for the Changing Demographics of Schooling – Issues for research and practice. Cham, Switzerland: Springer. pp39-51.
  • Menter, I. (2017) ‘Teacher Education Research’ In Oxford Encyclopedia of Education. Oxford University Press. DOI: 10.1093/acrefore/9780190264093.013.275
  • Menter, I. (2018) ‘Teacher education in a crucible of change’ in Smith, L. and Wyatt, C. (Eds.) Innovation and Accountability in Teacher Education: Setting directions for new cultures in teacher education. Singapore: Springer. pp313-326.
  • Menter, I. and Reynolds, K. (2019) ‘Diversity in Teacher Education: Afterword’ In Sorensen, N. (Ed.) Diversity in Teacher Education. London: UCL IoE Books.
Recent journal articles
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. and Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: The Development of the Oxford Education Deanery Narrative. Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373.
  • Menter, I. (2015) Unity or disunity in the United Kingdom? Policy and practice in teacher education. Education and Self-Development. 2 (44),156-164.
  • Thompson, I., McNicholl, J. and Menter, I. (2016) Student teachers’ perceptions of poverty and educational achievement, Oxford Review of Education 42, 2, 214-229 DOI: 10.1080/03054985.2016.1164130
  • Menter, I. (2016) Helga Eng lecture 2015: What is a teacher in the 21st century and what does a 21st century teacher need to know? Acta Didactica Norge,10, 2, 11-25.
  • Lynch, D., Smith, R. and Menter, I. (2016) Reforming teacher education: from partnership to ‘syndication’. International Journal of Innovation, Creativity and Change. www.ijicc.net Volume 2, Issue 3.
  • Mutton, T., Burn, K. and Menter, I. (2017) Deconstructing the Carter Review: Competing conceptions of quality in England’s ‘school-led’ system of initial teacher education. Journal of Education Policy. 32, 1, 14-33. DOI: 10.1080/02680939.2016.1214751
  • Menter, I. (2017) Competences and Standards for Teachers and Teacher Education – Developments and Problems – a common approach for the United Kingdom? 26th Bulletin of the Japanese Society for the Study of Teacher Education. 8-19.
  • Menter, I., Valeeva, R. and Kalimullin, A. (2017) A tale of two countries – forty years on: politics and teacher education in Russia and England. European Journal of Teacher Education. 40, 5, 616-629.
  • Whiting, C., Whitty, G., Menter, I., Black, P., Hordern, J., Parfitt, A., Reynolds, K. and Sorenson, N. (2018) Diversity and Complexity: Becoming a teacher in England in 2015-16. Review of Education 6, 1, 69-96.
  • Menter, I. (2018) Defining teachers’ professional knowledge: the interaction of global and national influences. Education and Self-Development.13, 1, 32-42.
  • Loughran, J. and Menter, I. (2019) The essence of being a teacher educator and why it matters, Asia-Pacific Journal of Teacher Education, DOI:10.1080/1359866X.2019.1575946
Research and professional activity

Ian’s research interests are in teacher education and teachers’ work, with a particular interest in policy. He has carried out a number of ‘home international’ comparative studies within the UK, including ESRC-sponsored initiatives and has led projects commissioned by the Scottish Government and The National College for School Leadership. He led a research support team from OUDE working on the National College for Teaching and Leadership project, Closing the Gap – Test and Learn. He was also Director of the Oxford City Council funded Leadership for Learning project, working in city primary schools.

Ian is a founding editor of Review of Education, a journal of the British Educational Research Association, launched in 2013. He is series editor for Critical Guides for Teacher Educators, published by Critical Publishing. He is a founder member of two UK-wide research groups, TEG (Teacher Education Group) and CAPeR-UK (Curricululum, Assessment and Pedagogy Reform across the UK), as well as the OUDE –led research group on Poverty and Teacher Education. He was also a member of the steering group for the BERA-RSA Inquiry into Research and Teacher Education.

Ken Mayhew is Emeritus Professor of Education and Economic Performance and Emeritus Fellow of Pembroke College, Oxford.

He is an Extraordinary Professor at Maastricht University, a Director of the Centre for Tutorial Teaching and has recently finished a term as a member of the Department for Education’s Skills and Productivity Board. He was the founding Director of SKOPE, a multi-disciplinary centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, based in the Oxford Department of Education.
Ken is also currently a member of the ESRC’s College of Peer Reviewers; the Expert Group for CEDEFOP’s European Training and Learning Survey; the Expert Working Group for Cedefop’s Second European Skills and Jobs Survey; Bright Blue’s Commission on the Welfare System after the COVID 19 Pandemic. He is an editor of Oxford Economic Papers

Ken obtained a First in Modern History at Worcester College, Oxford and took a Masters in Economics at LSE. After graduate school he joined Her Majesty’s Treasury before moving to Oxford. In 1989 and 1990 he was Economic Director at the UK National Economic Development Office, and has worked as a consultant for many private and public sector organisations at home and abroad. In the UK these include the Department of Education and Skills, the Department of Trade and Industry, DEFRA, the Skills Funding Agency, the CIPD and the Confederation of British Industry. Abroad they include the EU, the Polish, Belgian and Omani Governments, SIK (Sweden) and Group Training Australia. He was on the Academic Advisory Board of the National Skills Taskforce and Chair of an expert group advising the OECD on the background questionnaire for PIAAC. His major research interests are in labour economics, human resource management and the economics of education and training. He has published widely in these areas.

Ken Mayhew would welcome informal contacts from prospective students interested in the following topics:

• The economics of education
• Transitions from the education system to the labour market
• Work-based training and learning
• Education and social mobility
• The labour market

Research

Ken’s current research is mainly in six areas: transitions from education into the labour market; the economics of work-based training; the economics of higher education; low paid work in the UK and Europe; the labour market as a social model; inequality with special emphasis on regional inequality.

Featured publications
  •  Oxford Handbook of Skills and Training, Oxford University Press, 2017 (with J. Buchanan, D. Finegold and C. Warhurst)
  • “Educating for a cooperative society –building human and social capital: the role of government” in G. Redding, A. Drew and S. Crump (eds), The Oxford Handbook of Higher Education Systems and University Management, 2019
  • “Inequality”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 2019 (with S. Wills)
  • Holmes, C, Mayhew, K (2016) “The economics of higher education”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 32(4) 475-496.
  • Mayhew, K, Holmes, C (2015) Over-qualification and skills mismatch in the graduate labour market. London: CIPD.
  • Mayhew, K (2015) “UK labour market policy then and now”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy.
  • “BREXIT and higher education” (2022) Oxford Review of Economic Policy
  • “What accounts for changes in the chances of being NEET in the UK?” (2021) Journal of Education and Work (with C. Holmes and E. Murphy)
  • Higher education and the labour market” (2020) Oxford Review of Education (with H. Lauder)
Books
  • Oxford Handbook of Skills and Training, Oxford University Press, paperback edition 2018 (with J. Buchanan, D. Finegold and C. Warhurst)
  • Oxford Handbook of Skills and Training, Oxford University Press, 2017 (with J. Buchanan, D. Finegold and C. Warhurst)
  • Appelbaum, E, Bosch, G, Gautié, J, Mason, G, Mayhew, K, Salverda, W, Schmitt, J, Westergaard-Nielsen, N (2010) Introduction and overview.
  • LLoyd, C, Mason, G, Mayhew, K (2008) Low-Wage Work in the United Kingdom. Russell Sage Foundation.
  • Grip, AD, Loo, JV, Mayhew, K (2002) The Economics of Skills Obsolescence Theoretical Innovations and Empirical Applications. Jai.
  • Mayhew, K, Fenn, P, McGuire, A (1994) Providing Health Care. Oxford: OUP.
  • Mayhew, K, Layard, R, Owen, G (1994) Britain’s Training Deficit. Avebury Publishing.
  • Bowen, A, Mayhew, K (1991) Reducing Regional Inequalities.
  • Fenn, P, McGuire, A, Mayhew, K (1991) Providing Health Care. Oxford: OUP.
  • Bowen, A, Mayhew, K (1990) Improving Incentives for the Low-Paid. Springer.
  • Mayhew, K (1983) Trade Unions and the Labour Market. Blackwell Pub.
  • Robinson, DJS, Mayhew, K (1983) Pay policies for the future.
Book chapters
  • “NEETS in England”, in M. Levels, C. Brzinsky-Fay, C. Holmes and J. Jongbloed (eds), The Dynamics of Marginalised Youth, Routledge, 2022 (with C. Holmes, L. Wright, E. Murphy, E. Keep and S. Maguire)
  • “Derek Robinson” in R. Cord (ed), The Palgrave Companion to Oxford Economics, Palgrave, 2021
  • “What, if anything, can we learn from Germany, Switzerland, Austria, the Netherlands and Denmark?”, in D. Goodhart (ed.), The Training We Need Now, Policy Exchange, 2020
  • “Educating for a cooperative society –building human and social capital: the role of government” in G. Redding, A. Drew and S. Crump (eds), The Oxford Handbook of Higher Education Systems and University Management, 2019
  • “The economic and social benefits of skills” in Oxford Handbook of Skills and Training, 2017 (with I Grugulis and C. Holmes)
  • “Skills and training: the landscape” in Oxford Handbook of Skills and Training, 2017 (with J. Buchanan, D. Finegold and C. Warhurst)
  • Mayhew, K, Wickham-Jones, M (2014) “The UK’s Social Model from New Deal to Economic Crisis”, In: J-E Dolvik, A Martin (eds.) European Social Models from Crisis to Crisis: Employment and Inequality in an Era of Monetary Integration.Oxford: OUP.
  • Holmes, C, Mayhew, K (2014) “The winners and losers in the ‘hourglass’ labour market”, In: Understanding Employer Engagement in Education: Theories and Evidence. 92-113
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.4324/9781315779966
  • Mayhew, K (2010) “Comment on Anderson and Ruhs”, In: B Anderson, M Ruhs (eds.) Who Needs Migrant Workers: Labour Shortages, Immigration and Public Policy.
  • Gautié, J, Westergaard-Nielsen, N, Schmitt, J, Mayhew, K (2010) “The impact of institutions on the supply side of the low-wage labor market”, In: Low-Wage Work in the Wealthy World. 147-182
  • Bosch, G, Mayhew, K, Gautié, J (2010) “Industrial relations, legal regulations, and wage setting”, In: Low-Wage Work in the Wealthy World. 91-146
  • Mayhew, K, Keep, E (2009) “Knowledge, skills and competitiveness”, In: F Rauner, R Maclean (eds.) Handbook of TVET Research.
  • Mayhew, K, Mason, G, Osborne, M, Stevens, P (2008) “Low pay, labour market institutions and job quality”, In: C Lloyd, G Mason, K Mayhew (eds.) Low Wage Work in the UK. New York: Russell Sage.
  • Mayhew, K, Mason, G (2008) “Low paid work in the UK: an overview”, In: C Lloyd, G Mason, K Mayhew (eds.) Low Wage Work in the UK. New York: Russell Sage.
  • Mayhew, K, Deer, C (2007) “The changing nature and context of higher education in the UK”, In: T Butler, M Dane (eds.) Reflections on Change.
  • Mayhew, K (2005) How to improve the human capital of older workers. Paris: OECD.
  • Mayhew, K, de Grip, A, van Loo, J (2002) “The economics of skills obsolescence”, In: A de Grip, J van Loo, K Mayhew (eds.) The Economics of Skills Obsolescence: Theoretical Innovations and Empirical Applications. Jai.
  • Mayhew, K (2002) “The high skills vision”, In: A Jolly (ed.) Skills and Training Directory. Kogan Page.
  • Mayhew, K (2002) “Higher education – size matters”, In: G Hayward, S James (eds.) Growing Higher Education: Expansion or Hyperinflation.
  • Mayhew, K, Holtham, G, Ingram, P (1998) “The long term unemployed – what more can be done?”, In:J McCormick, C Oppenheim (eds.) Welfare in Working Order. London: IPPR.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1998) “Vocational Education and Training and Economic Performance”, In: T Buxton, P Chapman, J Temple (eds.) Britain’s Economic Performance. 2nd edition. London: Routledge. 367-395
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1998) “Training and Development”, In: S Fox (ed.) The European business environment UK. London: Thomson Business Press. 219-241
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1996) “UK Training Policy – Assumptions and Reality”, In: A Booth, DJ Snower (eds.) Acquiring Skills Market Failures, Their Symptoms and Policy Responses. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 303-334
  • Mayhew, K, Ingram, P, Guest, D (1996) “How do we think about pay?”, In: H Murlis (ed.) Pay at the Crossroads. London: IPD.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1996) “Training for the Unemployed”, In: P Meadows (ed.) Work out – or Work in? Contributions to the debate on the future of work. York: Joseph Rowntree Foundation. 140-155
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1995) “The Economic Demand for Higher Education, and Investing in People – Two Aspects of Sustainable Development in British Higher Education”, In: F Coffield (ed.) Higher Education in a Learning Society. Durham: Durham University School of Education. 81-110
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1995) Training Policy for Competitiveness – Time for a Fresh Perspective? London: Policy Studies Institute. 110-145
  • Mayhew, K, Layard, R, Owen, G (1994) “Why we need a Training Reform Act”, In: K Mayhew, R Layard, G Owen (eds.) Britain’s Training Deficit. Avebury.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1994) “The Changing Structure of Training Provision”, In: T Buxton, P Chapman, P Temple (eds.) Britain’s Economic Performance. London: Routledge.
  • Mayhew, K, Anderton, R (1994) “A comparative analysis of the UK labour market”, In: R Barrell (ed.) The UK Labour Market: Comparative Aspects and Institutional Developments. Cambridge University Press.
  • Mayhew, K (1994) “Pay policies in the private sector: an international overview”, In: M Lavender (ed.) International Pay Policies. London: Public Finance Foundation.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1993) “Training and the Labour Market”, In: C Trinder, P Jackson (eds.) The Public Services Yearbook 1993. London: Chapman and Hall. 169-190
  • Mayhew, K (1992) “Incomes policy”, In: New Palgrave Dictionary of Money and Finance. Palgrave.
  • Mayhew, K (1991) “Pay policies in the private sector: an international overview”, In: J Hawkins (ed.) International Pay Policies. London: Public Finance Foundation.
  • Mayhew, K, McGuire, A, Fenn, P (1991) “The economics of health care”, In: K Mayhew, A McGuire, P Fenn (eds.) Providing Health Care. Oxford: OUP.
  • Mayhew, K, Bowen, A (1991) “Regional economic disparities: some public policy issues”, In: K Mayhew, A Bowen (eds.) Reducing Regional Inequalities.
  • Mayhew, K (1991) “Training: the way ahead”, In: Employment Institute (ed.) Improving Britain’s Industrial Performance. Employment Institute.
  • Mayhew, K (1991) “Regional issues in economics: setting the scene”, In: K Mayhew, A Bowen (eds.) Reducing Regional Inequalities.
  • Keep, EJ (1990) “Training for the Low Paid”, In: A Bowen, K Mayhew (eds.) Improving Incentives for the Low-Paid. London: Macmillan/NEDO. 139-180
  • Mayhew, K, Ray, A (1990) “White collar pay and employment”, In: M Gregory, A Thompson (eds.) A Portrait of Pay. OUP.
  • Mayhew, K, Bowen, A (1990) “Incentives for the low paid: issues for public policy”, In: K Mayhew, A Bowen (eds.) Improving Incentives for the Low Paid.
  • Mayhew, K, Bowen, A, Brewer, D (1990) “Incentives for the low paid: setting the scene”, In: K Mayhew, A Bowen (eds.) Improving Incentives for the Low Paid.
  • Mayhew, K, Turnbull, P (1989) “Models of union behaviour”, In: R Perlman, R Drago (eds.) Microeconomic Issues in the Labour Market. Harvester.
  • Mayhew, K (1986) “Economists and immigration”, In: A Dummett (ed.) Towards a Just Immigration Policy.
  • Mayhew, K (1986) “Employee behaviour”, In: D Morris (ed.) The Economic System in the UK. OUP.
  • Mayhew, K, Addison, J (1983) “Discrimination in the labour market”, In: G Bain (ed.) Industrial relations in Britain. Blackwell.
  • Mayhew, K (1983) “Traditional incomes policies”, In: D Robinson, K Mayhew (eds.) Pay Policies for the Future.
  • Mayhew, K, Greenhalgh, C (1981) “Labour supply in Great Britain: theory and evidence”, In: Z Hornstein, J Grice (eds.) The Economics of the Labour Market. HMSO.
  • Mayhew, K (1981) “Incomes policy and the private sector”, In: R Elliott, L Fallick (eds.) Incomes Policy, Inflation and Relative Pay. George Allen and Unwin.
  • Mayhew, K (1981) “The institutional context of incomes policy”, In: R Chater, A Dean, R Elliott (eds.) Incomes Policies. OUP.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K “Education and Training”, In: C Trinder, P Jackson (eds.) Public Services Yearbook 1994. London: Chapman and Hall. 237-254
Conference papers
Journal articles
  • “BREXIT and UK higher education”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 2022
  • “Kurzarbeit/short time working: experiences and lessons from the COVID-induced downturn”, National Institute Economic Review, 2022 (with B. Casey)
  • “What accounts for changes in the chances of being NEET in the UK?”, Journal of Education and Work, 2021 (with C. Holmes and E. Murphy)
  • “Regional inequalities: causes and cures”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 2021 (with F. Corvers)
  • “COVID 19 and the labour market”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 2020 (with P. Anand)
  • “Higher education and the labour market”, Oxford Review of Education, 2020 (with H. Lauder)
  • Inequality”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 2019 (with S. Wills)
  • Mayhew, K (2017) “UK higher education and Brexit”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 33(1) S155-S161.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grx012
  • Mayhew, K (2016) “Human Capital, Growth and Inequality”, Welsh Economic Review. 24(0) 23-23.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.18573/j.2016.10052
  • Holmes, C, Mayhew, K (2016) “The economics of higher education”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 32(4) 475-496.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grw031
  • Mayhew, K (2015) “Derek Robinson (9 February 1932-1 September 2014)”, ECONOMIC AND LABOUR RELATIONS REVIEW.26(3) 490-492.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/1035304615597839
  • Laczik, A, Mayhew, K (2015) “Labour market developments and their significance for VET in England: Current concerns and debates”, Research in Comparative and International Education. 10(4) 558-575.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/1745499915615974
  • Mayhew, K (2015) “UK labour market policy then and now”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 31(2) 199-216.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grv017
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K (2014) “Inequality – ‘wicked problems’, labour market outcomes and the search for silver bullets”, OXFORD REVIEW OF EDUCATION. 40(6) 764-781.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/03054985.2014.979580
  • Mayhew, K (2013) “Government and business: an introduction”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 29(2) 249-260.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grt028
  • Cobham, D, Adam, C, Mayhew, K (2013) “The economic record of the 1997-2010 Labour government: an assessment”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 29(1) 1-24.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grt014
  • Amable, B, Mayhew, K (2011) “Unemployment in the OECD”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 27(2) 207-220.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grr019
  • Lloyd, C, Mayhew, K (2010) “Skill: the solution to low wage work?”, Industrial Relations Journal. 41(5) 429-445.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2338.2010.00578.x
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K (2010) “Moving beyond skills as a social and economic panacea”, WORK EMPLOYMENT AND SOCIETY. 24(3) 565-577.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0950017010371663
  • Salverda, W, Mayhew, K (2009) “Capitalist economies and wage inequality”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 25(1) 126-154.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grp008
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K, Payne, J (2006) “From skills revolution to productivity miracle – Not as easy as it sounds?”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 22(4) 539-559.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grj032
  • Mayhew, K, Neely, A (2006) “Improving productivity – Opening the black box”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 22(4) 445-456.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grj026
  • Mayhew, K, Deer, C, Dua, M (2004) “The move to mass higher education in the UK: many questions and some answers”, OXFORD REVIEW OF EDUCATION. 30(1) 65-82.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/0305498042000190069
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K (2004) “The economic and distributional implications of current policies on higher education”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 20(2) 298-314.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grh017
  • Gold, M, Charlwood, A, Müller-Camen, M, Lucas, R, Crowley, S, Heery, E, Benson, J, Mayhew, K, Bach, S, Moore, S, Finkin, M, Rowlinson, M, Beauregard, A (2002) “Book Reviews”, British Journal of Industrial Relations. 40 341-368.
  • Mayhew, K (2002) “The state of working Britain”, BRITISH JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS. 40(2) 355-357.
    Borghans, L, Green, F, Mayhew, K (2001) “Skills measurement and economic analysis: An introduction”, OXFORD ECONOMIC PAPERS-NEW SERIES. 53(3) 375-384.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oep/53.3.375
  • Mayhew, K (2000) “The assessment: Labour markets and welfare”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 16(1) 1-12.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/16.1.1
  • Felstead, A, Green, F, Pack, A, Mayhew, K (2000) “The Impact of Training on Labour”, British Journal of Industrial Relations. 38(2)
  • Green, F, Felstead, A, Mayhew, K, Pack, A (2000) “The impact of training on labour mobility: Individual and firm-level evidence from Britain”, BRITISH JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS. 38(2) 261-275.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/1467-8543.00162
  • Felstead, A, Green, F, Mayhew, K (1999) “Britain’s training statistics: A cautionary tale”, WORK EMPLOYMENT AND SOCIETY. 13(1) 107-115.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1017/S0950017099000070
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K (1999) “The assessment: Knowledge, skills, and competitiveness”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 15(1) 1-15.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/15.1.1
  • Mayhem, K (1997) “The Education and Training Mismatch”, Business Strategy Review. 8(2) 51-53.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/1467-8616.00022
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K (1996) “Towards a learning society — Definition and measurement”, Policy Studies. 17(3) 215-232.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/01442879608423708
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K (1996) “Economic Demand for Higher Education? A Sound Foundation for Further Expansion?”, Higher Education Quarterly. 50(2) 89-109.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2273.1996.tb01693.x
  • MAYHEW, K, SEABRIGHT, P (1992) “INCENTIVES AND THE MANAGEMENT OF ENTERPRISES IN ECONOMIC TRANSITION: CAPITAL MARKETS ARE NOT ENOUGH”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy. 8(1) 105-129.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/8.1.105
  • HELM, D, MAYER, C, MAYHEW, K (1991) “THE ASSESSMENT – MICROECONOMIC POLICY IN THE 1980S”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 7(3) 1-12.
  • MAYHEW, K (1991) “THE ECONOMICS OF HUMAN – RESOURCE MANAGEMENT – MITCHELL, DJB, ZAIDI, MA”, BRITISH JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS. 29(3) 534-535.
  • MAYHEW, K (1991) “THE ASSESSMENT – THE UK LABOR-MARKET IN THE 1980S”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 7(1) 1-17.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/7.1.1
  • McGUIRE, A, FENN, P, MAYHEW, K (1989) “THE ASSESSMENT: THE ECONOMICS OF HEALTH CARE”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy. 5(1) 1-20.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/5.1.1
  • KEEP, E, MAYHEW, E (1988) “THE ASSESSMENT: EDUCATION, TRAINING AND ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy. 4(3) 1-1.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/4.3.1-a
  • KNIGHT, JB, MAYHEW, K (1987) “WAGE DETERMINATION AND LABOR-MARKET INFLEXIBILITY – INTRODUCTION”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 49(1) 1-8.
  • MAYHEW, K (1986) “WAGE RESTRAINT BY CONSENSUS – BRITAIN SEARCH FOR AN INCOMES-POLICY AGREEMENT 1965-79 – FISHBEIN, WH”, JOURNAL OF ECONOMIC LITERATURE. 24(2) 694-695.
  • Mayhew, K (1985) “Reforming the labour market”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy. 1(2) 60-79.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/1.2.60
  • MAYHEW, K (1985) “ECONOMICS OF UNEMPLOYMENT – AN HISTORICAL-PERSPECTIVE – CASSON, M”, INDUSTRIAL & LABOR RELATIONS REVIEW. 38(4) 667-668.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.2307/2524010
  • ROBINSON, D, MAYHEW, K (1983) “SPECIAL ISSUE – PAY POLICIES FOR THE FUTURE – INTRODUCTION”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 45(1) 3-13.
  • MAYHEW, K (1983) “FAIRNESS, COLLECTIVE-BARGAINING, AND INCOMES-POLICY – WILLMAN, P”, MANCHESTER SCHOOL OF ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL STUDIES. 51(1) 105-106.
  • MAYHEW, K (1983) “TRADITIONAL INCOMES POLICIES”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 45(1) 15-32.
    ROBINSON, D, MAYHEW, K (1983) “SPECIAL ISSUE – PAY POLICIES FOR THE FUTURE – CONCLUSIONS”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 45(1) 127-139.
  • MAYHEW, K, ROSEWELL, B (1981) “OCCUPATIONAL-MOBILITY IN BRITAIN”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 43(3) 225-255.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1981.mp43003001.x
  • MAYHEW, K, ROSEWELL, B (1979) “LABOR-MARKET SEGMENTATION IN BRITAIN”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 41(2) 81-115.
  • MAYHEW, K (1979) “ECONOMISTS AND STRIKES”,OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 41(1) 1-19.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1979.mp41001001.x
  • MAYHEW, K, ROSEWELL, B (1978) “IMMIGRANTS AND OCCUPATIONAL CROWDING IN GREAT-BRITAIN”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 40(3) 223-248.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1978.mp40003003.x
  • MAYHEW, K (1977) “DEGREE OF UNIONIZATION 1948-68 – COMMENT”, BULLETIN OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH. 29(1) 51-53.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8586.1977.tb00409.x
  • MAYHEW, K (1977) “EARNINGS DISPERSION IN LOCAL LABOR-MARKETS – IMPLICATIONS FOR SEARCH BEHAVIOR”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 39(2) 93-107.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1977.mp39002001.x
  • MAYHEW, K (1976) “REGIONAL VARIATIONS OF MANUAL EARNINGS IN ENGINEERING”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 38(1) 11-25.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1976.mp38001002.x
  • MAYHEW, K (1976) “PLANT SIZE AND EARNINGS OF MANUAL WORKERS IN ENGINEERING”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 38(3) 149-160.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1976.mp38003001.x
  • MAYHEW, K (1975) “REVERSAL OF SKILL DIFFERENTIALS UNDER PAYMENT BY RESULTS SYSTEMS CASE OF ENGINEERING”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 37(4) 251-267.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1975.mp37004001.x
  • Mayhew, K “The resurgence of incomes policy”, Manpower Policy and Practice.
  • Mayhew, K, Rijkers, B “Improving the human capital of older workers”, Ageing Horizons.
  • Mayhew, K, Felstead, A, Green, F “Interpreting training statistics in Europe: issuing a health warning”, European Journal for Vocational Training.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K “Towards the knowledge-driven economy”, 7(4) 50-59.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K “Was Ratner Right? Product Market and Competitive Strategies and Their Links with Skills and Knowledge”, EPI Economic Report. 12(3) 1-14.
  • Mayhew, K “The Assessment: Labour Markets and Welfare”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Vol. 16.(1)
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/16.1.1
Reports
  • Alternative Pathways into the Labour Market, CIPD, 2016 (with Craig Holmes)
  • Wilde, S, James, SF, Mayhew, K (2015) Training Managers: Benefits from and barriers to WorldSkills UK participation. Oxford: Oxford University Consulting.
  • Mayhew, K, Holmes, C (2015) Over-qualification and skills mismatch in the graduate labour market. London: CIPD.
  • James Relly, SF, Holmes, C, Mayhew, K (2015) Learning environments to develop vocational excellence. http://vocationalexcellence.education.ox.ac.uk/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/Project-2-Phase-2-Final-Report-Learning-environments-to-develop-vocational-excellence.pdf:
  • Chankseliani, M, James Relly, S, Mayhew, K (2015) WorldSkills competitors and entrepreneurship: A Report to the Skills Funding Agency.
  • Chankseliani, M, James Relly, Susan, Mayhew, Ken (2015) “Benefits of Developing Vocational Excellence. A Report to the National Apprenticeship Service of Project 3 (Phase II) of the DUVE suite of projects”, In: Benefits of Developing Vocational Excellence. A Report to the National Apprenticeship Service of Project 3 (Phase II) of the DUVE suite of projects.
  • James Relly, SF, Allen, J, Mayhew, K (2015) Further education college participation in worldSkills and other competitions. http://vocationalexcellence.education.ox.ac.uk/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/Project-4-Further-education-college-participation-in-WorldSkills-and-other-skills-competitions.pdf:
  • James Relly, SF, Rodriguez Leal, T, Mayhew, K (2014) Interim Evaluation Report on the Skills Competition CPD Programme. Oxford: Oxford University Consulting.
  • James Relly, SF, Rodriguez Leal, T, Mayhew, K (2014) Final Evaluation Report on the Skills Competition CPD Programme. Oxford: Oxford University Consulting.
  • James, SF, Mayhew, K, Laczik, A, Mordarska, M (2013) Report on Apprenticeships, Employer Engagement and Vocational Formation in England. Oxford: Oxford University Consulting.
  • James, SF, Mayhew, K, Chankseliani, M, Laczik, A (2013) “Benefits of Developing Vocational Excellence. A Report to the National Apprenticeship Service. Oxford: SKOPE”, In: Benefits of Developing Vocational Excellence A Report to the National Apprenticeship Service of Project 3 of the DUVE suite of projects.
  • James, S, Holmes, C, Mayhew, K (2013) “Learning Environments to Develop vocational Excellence. Oxford: SKOPE”, In: A Report to the National Apprenticeship Service of Project 2 of the DUVE suite of projects. Oxford: SKOPE.
  • Mayhew, K, Holmes, C (2012) Is the UK labour market polarising. London: Resolution Foundation.
  • Holmes, C, Mayhew, K, Keep, EJ (2012) “Ten Big Questions for Higher Education”, In: SKOPE Issues Paper. Cardiff: Cardiff University, SKOPE.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (2011) “Future Directions for Skills Policy”, In: SKOPE submission to the Labour Party Policy Review on skills (mimeo). Universities of Oxford and Cardiff, SKOPE.
  • Mayhew, K, Green, F, Stasz, C (2005) Defining a strategy for the direct assessment of adult skills. Copenhagen:Danish Technological Institute.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (2004) Can Employers Be Persuaded That Training Pays? Glasgow: Future Skills Scotland/ScottishEnterprise.
  • Mayhew, K, Wilson, R, Hogarth, T, Keep, E (2003) Tackling the low skills equilibrium. London: Department of Trade and Industry.
  • Mayhew, K, Green, F, Molloy, E (2003) Employer Perspectives on Skill. London: Department for Education and Skills.
  • Mayhew, K, Keep, E, Bosworth, D (2003) Tackling the low skills equilibrium: a review of the issues. Department of Trade and Industry.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K, Corney, M (2002) Review of the evidence on the rate of return to employers of investment in training and employer training measures. Department of Trade and Industry.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (2001) “Globalisation, Models of Competitive Advantage and Skills”, In: SKOPE Research Paper. Coventry: University of Warwick, SKOPE.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (2000) “The Leisure Sector”, In: National Skills Task Force Research Project Report. Sheffield: DfEE.
  • Mayhew, K, Felstead, A, Green, F (1997) Getting the measure of training. Leeds: Centre for Industrial Policy and Performance, Leeds University.
  • Mayhew, K, Holtham, G (1996) Tackling long term unemployment. London: Institute for Public Policy Research.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1994) “UK Training Policy – Assumptions and Reality”, In: Background briefing paper for TUC national conference ‘Looking Forward to Full Employment’. London: TUC.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1994) Scoping paper for the Institute of Personnel Management ‘What Makes Training Pay?’ Project. London: IPM.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1993) Submission on training and skills utilisation to the House of Commons Select Committee on Trade and Industry’s inquiry into the competitiveness of British manufacturing’, June, 1993. (subsequently published in Evidence to the House of Commons Select Committee on Trade and Industry, Trade and Industry Committee 2nd Report ‘Competitiveness of UK Manufacturing Industry’, Vol 2, Memoranda of Evidence. London: HMSO.
  • Layard, R, Mayhew, K, Owen, G (1993) The Training Reform Act of 1994.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1108/01437729310033296
  • Mayhew, K, St John, B (1989) Subcontracting in Britain. London: Confederation of British Industry.
  • Mayhew, K, Rosewell, B (1981) Manpower problems and changes in the labour market. Bradford: MCB Publications.
  • Mayhew, K, Rosewell, B (1980) Employment and Unemployment Issues in the 1970s.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1108/eb001235
  • Mayhew, K, Lall, S (1973) The income and balance of payments effects of private foreign investment in manufacturing: case studies of Colombia and Malaysia. UNCTAD.
Other
  • “BREXIT and UK higher education”, Realites Industrielles, Feb 2021
  • Skills and Skills Mismatch in Food and Drink Manufacturing, a Report for DEFRA, 2020 (with Craig Holmes)
  • “Career choice and a policy dilemma”, CEDEFOP’S Skill Set and Match, November 2018
  • Oman: National Workforce Planning, SKOPE, 2016
  • Mayhew, K (2015) “Derek Robinson”, Royal Economic Society Newsletter.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1999) “Demand and supply”, People Management. 40-42.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1998) “Was Ratner Right”, T-Magazine. 15-17.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1998) “Welfare to Work – some questions ministers must answer”, Parliamentary Brief. 5(3) 18-19.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1996) “What Training Can and Cannot Do for the Jobless”, Parliamentary Brief. 4(4) 43-46.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1994) “Skilling the Jobless: Time for a New Deal”, Employment Policy Institute Economic Report. 8(1) 1-5.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1994) “Skills Cannot Promise a Job”, Parliamentary Brief .3(2) 17-20.

Herb completed a BA (Hons) Psychology at Indiana University in 1968. After that, he achieved an MA at Indiana before moving to UCLA to complete a DPhil in Psychology in 1974.

Shortly after, he was appointed Head of Evaluation Research Services at University of Southern California for 5 years, before moving to Sydney, Australia in 1980 to take a position as Lecturer, and then Senior Lecturer, at Sydney University.

At the same time, he was a Reader in Education. He held these posts until 1990, when he joined the University of Western Sydney. Over the next 15 years at that institution, he served a number of roles, including Research Professor of Education, Professor of Psychology, Dean of Graduate Research Studies, Pro-Vice Chancellor of Research, and Director of Self-concept Enhancement and Learning Facilitation (SELF) Research Centre. Indeed, in 1997 he founded the SELF Research Centre, which now has over 450 members, including many of the top self-concept researchers in the world, and satellite centres at leading Universities in Australia, Europe, North America, and Asia (see http://self.uws.edu.au/). He served as Director of SELF until he departed at the start of 2006 to become a Professor at the University of Oxford.

Herb has supervised scores of Honours-level and Doctoral candidates. Some of his recent PhD supervisions have been in the areas of self-concept theory and intervention, motivation, scale development, bullying, mental toughness in elite athletes, the peer review process, and eating disorders, among others. They generally employ complex quantitative research techniques

Research

Herb Marsh is widely published with 350 articles in more than 70 different journals, 60 chapters, 14 monographs, and 350 conference papers; and co-edits the International Advances in Self Research monograph series. In the most important journals in his disciplines over the last quarter century he is the most frequently published author in American Educational Research Journal (29 articles) and the Journal of Sport & Exercise Psych (21 articles), and second most frequently published author in Journal of Educational Psychology (61 articles). He has a total of 276 journal articles listed in ISI that have been cited a total of more than 11,00 times – including 55 articles with at least 55 citations (ISI H index = 55) and one article with more than 1,100 citations.

He has been recognized as the most productive educational psychologist in the world, as one of the top 10 international researchers in Higher Education and in Social Psychology, and the 11th most productive researcher in the world across all disciplines of psychology. He is a highly cited researcher on ISI’s list of the “world’s most cited and influential scientific authors over a sustained period according to a common standard that covers all countries and all scientific disciplines” (http://isihighlycited.com/), one of only a few UK social science researchers to achieve this recognition and one of the few anywhere to achieve this distinction in two different categories (general social sciences and psychology/psychiatry; presently there is no classification for education).

He has reviewed articles for more than 75 journals and has been on the editorial boards of 14 international journals (J. Ed Psych; Am Ed Res J; Child Devel; Perspectives on Psych Sci; J Pers & Soc Psych; Structural Equation Modelling; Inter J of Sport Psych; Ed & Psych Measurement; J Exp Educ; Educ Res and Eval; J Sport & Exercise Psych; Int J of Sport & Exercise Psych; J of Contemporary Ed Psych; Organizational Res Methods; Multivariate Behavioral Res).

He has served on external advisory committees for the: Scientific Advisory Board of the German Max Planck Institute (Education and Human Development, Berlin); Hong Kong Institute of Educational Research, Chinese University of Hong Kong; Social Sciences and Humanities for the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zürich (Zürich ETH); and the International Research School “The Life Course: Evolutionary and Ontogenetic Dynamics” co-organised by the Univ of Michigan (USA), Univ of Virginia (USA), Humboldt University (Germany), Free University (Germany) and the Max Planck Institute.

Professor Marsh’s research has consistently attracted external funding, including a 100% success record on 24 proposals to the highly competitive Australian Research Council during the last 25 years as well as more recent United Kingdom grants from the Economic and Social Research Council, Higher Education Funding Council for England, and Higher Education Authority.

Other international awards include a Career Achievement Award from the American Educational Research Association, the prestigious Wen Lin Visiting Professorship from The Chinese University of Hong Kong, a visiting travelling fellowship from the British Psychological Society, Fellow of the Australian Academy of Social Sciences and the Society of Multivariate Experimental Psychology, and many keynote presentations at international conferences including the presidential invited keynote addresses for 2007 meetings of both the British Educational Research Association and the American Educational Research Association. In 2008 Professor Marsh was awarded the ESRC Professorial Fellowship which provides professorial salary, support staff and infrastructure for an extended research programme, a highly competitive fellowship awarded to only 3-5 social science researchers across all of the UK.

Major research/scholarly interests

Self-concept and Motivational constructs: Theory, Measurement, Research, Enhancement; Teaching Effectiveness and Its Evaluation: Theory, measurement, research, and enhancement; Higher Education with a particular emphasis on students’ evaluation of teaching and relations between teaching and research; Developmental Psychology; Quantitative analysis, particularly confirmatory factor analysis, structural equation modelling, multilevel modelling; Sports psychology with a particular focus on physical self-concept and motivation; health psychology with a focus on motivational aspects of health related physical activity, physical fitness, and eating disorders; The peer review process in relation to both journals and research grants; Peer support and anti-bullying interventions.

Recent publications (2008 and in press)
Journal articles
  • Cowin, L.S. Johnson, M., Craven, R.G., & Marsh, H.W. (2008) Causal modeling of self-concept, job satisfaction, and retention of nurses International Journal Of Nursing Studies 45, 1449-1459
  • Craven, R. & Marsh, H. W. (2008). The centrality of the self-concept construct for psychological wellbeing and unlocking human potential: Implications for child and educational psychologists Educational & Child Psychology 25, 104-118.
  • Guay, F., Marsh, H. W., Senécal, C. , Dowson, M. (2008). Representations of relatedness with parents and friends and autonomous academic motivation during the late adolescence-early adulthood period: Reciprocal or unidirectional effects? British Journal of Educational Psychology, 78, 621–637
  • Ginns, P., Marsh, H. W., Behnia, M., Cheng, J. H. & Scalas, F. (in press). Using postgraduate students’ evaluations of research experience to benchmark departments and faculties: Issues and challenges British Journal of Educational Psychology
  • Fernet, C., Senécal, C., Guay, F., Marsh, H., & Dowson, M. (2008). The Work Tasks Motivation Scale for Teachers (WTMST) Journal of Career Assessment 16(2), 256-279.
  • Lüdtke, O., Marsh, H. W., Robitzsch, A., Trautwein, U., Asparouhov, T., & Muthén, B. (2008). The multilevel latent covariate model: A new, more reliable approach to group-level effects in contextual studies Psychological Methods 13, 203-229.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2008). The elusive importance effect: More failure for the Jamesian perspective on the importance of importance in shaping self-esteem Journal of Personality 76, 1081-1121.
  • Marsh, H. W., Jayasinghe, U. W., & Bond, N. W. (2008). Improving the peer-review process for grant applications: Reliability, validity and generalization American Psychologist 63, 160-168.
  • Marsh; H., Ludtke, O., Robitzsch, A., Trautwein, U. Latent (in press). Profile Analysis of Academic Self-concept Dimensions: Synergy of Person- and Variable-centered Approaches to the Internal/External Frame of Reference Models Structural Equation Modeling
  • Marsh, H. W., Martin, A. J., & Cheng, J. H. S. (2008). A multilevel perspective on gender in classroom motivation and climate: Potential benefits of male teachers for boys? Journal of Educational Psychology 100, 78-95.
  • Marsh, H. W., & O’Mara, A. (2008). Reciprocal effects between academic self-concept, self-esteem, achievement and attainment over seven adolescent years: Unidimensional and multidimensional perspectives of self-concept  Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin 34, 542-552.
  • Marsh, H. W., O’Mara, A. J. & Malmberg, L. (2008). Meta-Analysis: A three-level multilevel meta-anlaysis.
  • Marsh, H. W., Seaton, M., Trautwein, U., Lüdtke, O., Hau, K. T., O’Mara, A. J., & Craven, R. G. (2008). The big-fish-little-pond-effect stands up to critical scrutiny: Implications for theory, methodology, and future research Educational Psychology Review 20, 319-350.
  • Marsh, H. W., Trautwein, U., Ludtke, O. & Köller, O. (2008). Social comparison and big-fish-little-pond effects on self-concept and other self-belief constructs: Role of generalized and specific others Journal of Educational Psychology 100, 510-524.
  • Martin, A. J., & Marsh, H. W. (2008). Academic buoyancy: Towards an understanding of students’ everyday academic resilience Journal of School Psychology 46, 53-83.
  • Martin, A.J., & Marsh, H.W. (in press). Academic resilience and academic buoyancy: an encompassing multidimensional and hierarchical framing of concepts, causes, correlates, and cognate constructs Oxford Review of Education.
  • Martin, A.J., & Marsh, H.W. (2008). Workplace and academic buoyancy: Psychometric assessment and construct validity amongst school personnel and students Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment 26, 168-184.
  • Martin, A.J., Marsh, H.W., Debus, R. L. & Malmberg L. E. (2008). Performance and mastery orientation of high school and university/college students – A Rasch perspective Educational And Psychological Measurement 68, 464-487.
  • Scalas, L. F. & Marsh, H. W. (in press). The Role of Actual-Ideal Discrepancy in Explaining the Relation Between Physical Appearance and Self-Concept: A Stronger Methodological Approach European Journal of Personality.
  • Seaton, M., Marsh; H., & Craven, R. G. (in press). Earning Its Place as a Pan-Human Theory: Universality of the Big-Fish-Little-Pond Effect (BFLPE) Across 41 Culturally and Economically Diverse Countries Journal of Educational Psycholoygy.
  • Seaton, M., Marsh; H. W., Dumas; F., Huguet, P., Monteil, J. M, Regner, I., Blanton, H., Buunk, A. P., Gibbons, F. X. Kuyper, H., Suls, J. & Wheeler, L. (2008). In search of the big fish: Investigating the coexistance of the big-fish-little-pond effect with the positive effects of upward comparison British Journal of Social Psychology 47, 73-103.
  • Wen, Z., Marsh, H.W.,  Kit-Tai, H. & (in press). Structural Equation Models of Latent Interactions: An Appropriate Standardized Solution and Its Scale-free Properties Structural Equation Modeling
Edited books and chapters
  • Marsh, H. W., Craven, R. G., & McInerney, D. (Eds.). (2008). Self-Processes, Learning, and Enabling Human Potential: Dynamic New Approaches. International Advances in Self Research. Volume 3. Information Age Press: Greenwich, CT.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2007). Application of confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling in sport and exercise psychology. In G. Tenenbaum & R. C. Eklund. (Eds), Handbook of sport psychology (3rd Ed.). (pp. 774-798). Hoboken, NJ, US: John Wiley & Sons Inc.
  • Marsh, H. W. (In press). A multidimensional, hierarchical model of self-concept: An important facet of personality. In G. J. Boyle (ed.). Handbook of Personality. Sage: London.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2007). Physical Self-Concept and Sport. In S. Jowette & D. Lavallee, David (Eds), Social Psychology in Sport. (pp. 159-179). Champaign, IL, US: Human Kinetics.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2007). Students’ evaluations of university teaching: A multidimensional perspective. In R. P. Perry & J C. Smart (Eds.), The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: An Evidence-Based Perspective (pp.319-384).  New York: Springer.
  • Marsh, H.W., Cheng, J.,  Middleton, C. J. (in press). The Physical Self: Exploring Measurement and Constructs Surrounding Physical Self-Concept
  • Marsh, H.W., Martin, A. J. & Cheng, J. (2008). How we judge ourselves from different perspectives: Contextual influences on self-concept formation. In M. L. Maehr, S. Karabenick & T. Urdan (Eds.). Advances in Motivation and Achievement (Volume 15). New York: Elsevier.
  • Marsh, H.W., & O’Mara, A. J. (2008). Self-concept is as multidisciplinary as it is multidimensional: A review of theory, measurement, and practice in self-concept research. In H. W. Marsh, R. G. Craven, & D. M. McInerney (Eds.). Self-Processes, Learning, and Enabling Human Potential: Dynamic New Approaches. (Volume 3, pp. 87-118). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing
  • Marsh, H.W., & Retali, K. (in press). Academic self-concept. K. Littleton, C. Wood, J. K. Staarman (Eds.). Elsevier Handbook of Educational Psychology: New Perspectives on Learning and Teaching. New York: Elsevier
  • Marsh, H.W., Scalas L.F. (in press). Self-concept and learning: Reciprocal effects model between academic self-concept and academic achievement. To appear in B. McGaw, E. Baker, P. P. Peterson (Eds.) International Encyclopedia of Education, 3rd edition. Elsevier.
  • McInerney, D. M., Marsh, H.W., & Craven, R. G., & (2008). Self-Processes, Learning, and Enabling Human Potential. In H. W. Marsh, R. G. Craven, & D. M. McInerney (Eds.). Self-Processes, Learning, and Enabling Human Potential: Dynamic New Approaches. (Volume 3, pp. 3-12). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.
  • Parada, R., Craven, R. G., & Marsh, H.W. (2008). The beyond bullying secondary program: An innovative program empowering teachers to counteract bullying in schools. Self-Processes, Learning, and Enabling Human Potential: Dynamic New Approaches. (Volume 3, pp. 373-426). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.
  • Seaton, M., Craven, R. G., &  Marsh, H.W. (2008). East Meets West: Investigating the Generalizability of the Big-Fish-Little-Pond Effect in Western and Non-Western Countries. In H. W. Marsh, R. G. Craven, & D. M. McInerney (Eds.). Self-Processes, Learning, and Enabling Human Potential: Dynamic New Approaches. (Volume 3, pp. 353-372). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.
Most important publications (prior to 2008)
  • Marsh, H. W. (2007). Students’ evaluations of university teaching: A multidimensional perspective. In R. P. Perry & J C. Smart (Ed.), The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: An Evidence-Based Perspective (pp.319-384).  New York: Springer.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2007).Self-concept theory, measurement and research into practice: The role of self-concept in educational psychology. Leicester, UK: British Psychological Society.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2007). Application of confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling in sport/exercise psychology. In G. Tenenbaum & R. C. Eklund (Eds.), Handbook of on sport psychology (3rd ed., pp. 774 – 798). New York: Wiley.
  • Marsh, H. W., & Hau, K-T. (2007). Applications of latent-variable models in educational psychology: The need for methodological-substantive synergies. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 32, 151-171.
  • Marsh, H. W., Hau, K-T., Artelt, C., Baumert, J., Peschar, J. L. (2006). OECD’s brief self-report measure of educational psychology’s most useful affective constructs: Cross-cultural, psychometric comparisons across 25 countries. International Journal of Testing. 6, 311–360.  (special issue of journal).
  • Marsh, H. W. & Craven, R. G. (2006). Reciprocal effects of self-concept and performance from a multidimensional perspective: Beyond seductive pleasure and unidimensional perspectives. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 1, 133-163.
  • Marsh, H. W., Martin, A. J., & Hau, K-T. (2006). A Multiple Method Perspective on Self-concept Research in Educational Psychology: A Construct Validity Approach. In M. Eid & E. Diener (Eds.), Handbook of Multimethod Measurement in Psychology (pp. 441-456). American Psychological Association: Washington DC.
  • Marsh, H.W., Papaioannou, A., Theodorakis, Y. (2006). Causal ordering of physical self-concept and exercise behavior: Reciprocal effects model and the influence of physical education teachers. Health Psychology, 25 (3): 316-328
  • Marsh, H. W., Trautwein, U., Lüdtke, O., Köller, O. & Baumert, J. (2006) Integration of multidimensional self-concept and core personality constructs: Construct validation and relations to well-being and achievement. Journal of Personality, 74, 403-455.
  • Marsh, H. W., Ellis, L., Parada, L., Richards, G. & Heubeck, B. G. (2005). A short version of the Self Description Questionnaire II: Operationalizing criteria for short-form evaluation with new applications of confirmatory factor analyses. Psychological Assessment, 17, 81-102.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2005). Big fish little pond effect on academic self-concept. German Journal of Educational Psychology, 19, 119-128.
  • Marsh, H. W. & Kleitman, S. (2005). Consequences of employment during high school: Character building, subversion of academic goals, or a threshold. American Educational Research Journal, 42, 331-369.
  • Marsh, H. W., Debus, R. & Bornholt, L. (2005). Validating Young Children’s Self-concept Responses: Methodological Ways and means to understand their responses. In D. M. Teti (Ed.), Handbook of Research Methods in Developmental Science (pp. 138-160). Blackwell Publishers: Oxford, UK.
  • Marsh, H. W., Hau, K-T & Grayson, D. (2005). Goodness of Fit Evaluation in Structural Equation Modeling. In A. Maydeu-Olivares & J. McArdle (Eds.), Contemporary Psychometrics. A Festschrift for Roderick P. McDonald (pp. 275-340). Mahwah NJ: Erlbaum.
  • Marsh, H. W., & Perry, C. (2005). Does a positive self-concept contribute to winning gold medals in elite swimming? The causal ordering of elite athlete self-concept and championship performances. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 27, 71-91.
  • Marsh, H. W., Trautwein, U., Lüdtke, O., Köller, O. & Baumert, J. (2005) Academic self-concept, interest, grades and standardized test scores: Reciprocal effects models of causal ordering. Child Development, 76, 297-416.
  • Marsh, H. W. & Hau, K. T. (2004). Explaining paradoxical relations between academic self-concepts and achievements: Cross-cultural generalizability of the internal-external frame of reference predictions across 26 countries. Journal of Educational Psychology, 96,  56-67
  • Marsh, H.W., Hau, K.T. & Wen, Z., (2004).  In search of golden rules: Comment on hypothesis testing approaches to setting cutoff values for fit indexes and dangers in overgeneralising Hu & Bentler’s (1999) findings. Structural Equation Modelling, 11, 320-341.
  • Marsh, H. W.; Wen, Z.; Hau, K. (2004). Structural equation models of latent interactions: Evaluation of alternative estimation strategies and indicator construction. Psychological Methods, 9, 275-300.
  • Marsh, H. W. & Hau, K. T. (2003). Big fish little pond effect on academic self-concept: A crosscultural (26 country) test of the negative effects of academically selective schools. American Psychologist, 58, 364-376.
  • Guay, F., Marsh, H. W. & Boivin, M. (2003). Academic self-concept and academic achievement: Development perspectives on their causal ordering. Journal of Educational Psychology, 95, 124-136.
  • Marsh, H. W., Hau, K-T, & Kong, C-K, (2002). Multilevel Modeling of Longitudinal Growth and Change: Substantive Effects or Regression Toward the Mean Artifacts? Multivariate Behavioral Research, 37, 245-282.
  • Jayasinghe, U. W., Marsh, H. W. & Bond, N. (2002). A Multilevel Cross-classified Modelling Approach to Peer Review of Grant Proposals: The Effects of Assessor and Researcher Attributes on Assessor Ratings. Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A-Statistics in Society, 166, 279-300.
  • Marsh, H. W., Ellis, L., & Craven, R. G. (2002). How do preschool children feel about themselves? Unravelling measurement and multidimensional self-concept structure. Developmental Psychology, 38, 376-393.
  • Marsh, H. W. & Hattie, J. (2002). The relationship between research productivity and teaching effectiveness: Complimentary, antagonistic or independent constructs. Journal of Higher Education, 73, 603-642.
  • Marsh, H. W. & Kleitman, S. (2002). Extracurricular school activities: The good, the bad, and the nonlinear. Harvard Educational Review, 72, 464-502.
  • Marsh, H. W., Rowe, K., Martin, A. (2002). PhD students’ evaluations of research supervision: Issues, complexities and challenges in a nationwide Australian experiment in benchmarking universities. Journal of Higher Education, 73 (3), 313-348.
  • Marsh, H. W., Koeller, O., & Baumert, J. (2001). Reunification of East and West German school systems: Longitudinal multilevel modeling study of the big fish little pond effect on academic self-concept. American Educational Research Journal, 38 (2), 321-350.
  • Marsh, H. W., Parada, R. H., Yeung, A. S. & Healey, J. (2001). Aggressive School Troublemakers and Victims:A Longitudinal Model Examining the Pivotal Role of Self-concept. Journal of Educational Psychology, 93(2), 411-419.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2001). Distinguishing between good (useful) and bad workload on students’ evaluations of teaching. American Educational Research Journal, 38 (1), 183-212.
  • Marsh, H. W., Hau, K-T, & Kong, C-K, (2000). Late Immersion and Language of Instruction (English vs. Chinese) in Hong Kong High Schools: Achievement Growth in Language and Nonlanguage Subjects. Harvard Educational Review 70, 302-346.
  • Marsh, H. W., Kong, C-K, Hau, K-T (2000).  Longitudinal Multilevel Modeling of the Big Fish Little Pond Effect on Academic Self-concept:  Counterbalancing Social Comparison and Reflected Glory Effects in Hong Kong High Schools. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 78,  337-349.
  • Marsh, H. W., & Roche, L. A. (2000). Effects of grading leniency and low workloads on students’ evaluations of teaching: Popular myth, bias, validity or innocent bystanders? Journal of Educational Psychology, 92,:202-228.
  • Marsh, H. W., Craven, R. G., & Debus, R. (1998). Structure, stability, and development of young children’s self-concepts: A multicohort-multioccasion study. Child Development, 69(4), 1030-1053.
  • Marsh, H. W., Hau, K-T., Balla, J R., & Grayson, D. (1998) Is more ever too much? The number of indicators per factor in confirmatory factor analysis. Multivariate Behavioral Research, 33, 181-220.
  • Marsh, H. W., & Roche, L. A (1997). Making students’ evaluations of teaching effectiveness effective. American Psychologist, 52, 1187-1197.
  • Marsh, H. W. (1997). The measurement of physical self-concept: A construct validation approach. In K. Fox (Ed.), The physical self-: From motivation to well-being (pp. 27-58). Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.
  • Marsh, H. W.,  & Craven, R. (1997). Academic self-concept: Beyond the dustbowl. In G. Phye (Ed.), Handbook of classroom assessment: Learning, achievement, and adjustment (pp. 131-198). Orlando, FL : Academic Press.

Ingrid Lunt is a psychologist by background, and joined the Oxford Department of Education in 2005, having previously worked for 20 years at the Institute of Education, University of London.

She was Director of Graduate Studies for 5 years, and the first Director of the new ESRC Doctoral Training Centre (DTC) in the Social Sciences.

She has been President of the British Psychological Society (1998-1999), President of the European Federation of Psychologists Associations (1993-1999), and Vice President of the International Union of Psychological Science (2004-2008).

She has carried out research in the field of special educational needs and inclusive education, and more recently in the area of higher education, in particular higher professional education, and doctoral education. For the past 20 years she has been leading a project, initially funded by the European Union, which has been developing a common qualifications framework for psychologists across Europe.

Research

Ingrid’s research interests include higher professional learning, doctoral education, comparative higher education policy in European countries.

Publications

Selected publications include:

  • Scott D., Brown A., Lunt I., Thorne L. (2004) Professional Doctorates: Integrating professional and academic knowledge. Open University Press and SRHE
  • Klenowski V. and Lunt I. (2008) Enhancing Learning at Doctoral Level through the use of reflection? Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education 33, 2, 203-217.
  • Lunt I. (2008) Psychologist qualifications in Europe: Common standards for quality and mobility. Australian Psychologist 43, 4, 222-230
  • Lunt I. (2008) Beyond tuition fees? The legacy of Blair’s government to higher education. Oxford Review of Education 34, 6, 741-752
  • Edwards A., Lunt I., Stamou E. (2010) Inter-professional work and expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools. British Educational Research Journal 36, 1, 27-45
  • Lunt I. (2011) EuroPsy: the development of standards and competence of psychologists. European Psychologist 16, 2, 104-111
  • Lunt I. and Peiro J. M. (2012) The Bologna Process, education and assessment in psychology. In Ed. D. Dunn, S.C Baker, C.M Mehrota, R.E. Landrum, M.M McCarthy Assessing teaching and learning in psychology: current and future perspectives. Wadsworth Publishing, Belmont CA.
  • Lunt I., McAlpine L., Mills D. (2014) Lively bureaucracy: the ESRC’s Doctoral Training Centres and UK universities. Oxford Review of Education 40, 2, 151-170
  • Lunt I. (2014) International frameworks for psychology education and training: a European perspective. In R. Silbereisen, P. Ritchie, J. Panday (eds.) Psychology Education and Training : a global perspective. Hove: Psychology Press
  • Clarke, G. and Lunt, I. (2014) The concept of ‘originality’ in the PhD: how is it interpreted by examiners? Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, 39 (7), 803-820.
  • Lunt I., Peiró J.M., Poortinga Y.H., Roe R.A. (2015) EuroPsy: Standards and Quality in Education for Professional Psychologists. Göttingen: Hogrefe Pub.

Anne joined the Department in 2005 having held Chairs at the Universities of Leeds and Birmingham. She was Director of the Department for three years (January 2010 to December 2012) and when not in that post, she was its Director of Research. She became Professor Emerita in October 2014.

Anne is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, and of the Learned Society of Wales and is a former President of the British Educational Research Association. She is a Fellow of St Hilda’s College and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Oslo from 2007 to 2016 and has been awarded Doctorates honoris causa by the Universities of Helsinki and Oslo and in 2022 she received a lifetime’s achievement award from the American Educational Research Association’s Cultural-Historical SIG.

She was a member of the ESRC’s Research Grants Board between 2003 and 2007 and a member of the Education sub-panel in the 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise. She is co-founder of OSAT (the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research), is a founding editor of Learning Culture and Social Interaction. She is a member of the UK Cabinet Office’s Research Evidence Impact Panel (REIP), sits on several research advisory boards internationally, undertakes research evaluations for research councils worldwide and continues to be involved in institutional reviews.

Research

Anne’s research draws on cultural-historical approaches to learning. She focuses on professional learning and, in particular, the relational turn in expertise with the concepts of relational expertise, common knowledge and relational agency. These ideas are discussed in her 2010 book with Springer. In her later edited book Working relationally in and across practices (Cambridge University Press, 2017) researchers, who work with her ideas, have tested and refined these concepts in a range of different settings. Her research on practice, relational expertise and inter-professional work with vulnerable children and families also informs her interest in user engagement with research and its implications for the design of educational research. User engagement was discussed in her 2011 book with Mark Rickinson and Judy Sebba, in an exploration of knowledge exchange in the social sciences based in Oxford, and in study of school-university research relationships through the work of school-based research champions.

Her current research, informed by cultural-historical theory, is based at the University of Oslo. The research team has recently completed a Norwegian Research Council study of how elementary school teachers work successfully with shy and withdrawn children. The team has been awarded a further four years’ funding to examine shy children’s experiences of transitions between lessons in high school. She is currently co-authoring a book with Mariane Hedegaard for Cambridge University Press, where the two authors revisit their own research studies to make a case for a relational pedagogy, based in Vygotskian approaches to emotion, development and learning. She is also co-editing, with Helen Bound and Karen Evans and Arthur Chia, a collection for Taylor and Francis on current approaches to workplace learning. Her contribution, with Dorothy Sutherland Olsen, draws on a study of the transitions that arise through the introduction of new technologies into existing workplaces.

Publications since 2009

Books

  • Edwards, A., Daniels, H., Gallagher, T., Leadbetter, J. & Warmington, P. (2009) Improving Inter-professional Collaborations: multi-agency working for children’s wellbeing. London: Routledge.
  • Daniels, H., Edwards, A., Engeström, Y. & Ludvigsen, S. (Eds.) (2009) Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge.
  • Ellis, V., Edwards, A. & Smagorinsky, P.  (Eds.) (2009) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Being an Expert Professional Practitioner: the relational turn in expertise. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Rickinson, M., Sebba, J. & Edwards, A. (2011) Improving User-engagement in Educational Research. London: Routledge.
  • Hedegaard, M., Edwards, A. & Fleer, M. (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wells, G. & Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2013) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Edwards, A. (Ed.) (2017) Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Hedegaard, M.& Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2019) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (Eds.) (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer.
  • Bound, H., Edwards, A. & Evans, K. (Eds.) (forthcoming) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor and Francis.
  • Hedegaard, M. & Edwards, A. (forthcoming) Taking Children Seriously: a relational approach to Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chapters in Books

  • Edwards, A.  (2009) Becoming a Teacher, in H. Daniels, J. Porter & H. Lauder (Eds.) Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning: vol 1. London: Routledge, pp. 153-164.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Agency and Activity Theory: from the systemic to the relational, in A Sannino, H Daniels & K. Guttierez (Eds.) Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 197-211.
  • Edwards, A. & Kinti I. (2009) Working Relationally at Organisational Boundaries: negotiating expertise and identity, in H. Daniels, A. Edwards, Y. Engeström & S. Ludvigsen (Eds.)  Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge, pp. 126-139.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) How can CHAT help us to understand and develop teacher education?, in V. Ellis, A. Edwards & P. Smagorinsky (Eds.) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge, pp. 63-77.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Learning How to Know Who: professional learning for expansive practice between organisations, in S Ludvigsen, A. Lund, I. Rasmussen & R. Saljo (Eds.) Learning Across Sites. London: Routledge, pp. 17-32.
  • Edwards, A.  (2010) Qualitative Designs and Analysis, in G. MacNaughton, S. Rolfe & I. Siraj-Blatchford (Eds.) Doing Early Childhood Research: Theory and Process: an international perspective 2nd Edition. Melbourne: Allen and Unwin, pp.155-175.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) Expertise in the Children’s Workforce: knowledge and motivation in engagement with children, in M. Hedegaard, A. Edwards & M. Fleer (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 173-190.
  • Edwards, A. & Ellis, V.  (2012) The Professional Development of Teachers: European perspectives, in C. Day (Ed.) International Handbook on Teacher and School Development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) User Engagement and the Processes of Educational Research, in L. Farrell & T. Fenwick (Eds.) Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities. London:  Routledge
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Integrating Children’s Services, in G. Head (Ed.) Professionals, Children and the Community: working together, London: Pearson.
  • Edwards, A. & Thompson, M. (2013) Resourceful Leadership: revealing the creativity of organizational leaders, in A. Sannino & V. Ellis (Eds.) Learning and Collective Creativity: Activity-Theoretical and Sociocultural Studies. London: Routledge.  pp. 49-64.
  • Childs, A., Edwards, A. & McNicholl, J. (2013) Developing a Multi-layered System of Distributed Expertise: What does cultural historical theory bring to understandings of workplace learning in school university partnerships?, in O. McNamara et al. (Eds.) Teacher Learning in the Workplace: widening perspectives on practice and policy. Dordecht: Springer. pp. 29-45.
  • Lundsteen, N. & Edwards, A. (2013) Internship: navigating the practices of an investment bank, in G. Wells &   Edwards (Eds.) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.pp.155-168.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Learning from Experience in teaching; a cultural historical critique, in V. Ellis & J. Orchard (Eds.) Learning Teaching from Experience: Multiple Perspectives, International Contexts. London: Bloomsbury.pp.47-61.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Designing Tasks which Engage Learners with Knowledge, in I. Thompson (Ed.) Task Design,Subject Pedagogy and Student Engagement. London: Routledge. pp. 13-27.
  • Edwards, A. (2016) A Cultural-historical Approach to Practice: working within and across practices, in J. Lynch et al. (Eds.) Practice Theory: Diffractive readings in professional practice and education. London: Routledge.127-140.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural-historical Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: teaching to support student agency, in B. Leibowitz, V. Bozalek & P. Kahn (Eds.) Theorising Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Taylor and Francis. pp.124-138.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Introductory chapter, final chapter and a joint chapter on knowledge exchange in the social sciences with E. Stamou, in A. Edwards (Ed.), Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural Historical Theory and Pedagogy: the influence of Vygotsky on the field, in R. MacLean (Ed.) Handbook on Life in Schools and Classrooms: Past, present and future visions. Dordrecht, Springer. pp. 153-166.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Relational Expertise: a cultural-historical approach to teacher education, in Peters, B. Cowie & I Menter (Eds.) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 555-567.
  • Edwards, A. & Montecinos, C. (2017) Working Relationally on Complex Problems: building the capacity for joint agency in new forms of work, in M. Goller & S. Paloniemi (Eds.) Agency at Work. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 229-247.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) The Dialectic of Person and Practice: how cultural-historical accounts of agency can inform teacher education, in J. Clandinin & J. Husu (Eds.) The Sage Handbook on Research on Teacher Education, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. pp.269-285.
  • Edwards, A. & Hedegaard, M. (2019) Rethinking Professional Support for Challenging Transitions: enabling the agency of children, young people and their families, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 1-18.
  • Edwards, A. & Evangelou, M. (2019) Easing Transitions into School for Children from Socially Excluded ‘Hard to Reach’ Families: from risk and resilience to agency and demand, in M.Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 115-130.
  • Edwards, A. & Fay, Y. (2019) Supporting the Transitions to Work of Autistic Young People: building and using common knowledge, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp 262-278.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp. 1-20.
  • Edwards, A., Chan, J. & Tan, D. (2019) Motive Orientation and the Exercise of Agency: responding to recurrent demands in practices, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp.201-214.
  • Edwards, A. (in press) Learning for a High Skills Economy: what a cultural-historical approach can offer, in H. Bound, A. Chia, J. Tan & R. Lim Wei Ying (Eds.) Flipping the Lens from Teaching to Learning. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Edwards, A. & Sutherland Olsen, D. (forthcoming) Cultural-historical Understandings of Transitions in Changing Workplaces, in H. Bound, A. Edwards, K. Evans, A. Chia (Eds.) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor & Francis.
  • Edwards, A. (forthcoming) A Relational View of a Future-oriented Pedagogy: sustaining the agency of learners and teachers, in N. Hopwood & A. Sannino (Eds.) Agency and Transformation: Motives, mediation and motion. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Refereed Articles

  • Edwards, A. (2009) Understanding Boundaries in Inter-professional Work, The Scottish Educational Review, 41, 1, 5-21.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Relational Agency in Collaborations for the Wellbeing of Children and Young People, Journal of Children’s Services, 4, 1, 33-43.
  • Shaw, I., Morris, K &. Edwards, A. (2009) Technology, Social Services and Organizational Innovation or How Great Expectations in London and Cardiff are Dashed in Lowestoft and Cymtyrch, Journal of Social Work Practice,  23, 4, 383 – 400.
  • Edwards, A., Lunt, I. & Stamou, E. (2010) Inter-professional Work and Expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools, British Educational Research Journal, 36, 1, 27-45.
  • Edwards, A. (2011) Building Common Knowledge at Boundaries between Professional Practices, International Journal of Educational Research 50, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A & Daniels, H. (2012) The knowledge that matters in professional practices Journal of Education and Work 25, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) The role of common knowledge in achieving collaboration across practices Learning Culture and Social Interaction 1, 1, 22-32.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) A Tool for Public Services Research and Development, International Journal of Public Management. 11,1, 21-33.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Discussant’s Comments: Recognising and Realising Teachers’ Professional Agency, Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice. 21, 6, 779-784.
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. & Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: the development of the Oxford Education Deanery narrative, Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373. http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/edui.v6.27724
  • Hopwood, N., Day, C. & Edwards, A. (2016) Partnership Practice as Collaborative Knowledge Work: overcoming common dilemmas through an augmented view of professional expertise, Journal of Children’s Services. 11, 2, 111-123.
  • Engeness, I. & Edwards, A. (2016) The Complexity of Learning: Exploring the Interplay of Different Mediational Means in Group Learning with Digital Tools, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 61, 1, 650-667. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2016.1173093
  • Hopwood, N. & Edwards, A. (2017) How common knowledge is constructed and why it matters in collaboration between professionals and clients, International Journal of Educational Research, 83, 107–119.
  • Edwards, A. (2020) Agency, Common Knowledge and Motive Orientation: working with insights from Hedegaard in research on provision for vulnerable children and young people, Learning Culture and Social Interaction. 26, 100224. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.lcsi.2018.04.004
  • Mjelve, L.H., Nyborg, G., Edwards, A.& Crozier, R. (2019) Teachers’ Understandings of Shyness: psychosocial differentiation for student inclusion, British Educational Research Journal. 45(6), 1295- doi:10.1002/berj.3563
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, H., Edwards, A. & Crozier, R. (2020 ) Teachers’ Strategies for Enhancing Shy Children’s Engagement in Oral Activities: necessary but insufficient? International Journal of Inclusive Education. 1-16. doi:10.1080/13603116.2020.1711538
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A. & Nyborg, G. (2020) Leading for School Inclusion: how school leadership teams support shy students, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 1-14. doi:10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Solberg, S., Edward, A., Mjelve, L.H., & Nyborg, G. (in press). Working relationally with networks of support within schools: Supporting teachers in their work with shy students. Journal of Education for Children Placed at Risk (JESPAR), 1-23. doi.org/10.1080/10824669.2020.1854760
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A., & Nyborg, G. (2020). Leading for school inclusion and prevention? How school leadership teams support shy students and their teachers. Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, 1-14. doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Burn, K. Conway, R., Edwards, A. & Harries, E. (2021) The Role of School-based Research Champions in a School-University Partnership. British Educational Research Journal, 47(3). 616-633. doi.org/10.1002/berj.3675
  • Rickinson, M. & Edwards, A. (2021) The Relational Features of Evidence Use, Cambridge Journal of Education, 51(4), 509-526.  doi.org/10.1080/0305764X.2020.1865877
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, L.H., Edwards, A., Crozier, R. & Coplan, R. (2022) Working relationally with shy students: pedagogical insights from teachers and students. Learning, Culture and Social Interaction. authors.elsevier.com/sd/article/S2210-6561(22)00011-3

Reports

  • Edwards, A. & Stamou, E. (2009) The Development of Preventative Practices in England: implications for the children’s workforce. DCSF: Children’s Workforce Development Council
  • Hannan, S., Canwell, A. Longfils, H. & Edwards, A. (2011) The Resourceful Leader, Nottingham: National College
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Leading the Learning: how the intelligent leader builds capacity. Nottingham: National College.
  • Edwards, A. & Downes, P. (2013) Alliances for Inclusion: cross-sector policy synergies and inter-professional collaboration in and around schools. NESET for the European Commission.
  • Alexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. & Menter, I. (2014) Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools. Oxford University: CitiFoundation.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Inter-professional Working in and around Schools, in C. McLaughlin (Ed.) The Connected School: a design for wellbeing. London: Pearson / NCB.

Geoffrey Walford is Emeritus Professor of Education Policy and an Emeritus Fellow of Green Templeton College at the University of Oxford.

He was previously Reader in Education Policy at Oxford, and Senior Lecturer in Sociology and Education Policy at Aston Business School, Aston University, Birmingham.

He has academic degrees from Oxford, Kent, London and the Open Universities, has authored or edited more than 40 books, and published rather too many academic articles and book chapters. He was Joint Editor of the British Journal of Educational Studies from 1999 to 2002, and was Editor of the Oxford Review of Education from 2004 to 2010. He remains as a Deputy Editor of Ethnography and Education and serves on several editorial boards.

Professor Walford’s main research foci are the relationships between central government policy and local processes of implementation, private schools, choice of schools, religiously-based schools, and ethnographic research methodology. He remains engaged with various scholarly writing activities working, in particular, on issues connected to private schooling for the poor and social justice. He was awarded a DLitt from Oxford University in 2016.

Publications

Major articles and book chapters

  • Geoffrey Walford (2023) ‘Low-fee private schools.’  In Bob Tierney, Fazal Rizvi and Kadriye Wrcikan (editors-in-chief); Fazal Rizvi and Jason Beech (eds.) Section 1, Globalization and shifting geopolitics of education, International Encyclopedia of Education 4th edition, Vol 1 (Oxford: Elsevier) pp.355-365.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2022) ‘Country houses repurposed as private schools: what might be the motivations?’  Oxford Review of Education, 48, 1, pp. 14-27.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2021) ‘Country houses repurposed as private schools: building on inequality.’ Oxford Review of Education, 47, 3, pp. 369-385.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2021) ‘What is worthwhile auto-ethnography? Research in the age of the selfie.’ Ethnography and Education, 16, 1, pp. 31-43.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2020) ‘Interviews and interviewing in the ethnography of education.’ In George W. Noblit. (ed.) Oxford Encyclopedia of Qualitative Research Methods in Education (New York: Oxford University Press) (Reprint) pp. 672-685.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2020) ‘Ethnography is not qualitative.’ Ethnography and Education, 15, 1, pp. 122-136.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2019) ‘The provenance of Stowe. Percy Warrington: the founder schools wished to forget.’ History of Education Researcher, 104, pp. 100-108.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2018) ‘The impossibility of anonymity in ethnographic research.’ Qualitative Research, 18, 5, pp. 516-525.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2018) ‘Interviews and interviewing in the ethnography of education.’Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Education, Editor in Chief: George W. Noblit. On-line. DOI: 10.1093/acrefore/9780190264093.013.320, May, pp. 20.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2018) ‘Recognisable continuity. A defence of multiple methods.’ In Dennis Beach, Carl Bagley, and Sofia Maques da Silva (eds.) The Wiley Handbook of Ethnography of Education (London, Wiley) pp. 17-29.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2017) ‘Ruling-class classification and framing.’ In Agnés Van Zanten (ed.) Elites in Education, Volume 2, National Traditions and Cosmopolitism in Elite Education. (London, Routledge) (Reprint)
  • Geoffrey Walford (2016) ‘Ethnographic methodology: A Virtual Special Issue of Ethnography and Education. Introduction.’ Ethnography and Education.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2015) ‘The globalisation of low-fee private schools’ In Joseph Zajda (ed.) Second International Handbook on Globalisation, Education and Policy Research (Amsterdam, Springer) ISBN: 978-94-017-9492-3, pp. 309-20.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2014) ‘Site selection within comparative case study and ethnographic research.’ (Reprint) In Malcolm Tight (ed.) Case Studies (London, Sage)
  • Ian Macpherson, Susan Robertson and Geoffrey Walford (2014) ‘An introduction to privatisation, education and social justice.’ In Ian Macpherson, Susan Robertson and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) Education, Privatisation, and Social Justice: Case studies from Africa, South Asia, and South East Asia (Abingdon, Symposium) pp. 9-24.
  • Ingrid Lunt and Geoffrey Walford (2014) ‘Contributions to the sociology of education: Past, present and future. A Festschrift for John Furlong.’ Oxford Review of Education, 40, 4, pp. 411-414.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2014) ‘From City Technology Colleges to Free schools: Ideas of social justice.’ Research Papers in Education, 29, 3, pp. 315-329.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2014) ‘Introduction: Academies, Free Schools and social Justice.’ Research Papers in Education, 29, 3, pp. 263-267.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2013) ‘The development of private and public schools in England.’ In Aydin Gürlevik, Christian Palentien and Robert Heyer (eds.) Privatschulen versus staatliche Schulen (Wiesbaden, Germany: Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden) pp. 89-102.  ISBN: (pb) 978-3-531-18199-8; (e-book) 978-3-531-18978-9.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2013) ‘Low-fee private schools: a methodological and political debate.’ In Prachi Srivastava (ed.) Low-Fee Private Schooling: Aggravating equity or mitigating disadvantage? (Oxford: Symposium Books) pp. 199-213. ISBN: 978-1-873927-91-5.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2013) ‘State support for private schooling in India: What do the evaluations of the British Assisted Places Schemes suggest?’ Oxford Review of Education, 39, 4, pp. 533-547.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2013) ‘The development of private and public schools in England.’ In Aydin Gürlevik, Christian Palentien and Robert Heyer (eds.) Privatschulen versus staatliche Schulen (Wiesbaden, Germany: Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden) pp. 89-102.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2013) ‘Low-fee private schools: a methodological and political debate.’ In Prachi Srivastava (ed.) Low-Fee Private Schooling: Aggravating equity or mitigating disadvantage? (Oxford, Symposium Books) pp. 199-213.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2012) ‘Researching the powerful in education: a re-assessment of the problems.’ International Journal for Research and Method in Education, 35, 2, pp. 111-118
  • Geoffrey Walford (2011) ‘Globalization and low-fee private schools?’ Educational Practice and Theory, 33, 1, pp. 37-50.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2011) ‘The Oxford Ethnography Conference: A place in history?’ Ethnography and Education, 6, 2, pp. 133-145.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2011) ‘Low-fee private schools in England and in less economically developed countries. What can we learn from a comparison?’ Compare, 41, 3, pp. 401-413.
  • Eric Tucker, Madhu Viswanathan and Geoffrey Walford (2010) ‘Reflections on social measurement:  How social scientists generate, modify, and validate indicators and scales.’ In Geoffrey Walford, Eric Tucker and Madhu Viswanathan (eds.) The Sage Handbook of Measurement(London, Sage) pp. 1-5.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2010) ‘Faith-based schools in England after ten years of Tony Blair’, in Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Blair’s Educational Legacy? (London, Routledge) pp. 52-62.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2009) ‘For ethnography?’ Ethnography and Education, 4, 3, pp. 273-284.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2009) ‘Private schools in England.’ Zeitschrift für Pädagogik, 55, 5, pp. 716- 731.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2009) ‘The practice of writing ethnographic fieldnotes.’ Ethnography and Education, 4, 2, pp. 117-130.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2009) ‘Symposium review of: John Beck, Meritocracy, Citizenship and Education’ (with Anthony Giddens and Yoshiko Nozaki) British Journal of Sociology of Education, 30, 1, pp. 97-105.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘Finding the limits: autoethnography and being an Oxford University Proctor.’ In Paul Atkinson and Sara Delamont (eds.) Representing Ethnography (London, Sage) pp. 147-162.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘Selecting sites, and gaining ethical and practical access.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.)How to do Educational Ethnography (London, Tufnell Press) pp. 16-38.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘The nature of educational ethnography.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) How to do Educational Ethnography (London, Tufnell Press) pp. 1-15.
  • Martin Forsey, Scott Davies and Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘The globalisation of school choice: an introduction to key issues and concerns.’ In Martin Forsey, Scott Davies and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) The Globalisation of School Schoice? (Abingdon, Symposium Books) pp. 9-25.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘School choice in England: globalisation, policy borrowing or policy corruption? In Martin Forsey, Scott Davies and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) The Globalisation of School Schoice? (Abingdon, Symposium Books) pp. 95-109.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ’Faith-based schools in England after 10 years of Tony Blair.’ Oxford Review of Education, 34, 6, pp. 689-699.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘Muslim schools in England and the Netherlands: sustaining cultural continuity.’ In Zvi Bekerman and Ezra Kopelowitz (eds.) Cultural Education – Cultural Sustainability: Minority, diaspora, indigenous and ethno-religious groups in multicultural societies. (London, Routledge)
  • Geoffrey Walford (2007) ‘Finding the limits: autoethnography and being an Oxford University Proctor.’ In Alan Bryman (ed.) Qualitative Research 2, Volume 3 Issues of Representation and reflexivity (London, Sage) pp. 214-229.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2007) ‘Classification and framing of interviews in ethnographic interviewing. Ethnography and Education, 2, 2, pp. 145-157.
  • Geoffrey Walford and Prachi Srivastava (2007) ‘Examining Private Schooling in Less Economically Developed Countries: Key Issues and New Evidence.’ In Prachi Srivastava and Geoffrey Walford (2007) (eds.) Private Schooling in Less-Economically Developed Countries: Asian and African perspectives (Abingdon, Symposium Books)
  • Geoffrey Walford (2007) ‘Everyone generalizes, but ethnographers should resist doing so.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Methodological Developments in Ethnography (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 12) (Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, Elsevier)
  • Geoffrey Walford (2006) ‘New Christian schools in England: What are the equity mplications?’ International Journal of Learning, 13, 5, pp. 167-176.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2006) ‘From City Technology Colleges to sponsored grant-maintained schools.’ In David Phillips and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) Tracing Education Policy. Selections from the Oxford Review of Education(London, Routledge) pp. 359-375.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2006) ‘Introduction: education and the Labour Government.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Education and the Labour Government. An evaluation of two terms. (London, Routledge).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2005) ‘Learning and the local community: Is community involvement always a good thing?’ International Journal of Learning, 11, pp. 1219-1225.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2005) ‘Research ethical guidelines and anonymity.’ International Journal of Research and Method in Education, 28, 1, pp. 83-93.
  • Holger Daun, Reza Arjmand and Geoffrey Walford (2004) ‘Muslims and education in a global context.’ In Holger Daun and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) Educational Strategies among Muslims in the Context of Globalization. Some National Case Studies. (Leiden, Boston, Brill) pp. 5-36.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2004) ‘Private schooling in England’ (in Chinese) Journal of Non-Government Educational Development, 103, pp. 55-60.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2004) ‘When tradition meets modern law: changing the role of the Oxford University Proctors.’ Research in Education, 72, pp. 103-114.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2004) ‘No discrimination on the basis of irrelevant qualifications.’ Cambridge Journal of Education, 34, 3, pp. 353-361.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2004) ‘Finding the limits: autoethnography and being an Oxford University Proctor.’Qualitative Research, 4, 3, pp. 403-417.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘Country Report on school-based management in England.’ Precedings of the Third International Forum on Educational Reform Education Decentralization Revisited: School-Based Management(Bangkok, Office of the Education Council) pp. 1-23.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘Separate schools for religious minorities in England and the Netherlands: using a framework for the comparison and evaluation of policy.’Research Papers in Education , 18, 3, pp 1-19.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘School choice, educational change and inequality in England.’ In The Organising Committee (eds.) Proceedings of the 37th Annual Conference of the Japan Educational Administration Society(Tokyo, Dojidai Sha, Nichi-nichi Kyoiku Bunko)  pp. 19-49 (in Japanese) pp.147-172 (in English).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘Muslim schools in Britain.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) British Private Schools: research on policy and practice. (London, Woburn Press) pp. 158-174.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘Introduction.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) British Private Schools: research on policy and practice. (London, Woburn Press) pp. 1-8.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘School choice and educational change in England and Wales.’ In  David N. Plank and Gary Sykes (eds.) Choosing Choice: School Choice in International Perspective (New York & London, Teachers College Press) pp. 68-91.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘Education.’ In W. S. F. Pickering (ed.) Durkheim Today, New York, Oxford, Berghahn Books,  pp. 105-115.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘Introduction.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Doing a Doctorate in Educational Ethnography (Studies in  Educational Ethnography, Volume 7) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI, pp. 1-8.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘When policy moves fast, how long can ethnography take?’ In Bradley A. U. Levinson, Sandra L. Cade, Ana Padawer and Ana Patricia Elvir (eds.) Ethnography and Education Policy Across the Americas, Westport, CT, Praeger,  pp. 23-38.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘Why don’t we name our research sites?’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Educational Ethnography and Methodology, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 6) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI, pp. 95-105.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘Educational reform and sociology in England and Wales.’ In David L. Levinson, Peter W. Cookson, Jr., and Alan R. Sadovnik (eds.) Education and Sociology: An Encyclopaedia, New York and London, RoutledgeFalmer, pp. 211-219.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘Classification and framing of the curriculum in evangelical Christian and Muslim schools in England and the Netherlands.’ Educational Studies, 28, 4, pp. 403-419.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘Redefining school effectiveness.’ Westminster Studies in Education, 25, 1, pp. 47-58.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘The state and civil society in education in England: past developments and current problems.’ In Heinz-Dieter Meyer and William Lowe Boyd (eds.) Education between State, Markets, and Civil Society: Comparative perspectives, Mahwah, NJ & London, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, pp. 81-100.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Privatization in industrialized countries.’ In Henry M. Levin (ed.) Privatizing Education. Can the marketplace deliver choice, efficiency, equity, and social cohesion? Boulder, CO  & Oxford, Westview Press, pp. 178-200.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘From common schooling to selection? Affirming and contesting the comprehensive ideal, 1976-2001.’ In Robert Phillips and John Furlong (eds.)  Education, Reform and the State: Politics, Policy and Practice 1976-2001 London & New York, RoutledgeFalmer, pp. 45-57.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Introduction: ethnography and policy.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Ethnography and Education Policy, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 4) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI, pp. 1-9.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Durkheim, democracy and diversity: some thoughts on recent changes in England and Wales.’ In W S F Pickering (ed.) Emile Durkheim: Critical Assessments of Leading Sociologists. Volume VI,London & New York, Routledge, pp. 543-559.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Introduction’ (to Education Section). In W S F Pickering (ed.) Emile Durkheim: Critical Assessments of Leading Sociologists. Volume VI, London & New York, Routledge, pp. 365-371.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Funding for religious schools in England and the Netherlands. Can the piper call the tune?’ Research Papers in Education, 16, 4, pp. 359-380.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Evangelical Christian schools in England and the Netherlands.’  Oxford Review of Education, 27, 4, pp. 529-541.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Building identity through communities of practice: Evangelical Christian schools in the Netherlands.’ International Journal of Education and Religion, 2, 2, pp. 126-143.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘The fate of the new Christian schools: from growth to decline?’ Educational Studies,27, 4, pp. 465-477.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Site selection within comparative case-study and ethnographic research.’ Compare, 31, 2, pp.151-164.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Does the market ensure quality?’ Westminster Studies in Education 24, 1, pp. 23-33.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘School choice and social exclusion in England and Wales.’ In John Sayer and Johan Vanderhoven (eds.) School Choice, Equity and Social Exclusion, Leuven, Garant.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘Introduction.’ In Geoffrey Walford and Caroline Hudson (eds.) Genders and Sexualities in Educational Ethnography, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 3) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI/Elsevier.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘First days in the field: gender and sexuality in an evangelical Christian school.’ In Geoffrey Walford and Caroline Hudson (eds.) Genders and Sexualities in Educational Ethnography, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 3) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI/Elsevier.
  • W S F Pickering and Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘Introduction.’ In W. S.F. Pickering and Geoffrey Walford (eds.)Durkheim’s Suicide: a century of research and debate, London & New York, Routledge, pp. 1-10.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘What’s new about academic capitalism’ Learning & Managing, 6, 2, pp. 174-181.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘Government policy on private schooling in England’ Education and Society, 18, 1, pp. 25-43.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘From City Technology Colleges to sponsored grant-maintained schools’ Oxford Review of Education, 26, 2, pp. 145-158.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘A policy adventure: sponsored grant-maintained schools’ Educational Studies, 26, 2, pp. 247-262.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1999) ‘L’enseignement privé en Angleterre: tendances récentes et problèmes soulevés’Carrefours de l’éducation, 8, pp. 126-139.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1999) ‘Selling your way in: gaining access to research sites.’ In Alexander Massey and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) Explorations in Methodology, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 2)  Stamford, CT, JAI Press,  pp. 1-15.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1999) ‘Educating religious minorities within the English state-maintained sector’International Journal of Educational Management, 13, 2, pp. 98-106.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Durkheim, democracy and diversity: some thoughts on recent changes in England.’ In Geoffrey Walford and W. S. F. Pickering (eds.)  Durkheim and Modern Education, London & New York, Routledge, pp. 125-141.
  • W. S. F. Pickering and Geoffrey Walford (1988) ‘Introduction: Durkheim and education.’ In Geoffrey Walford and W. S. F. Pickering (eds.) Durkheim and Modern Education, London & New York, Routledge, pp. 1-16.
  • Alexander Massey and Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Children learning: Ethnographers learning.’ In Geoffrey Walford and Alexander Massey  (eds.) Children Learning in Context, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 1), Stamford, CT & London, JAI Press, pp. 1-18.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Essay review: Is there a ‘new variant’ diploma disease?’ Oxford Review of Education, 24, 3,  pp. 405-409.
  • David Rigoni and Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Questioning the quick-fix: Assertive Discipline and the 1997 Education White Paper’ Journal of Education Policy, 13, 3, pp. 443-452.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Compulsive writing behaviour: getting it published.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Doing Research About Education, London & Washington D.C., Falmer, pp. 184-198.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Research accounts count.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Doing Research About Education, London & Washington, D.C., Falmer, pp. 1-10.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Reading and writing the small print: The fate of sponsored grant-maintained schools.’  Educational Studies, 24, 2, pp. 241-257.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘School choice and the common good: a reply to Brighouse’ Oxford Review of Education, 23, 4, pp. 517-521.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997)  ‘The 14-19 curriculum in private schools.’ In Sally Tomlinson (ed.) Education 14-19: Critical Perspectives, London & Atlantic Highlands, NJ, Athlone, pp. 101-112.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘Diversity, choice and selection in England and Wales’ Educational Administration Quarterly 33, 2, pp. 158-169.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘Sponsored grant-maintained schools: extending the franchise?’ Oxford Review of Education, 23, 1, pp. 31-44.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘Education and private schools.’ In Anthony Giddens (ed.) Sociology: Introductory readings, Cambridge, Polity, pp. 329-336.
  • Steven Carroll and Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘The child’s voice in school choice’ Educational Management and Administration, 25, 2, pp. 169-180.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘Privatization and selection.’ In Richard Pring and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) Affirming the Comprehensive Ideal, London, Falmer.
  • Steven Carroll and Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘Parents’ responses  to the school quasi-market’ Research Papers in Education, 12, 1, pp. 3-26.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘Power and responsibility in pressure group activity.’ In Keith Watson, Sohan Modgil and Celia Modgil (eds.)  Educational Dilemmas: Debate and diversity, London, Cassell,  pp. 247-253 and 264-265.
  • Steven Carroll and Geoffrey Walford (1996) ‘A panic about school choice’ Educational Studies, 22, 3, pp. 393-407.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1996)  ‘School choice and equity in England and Wales’  Oxford Studies in Comparative Education, 6, 1, pp. 49-62.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1996) ‘Diversity and choice in school education: an alternative view’ Oxford Review of Education,  22, 2, pp. 143-154.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1996)  ‘Faith-based grant-maintained schools: Selective international policy borrowing from The Netherlands’ in John Ahier, Ben Cosin and Margaret Hales (eds.) Diversity and Change: Education, policy and selection, London, Routledge, pp. 63-78.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995)  ‘The Northbourne amendments: Is the House of Lords a garbage can?’ Journal of Education Policy, 10 (5) pp. 413-425.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995) ‘Faith-based schools, diversity and inequity.’ In Gwen Wallace (ed.)  Schools, Markets and Management, Bournmouth, Hyde Publications, pp. 13-20.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995) ‘The Christian Schools Campaign – a successful educational pressure group?’ British Educational Research Journal, 21 (4) pp. 451-464.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995)  ‘Faith-based grant-maintained schools: Selective international policy borrowing from The Netherlands.’ Journal of Education Policy, 10 (2) pp. 245-257.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995) ‘Classification and framing in English public boarding schools.’  In Paul Atkinson, Brian Davies and Sara Delamont (eds.) Discourse and Reproduction. Essays in honor of Basil Bernstein, New Jersey, USA, Hampton Press, pp. 191-207.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994)  ‘A return to selection?’ Westminster Studies in Education, 17, pp. 19-30.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994) ‘Political commitment in the study of the City Technology College, Kingshurst.’  In David Halpin and Barry Troyna (eds.) Researching Education Policy: Ethical and Methodological Issues, London, Falmer, pp. 94-106.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994)  ‘The dilemma of choice in education.’ In Ian Lawrence (ed.) Education Tomorrow, London, Cassell, pp. 130-144.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994)  ‘Reflections on researching the powerful.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Researching the Powerful in Education, London, UCL Press, pp. 222-231.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994)  ‘Ethics and power in a study of pressure group politics.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.)Researching the Powerful in Education, London, UCL Press, pp. 81-93.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994) ‘A new focus on the powerful.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Researching the Powerful in Education, London, UCL Press, pp. 2-11.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994) ‘Educational choice, control and inequity.’ In David Scott (ed.) Accountability and Control in Educational Settings, London, Cassell, pp. 73-86.
  • Colin Poyntz and Geoffrey Walford (1994) ‘The new Christian schools: A survey.’  Educational Studies, 20, 1, pp. 127-143.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994) ‘The new religious grant-maintained schools.’ Educational Management and Administration, 22, 2, pp. 123-130.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994)   ‘Weak choice, strong choice and the new Christian schools.’ In J. Mark Halstead (ed.)  Parental Choice and Education: Principles, policies and practice,  London, Kogan Page, pp. 139-150.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1993)  ‘Self-managing schools, choice and equity.’ In John Smyth (ed.) A Socially Critical View of the Self-Managing School, Basingstoke, Falmer, pp. 229-244.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1993)  ‘Selection for secondary schooling.’  In Briefings for the Paul Hamlyn Foundation National Commission on Education,  London, Heinemann, pp. 89-102.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1993) ‘The real lessons in school reform from Britain.’ Educational Policy, 7, 2, pp. 212-222.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1993) ‘Girls’ private schooling: past and present.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) The Private Schooling of Girls: Past and present, London, Woburn Press, pp. 9-32.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1992)  Selection for Secondary Schooling National Commission on Education Briefing Paper No. 7,  October.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1992) ‘Educational reform in the 1980s: National case studies. Great Britain.’ In Peter W. Cookson, Jr., Alan R. Sadovnik and Susan F. Semel (eds.) International Handbook of Educational Reform, Westport, CT, USA, Greenwood Press, pp. 209-227.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1992) ‘Educational choice and equity in Great Britain.’ Educational Policy (USA), 6, (2) pp. 123-138.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1992) ‘The reform of higher education.’ In Madeline Arnot and Len Barton (eds.)  Voicing Concerns: Sociological Perspectives on contemporary educational reforms, Wallingford, Triangle Books, pp. 186-200.
  • Sharon Gewirtz, Henry Miller and Geoffrey Walford (1991) ‘Parents’ individualist and collectivist strategies at the City Technology College, Kingshurst.’ International Studies in Sociology of Education, 1, pp. 173-191.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991)  ‘The changing relationship between government and higher education in Britain.’  In Guy Neave and Frans van Vught (ed.) Prometheus Bound. The changing relationship between government and higher education in Western Europe, Oxford, Pergamon, pp. 165-183.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991) ‘Researching the City Technology College, Kingshurst.’  In Geoffrey Walford (ed.)Doing Educational Research, London, Routledge, pp. 82-100.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991)  ‘Reflexive accounts of doing educational research.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.)  Doing Educational Research, London, Routledge, pp. 1-17.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991)  ‘Choice of school at the first City Technology College.’ Educational Studies, 17, 1, pp. 65-75.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991)  ‘City Technology Colleges: A private magnetism?’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.)  Private Schooling: Tradition, change and diversity, London, Paul Chapman, pp. 158-76.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991) ‘The reluctant private sector: of small schools, people and politics.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Private Schooling: tradition, change and diversity, London Paul Chapman, pp. 115-32.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1990)  ‘Developing choice in British education.’  Compare. A Journal of Comparative Education, 20, 1, pp 22-56.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1990) ‘The 1988 Education Reform Act for England and Wales: Paths to privatization.’ Educational Policy, 4, 2, pp. 127-44.
  • Mark H. Robson and Geoffrey Walford (1989) ‘Independent schools and tax policy under Mrs Thatcher.’ Journal of Education Policy, 4, 2, pp. 149-62.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1989) ‘Scotland: Changes in government policy towards private schools.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.)  Private Schools in Ten Countries: Policy and practice, London, Routledge, pp. 32-56.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1989)  ‘Private schools policy and practice in comparative perspective.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Private Schools in Ten Countries: Policy and practice, London, Routledge, pp. 1-7.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1989)  ‘Bullying in public schools: Myth and reality.’ In Delwyn P. Tattum and David Lane (eds.) Bullying in Schools, London, Trentham Books, pp. 81-88.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1988)  ‘Young people’s views about the Youth Training Scheme in Scotland.’ British Journal of Sociology of Education, 9, 4, pp. 437-51.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1988)  ‘Shouts of joy and cries of pain: investigating young people’s comments on leaving school and entering the labour market.’ In David Raffe (ed.)  Education and the Youth Labour Market: Schooling and scheming, Lewes, Falmer, pp. 243-65.
  • Geoffrey Walford, June Purvis and Andrew Pollard (1988)  ‘Ethnography, policy and the emergence of the new vocationalism.’  In Andrew Pollard, June Purvis and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) Education, Training and the New Vocationalism: Experience and policy, Milton Keynes, Open University Press, pp. 3-14.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1988) ‘Training the elite – for education, training and jobs.’ Collected Original Resources in Education, 12, 1, pp. 1-19.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1988)  ‘The privatisation of British higher education.’ European Journal of Education, 23, 1/2, pp. 47-64.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1988)  ‘The Scottish Assisted Places Scheme. A comparative study of the origins, nature and practice of the APS in Scotland, England & Wales.’ Journal of Education Policy, 3, 2, pp. 137-53.
  • Mark H. Robson and Geoffrey Walford (1988)  ‘U.K. tax policy and independent schools.’ British Tax Review, 2, pp. 38-54.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1987)  ‘How important is the independent sector in Scotland’ Scottish Educational Review, 19, 2, pp. 108-21.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1987)  ‘How dependent is the independent sector?’ Oxford Review of Education, 13, 3, pp. 275-96.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1987)  ‘Research role conflicts and compromises in public schools.’  In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Doing Sociology of Education, Lewes, Falmer, pp. 45-65.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1987)  ‘The research process.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Doing Sociology of Education, Lewes, Falmer, pp. 1-15.
  • Geoffrey Walford and Sïan Jones (1986) ‘The Solihull adventure. An attempt to reintroduce selective education.’  Journal of Education Policy, 1, 3, pp. 239-53.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1986)  ‘Ruling-class classification and framing.’  British Educational Research Journal, 12, 2, pp. 183-95.
  • Henry Miller and Geoffrey Walford (1986) ‘A case study of financial constraints in British universities.’ IHELG Monograph, Number 86/5, Institute for Higher Education Law and Governance, University of Houston, Texas, USA.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1985)  ‘The influence of external pressure groups on the school curriculum: Two examples.’  Collected Original Resources in Education, 9, 2, pp. 1-45.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1985)  ‘The construction of a curriculum area.’ British Journal of Sociology of Education, 6, 2, pp. 155-71.
  • Henry Miller and Geoffrey Walford (1985)  ‘University cut and thrust.’  In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Schooling in Turmoil, Beckenham, Croom Helm, pp. 244-68.
  • Richard Thompson and Geoffrey Walford (1985)  ‘Teachers learning about industry: The two curricula and cultural disadvantage.’  In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Schooling in Turmoil, Beckenham, Croom Helm, pp. 59-83.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1984)  ‘The changing professionalism of public school teachers.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) British Public Schools: Policy and practice, Lewes, Falmer, pp. 111-35.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1984)   ‘The numbering of postgraduate research.’  Higher Education Review, 16, 2, pp. 61-65.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1983)  ‘Science education and sexism in the Soviet Union.’  School Science Review, 85, 2, pp. 213-24.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1983)  ‘Postgraduate education and the student’s contribution to research.’ British Journal of Sociology of Education, 4, 3, pp. 241-54.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1983) ‘Research state and research style: A sociological analysis of postgraduate education.’  Collected Original Resources in Education, 7, 1, pp. 1-108.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1983)  ‘Science textbook images and the reproduction of sexual divisions in society.’ Research in Science and Technological Education, 1, 1, pp. 65-72.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1983)  ‘Parental attitudes and girls in physical science.’ School Science Review, 64, pp. 566-67.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1983)  ‘Girls in boys’ public schools: A prelude to further research.’ British Journal of Sociology of Education, 4, 1, pp. 39-54.
  • Leo Raby and Geoffrey Walford (1981) ‘Job status aspirations and their determinants for middle and lower stream pupils in an urban, multi-racial comprehensive school.’ British Educational Research Journal, 7, 2, pp. 173-81.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1981)  ‘Classification and framing in higher education.’ Studies in Higher Education, 6, 2, pp. 147-58.
  • Leo Raby and Geoffrey Walford (1981) ‘Career related attitudes and their determinants for middle- and low-stream pupils in an urban, multi-racial comprehensive school.’ Research in Education, 25, pp. 19-35.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1980) ‘Why physics students start doctorates.’ Studies in Higher Education, 5, 1, pp. 77-80.

Books

  • Geoffrey Walford (2006) Markets and Equity in Education London, Continuum, ISBN: 0 8264 8735 1.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2005) Private Education: tradition and continuity
    London, Continuum, ISBN: 0 8264 8599 5.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) Doing Qualitative Educational Research: a personal guide to the research process, London, Continuum. ISBN: 0-8264-4701-5,  0-8264-4702-3.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) Policy, Politics and Education – sponsored grant-maintained schools and religious diversity, Aldershot, Ashgate. ISBN: 0-7456-1031-4.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1996) Public School, Japanese edition of Life in Public Schools, translated by Yo Takeuchi. Japan, Sekai Shisosha Kyogakusha. ISBN: 4-7907-0626-5.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995) Educational Politics: Pressure groups and faith-based schools, Aldershot, Avebury, ISBN: 1-85628-907-9.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994) Choice and Equity in Education, London, Cassell, ISBN: 0-304-32775-1,  0-304-32774-3.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1993) Contemporary British Education and Privatization, Japanese edition of Privatization and Privilege in Education with new forward and postscript, translated by Norio Iwahashi, Kyoto, Japan, Houritu-Bunka-sha, ISBN: 4589-01705-9.
  • Geoffrey Walford and Henry Miller (1991) City Technology College, Milton Keynes, Open University Press, ISBN: 0335 09275 6.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1990) Privatization and Privilege in Education, London & New York, Routledge, ISBN: 0415 04247 X,  0415 04248 8.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1987) Restructuring Universities: Politics and power in the management of change, Beckenham, Croom Helm, ISBN: 07099 3694 X.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1986) Life in Public Schools, London, Methuen, ISBN: 0416 37170 1,  0416 37180 9.
  • Richard Thompson and Geoffrey Walford (1983) Teachers into Industry, Birmingham, AEEM, ISBN: 0903 703 14 9.

Edited books

  • Prachi Srivastava and Geoffrey Walford (2018) Non-State Actors in Education in the Global South. London, Routledge. ISBN: 978-1-138-57067-2 (hb), 143 pp.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2016)(ed.) Academies, Free Schools and social Justice (Didcot, Routledge) ISBN 13: 978-1-138-96007-7, 118 pp.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2016)(ed.) Privatization, Education and Social Justice (Didcot, Routledge) ISBN 13: 978-1-138-59439-7, 150 pp.
  • Ian Macpherson, Susan Robertson and Geoffrey Walford (eds.)(2014) Education, Privatisation, and Social Justice: Case studies from Africa, South Asia, and South East Asia (Abingdon, Symposium)
  • Geoffrey Walford, Eric Tucker and Madhu Viswanathan (2010) (eds.) The Sage Handbook of Measurement (London, Sage) ISBN: 978-1-4129-4814-2.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2010) (ed.) Blair’s Educational Legacy? (London, Routledge) ISBN: 0-415-48305-0.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) (ed.) How to do Educational Ethnography, London, Tufnell Press, ISBN: 978-1-872767-92-5 (pb).
  • Martin Forsey, Scott Davies and Geoffrey Walford (2008(eds.) The Globalisation of School VChoice? Abingdon, Symposium Books, ISBN: 978-1-873927-12-0 (pb).
  • Prachi Srivastava and Geoffrey Walford (2007) (eds.) Private Schooling in Less-Economically Developed Countries: Asian and African Perspectives Abingdon, Symposium Books. ISBN: 978-1-873927-85-4 (pb).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2007) (ed.) Methodological Developments in Ethnography (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 12) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, Elsevier.  ISBN: 0-7623-1437-0 (hb).
  • David Phillips and Geoffrey Walford (2006) (eds.) Tracing Education Policy: Selections for the Oxford Review of Education Abingdon, Routledge. ISBN: 0-413-39861-4 (hb).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2006) (ed.) Education and the Labour Government: an evaluation of two termsAbingdon, Routledge. ISBN: 0 415 36870 7 (hb).
  • Geoff Troman, Bob Jeffrey and Geoffrey Walford (2005) (eds.) Methodological issues and practices in Ethnography. (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 11) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, Elsevier.  ISBN: 0-7623-1252-1 (hb).
  • Geoff Troman, Bob Jeffrey and Geoffrey Walford (2004) (eds.) Identity, Agency, and Social Institutions in Educational Ethnography. (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 10) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, Elsevier. ISBN: 0-7623-1144-4 (hb).
  • Bob Jeffrey and Geoffrey Walford (2004) (eds.)Ethnographies of Educational and Cultural Conflicts: Strategies and resolutions. (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 9) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, Elsevier. ISBN: 07623-11126 (hb).
  • Holger Daun and Geoffrey Walford (2004) (eds.) Educational Strategies among Muslims in the Context of Globalization. Leiden, Brill. ISBN: 90-04-13675-4 (hb).
  • Geoffrey Walford and W. S. F. Pickering (2003) (ed.) Durkheim and Modern Education, Japanese Edition. Tokyo, Tokyo Metropolitan University Press. ISBN: 4-88683-496-5 (hb).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) (ed.) British Private Schools: research on policy and practice, London, Woburn Press. ISBN: 0-7130-0228-X,  0-7130-4048-3.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) (ed.) Investigating Educational Policy through Ethnography, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume  Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-1018-9 (hb).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) (ed.) Doing a Doctorate in Educational Ethnography, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 7) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-0906-7 (hb).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) (ed.) Debates and Developments in Ethnographic Methodology, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 6) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-0893-1.
  • Phil Carspecken and Geoffrey Walford (2001) (eds.) Critical Educational Ethnography,
    (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 5) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-0797-8.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) (ed.) Ethnography and Education Policy, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 4) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-0768-4.
  • Geoffrey Walford and Caroline Hudson (2000) (eds.) Genders and Sexualities in Educational Ethnography, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 3) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-0738-2.
  • W. S. F. Pickering and Geoffrey Walford (2000) (eds.) Durkheim’s Suicide: a century of research and debate, London & New York, Routledge. ISBN: 0-415-20582-4.
  • Alexander Massey and Geoffrey Walford (1999) (eds.) Explorations in Methodology, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 2) Stamford, CT, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-0563-0.
  • Geoffrey Walford and Alexander Massey (1998) (eds.) Children Learning in Context, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 1). London & Greenwich, CT, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-76230-436-7.
  • Geoffrey Walford and W. S. F. Pickering (1998) (eds.) Durkheim and Modern Education, London & New York, Routledge. ISBN: 0-415-18168-2.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1998) (ed.) Doing Research about Education, London & Washington D.C., Falmer. ISBN: 0-7507-0782-8,  0-7507-0783-6.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) (ed.) Choice, Diversity and Equity in Secondary Schooling, Special Issue of Oxford Review of Education. ISSN:  0305-4985 .
  • Richard Pring and Geoffrey Walford (1997) (eds.) Affirming the Comprehensive Ideal, London & Washington D.C., Falmer. ISBN: 0-7507-0619-8,  0-7507-0620-1.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1996) (ed.) School Choice and the Quasi-Market, Special Issue of Oxford Studies in Comparative Education, Wallingford, Triangle Books. ISBN: 1-873927-23-1.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995) (ed.) La Otra Cara de la Investigación Educativa, Spanish edition of Doing Educational Research, translated by Javier Orduna Cosmen. Madrid, La Muralla. ISBN: 84-7133-646-4.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994) (ed.) Researching the Powerful in Education, London, UCL Press, ISBN: 1-85728-133-0, 1-85728-134-9.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1993) (ed.) The Private Schooling of Girls: Past and present, London, Woburn Press, ISBN: 0-7130-0186-0.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1992) (ed.) Privatne Skole. Iskustva u deset zemalja, Croatian edition of Private Schools in Ten Countries, translated by Mirna Varlandy Supek, Zagreb, Croatia, EDUCA Publishing House, ISBN: 86-7841-002-7.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991) (ed.) Doing Educational Research, London, Routledge, ISBN: 0415 05289 0,  0415 05290 4.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991) (ed.) Private Schooling: Tradition, change and diversity, London, Paul Chapman, ISBN: 185396 116 7.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1989) (ed.) Private Schools in Ten Countries: Policy and practice, London & New York, Routledge, ISBN: 0415 03464 7.
  • Andrew Pollard, June Purvis and Geoffrey Walford (1988) (eds.) Education, Training and the New Vocationalism: experience and policy, Milton Keynes & Philadelphia, Open University Press, ISBN: 0335 15845 5,  0335 15844 7.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1987) (ed.) Doing Sociology of Education, Lewes & Philadelphia, Falmer, ISBN: 085000 145 6,  085000 146 4.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1985) (ed.) Schooling in Turmoil, Beckenham, Croom Helm, ISBN: 07099 3618 4.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1984) (ed.) British Public Schools: Policy and practice,
    Lewes & Philadelphia, Falmer, ISBN: 0905 273 84 2,  0905 273 83 4.

Anne’s main areas of research in Mathematics Education are exemplification and task design in mathematics teaching and learning, from a variation theory perspective; the role of mathematics education in social justice issues; the use of fine-grained approaches to analysis of mathematics interaction within socio-cultural perspectives and the school mathematics curriculum.

Detailed information, papers, presentations and activities can be found on her website at pmtheta.com and on researchgate.net.

Anne convened and co-edited an Study on Task Design for the International Committee on Mathematics Education and has co-authored a book about learning key ideas in secondary mathematics – Key Ideas in Teaching Mathematics for Oxford University Press.

Her most recent publication is the book: Care in Mathematics Education published by Palgrave-Macmillan.

She is a member of the Association of Teachers of Mathematics (ATM), the British Society for Research into the Learning of Mathematics, the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education and the Higher Education Academy and the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group. She is a Fellow of the International Society for Design and Development in Education.  In retirement she runs, with her husband John Mason, free workshops for teachers and others on key conceptual themes that run throughout mathematics (see pmtheta@home on pmtheta.com).

Anne is a member of the Quaker Values in Education Group of the Society of Friends, see: Rowe, D. and Watson, A. (eds.) (2018)  Faith and Experience in Education: essays on Quaker perspectives. London: Trentham Press.

Activities in curriculum
  • Two syntheses of research about how children learn mathematics for the Nuffield Foundation: Key Understandings in Learning Mathematics (with Nunes and Bryant) and Key Ideas in Teaching Mathematics (with Jones and Pratt).
  • Member of the expert drafting panel for the primary and secondary mathematics National Curriculum for the Department for Education.
  • Curriculum Advisor to the Welsh Assembly.
Publications
Selected recent papers
  • Biza, I., Hewitt, A., Watson, A., Mason, J. (2019) Generalization Strategies in Finding the nth Term Rule for Simple Quadratic Sequences. International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, (), 1-22 DOI 10.1007/s10763-019-10009-0
  • Venkat, H., Askew, M., Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2019) Architecture of Mathematical Structure. FLM 39(1), 19-23.
  • Biza, I., Hewitt, A., Watson, A., Mason, J. (2019) Generalization Strategies in Finding the nth Term Rule for Simple Quadratic Sequences. International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, (), 1-22 DOI 10.1007/s10763-019-10009-0
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018) A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice.  73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • Al-Murani, T., Kilhamn, C., Morgan, D., & Watson, A. (2018). Opportunities for learning: the use of variation to analyse examples of a paradigm shift in teaching primary mathematics in England. Research in Mathematics Education, 1-19.
  • Watson, A., Ayalon, M., & Lerman, S. (2018). Comparison of students’ understanding of functions in classes following English and Israeli national curricula. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 97(3), 255-272.
  • Ayalon, M., Watson, A. & Lerman, S. (2016) Students’ conceptualisations of function revealed through definitions and examples. Research in Mathematics Education. 19(1), 1-19
  • Watson, A. (2016) Pedagogy of variations: synthesis of various notions of variation pedagogy in Huang, R. & Li, Y. (eds.) Teaching and learning mathematics through variation. p85-105. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers
  • Ayalon, M., Watson, A. & Lerman, S. (2016) Reasoning about variables in 11 to 18 year olds: informal, schooled and formal expression in learning about functions. Mathematics Education Research Journal. 28(3), 379-404.
  • Ayalon, M., Watson, A., & Lerman, S. (2015). Progression Towards Functions: Students’ Performance on Three Tasks About Variables from Grades 7 to 12. International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, 90(3), 321-339
  • Ayalon, M., Watson, A. and Lerman, S. (2015) Functions represented as linear sequential data: relationships between presentation and student responses Educational Studies in Mathematics.Online DOI 10.1007/s10649-015-9628-9
  • Watson, A. and Ohtani, M. (2015) Themes and issues in mathematics education concerning task design: Editorial introduction. In Watson, A. and Ohtani, M. (eds.) Task Design in Mathematics Education: An ICMI study.  (pp. 3-18 ) Heidelberg: Springer
  • Watson, A. and Thompson, D. (2015) Design issues related to text-based tasks. In Watson, A. and Ohtani, M. (eds.) Task Design in Mathematics Education: An ICMI study.  (pp.143-190) Heidelberg: Springer.
  • Watson, A., De Geest, E. (2014) Department-initiated change. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(3), 351-368.
Selected Books
  • Watson, A. (2021) Care in Mathematics Education: Alternative educational spaces and practices. Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Watson, A. (ed.) (2018) Variation in mathematics: A collection of writings from ATM Mathematics Teaching. Association of Teachers of Mathematics, Derby, UK.
  • Watson, A. and Ohtani, M. (2015) (Eds.) Task Design in Mathematics Education: An ICMI study.  Heidelberg: Springer.
  • Watson, A.,  Jones, K. and Pratt, D. (2013)  Key Ideas in Teaching Mathematics: Research-based guidance for ages 9-19 (Oxford University Press + Nuffield website)
  • Watson and P. Winbourne (eds.) (2007) New Directions for Situated Cognition in Learning Mathematics, pub. Springer
  • Watson, A. (2006) Raising Achievement in Secondary Mathematics Maidenhead, Open University Press
  • Watson, A. and Mason, J. (2005) Mathematics as a constructive activity: learners generating examples. Lawrence Erlbaum Publishers.

David Phillips is Emeritus Professor of Comparative Education, and Emeritus Fellow of St Edmund Hall.

A linguist by origin, David Phillips now works exclusively on various aspects of comparative and international education, with a particular focus on policy issues in historical context. He is the author of many publications, especially on education in Germany (more particularly in the post-war and post-unification periods) and on policy ‘borrowing’ in education. He has edited  Comparative Education, Research in Comparative and International Education, and the Oxford Review of Education and  and serves on the editorial boards of various other journals; he also edits the book series Oxford Studies in Comparative Education. He is co-chair of the Anglo-German Educational Research Group (www.aerg.org)

He has been Chair of the British Association for Comparative and International Education (BAICE). In 1990-91 he served on a commission of the German Wissenschaftsrat which reported to the German government on the future of teacher education in the territory of the former German Democratic Republic, and he has (2003-4) been a member of a commission appointed by the Minister for Science, Culture and the Arts in Baden-Württemberg with the task of evaluating educational studies in higher education in that state of the Federal Republic of Germany. He has evaluated projects for the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft and for other research bodies. He is a Fellow of the Social Sciences Academy and a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society.

Professor Phillips’s main teaching involved theoretical and methodological issues in comparative education, educational policy in Western Europe (particularly EU countries) and in Eastern Europe, in Japan, and in the United States. Many of his doctoral students focused on education in Germany and Japan, and on a range of topics involving education and training policy in the European Union as well as on aspects of educational policy borrowing in a variety of contexts.

Publications
  • Zur Universitätsreform in der Britischen Besatzungszone 1945-1948, Böhlau 1983
  • (Editor): Hochschuloffiziere und Wiederaufbau des Hochschulwesens in Westdeutschland 1945-1952, Teil 1: Die Britische Zone, Lax, 1990
  • (Editor): Lessons of Cross-National Comparison in Education, Triangle Books, 1992
  • (Editor, with Michael Kaser): Education and Economic Change in Eastern Europe, Triangle Books, 1992
  • Pragmatismus und Idealismus: Das ‘Blaue Gutachten’ und die Britische Hochschulpolitik in Deutschland 1948, Böhlau, 1995
  • (Editor, with others): Education for Reconstruction, Symposium Books, 1998
  • (Editor): Education in Germany: Tradition and Reform in Historical Context, Routledge, 1995
  • (Editor, with Michael Kaser): Aspects of Education and the European Union, Triangle Books, 1995
  • (Editor, with others): Learning From Comparing: New Directions in Comparative Educational Research , Vol. 1, Contexts, Classrooms and Outcomes, Symposium Books, 1999 (with Robin Alexander and Patricia Broadfoot); Vol.2, Policy, Professionals and Development,: Symposium Books, 2000 (with Robin Alexander and Marilyn Osborn)
  • (Editor): Education in Eastern Germany Since Unification, Symposium Books, 2000
  • ‘Reconstructing Education in Germany: Some Similarities and Contrasts in the Post-War and Post-Unification Rethinking in Educational Provision’, in: Leslie J. Limage (ed): Democratizing Education and Educating Democratic Citizens: International and Historical Perspectives, New York (Routledge/Falmer), 2001
  • ‘Helena Deneke and the Women of Germany. A Note on Post-War Reconstruction’, German Life and Letters, Vol.53 No.1, 2000
  • Reflections on British Interest in Education in Germany in the Nineteenth Century. (A Progress Report), Educa, Lisbon, 2002
  • ‘Comparative Historical Studies in Education: Problems of Periodisation Reconsidered’, British Journal of Educational Studies, Vol.50, No.3, 2002
  • ‘Beyond Travellers’ Tales: Some Nineteenth-Century British Commentators on Education in Germany’, Oxford Review of Education, Vol.26 No.1, 2000
  • ‘Comparative Studies and “Cross-National Attraction” in Education: a typology for the analysis of English interest in educational policy and provision in Germany, Educational Studies, Vol.28, No.4, 2002 (with Kimberly Ochs)
  • ‘Processes of Policy Borrowing in Education: Some Explanatory and Analytical Devices, (with Kimberly Ochs), Comparative Education, Vol. 39, No.4, 2003
  • (Editor, with Roger Goodman): Can the Japanese Change Their Education System? Symposium Books, 2003
  • (Editor, with Hubert Ertl): Implementing European Union Education and Training Policy: A Comparative Study of Issues in Four Member States, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2003
  • Articles on ‘Helena Deneke’, ‘Evelyn Spearing’, and ‘Edith Wardale’, New Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004
  • ‘Researching Policy Borrowing: Some Methodological Problems in Comparative Education’, British Educational Research Journal, Vol.30 No.6, 2004 (with Kimberly Ochs)
  • ‘A Typology of Cross-National Attraction in Education’, in: Gita Steiner-Khamsi (ed.): The Global Politics of Educational Borrowing and Lending, Teachers College Press, 2004
  • (Editor, with Kimberly Ochs): Educational Policy Borrowing: Historical Perspectives, Symposium Books, 2004
  • ‘Policy Borrowing in Education: Frameworks for Analysis’, in: Joseph Zajda (ed.): International Handbook on Globalisation, Education and Policy Research: Global Pedagogies and Policies, Springer, 2005
  • ‘Comparative Education: An Approach to Educational Inquiry’, in: Clifton Conrad and Ronald Serlin (eds.): The Sage Handbook on Research in Education: Engaging Ideas and Enriching Inquiry, Sage, 2005
  • ‘Michael Sadler and Comparative Education’, Oxford Review of Education, Vol. 32, No.1, 2006
  • Comparative and International Education: An Introduction to Theory, Method and Practice, Continuum, 2006 (with Michele Schweisfurth)
  • (Editor): Special issue of Comparative Education on ‘Mapping EU Education and Training Policy’, Vol.42, No.1, 2006
  • (Editor): Special issue of Oxford Review of Education on ‘Comparative Inquiry and Educational Policy Making’, Vol.42, No.3, 2006
  • The German Example: English Interest in Educational Provision in Germany Since 1800, Continuum 2011
  • ‘Aspects of Education for Democratic Citizenship in Post-War Germany, Oxford Review of Education, Vol.38, No.6, 2012
  • Investigating Education in Germany: Historical Studies from a British Perspective, Routledge 2015
  • Educating the Germans. People and Policy in the British Zone of Germany, 1945-1949, 2018
Research

David Phillips’s main research interests are in education in Germany, transition in education in eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, educational policy ‘borrowing’, theoretical perspectives in comparative education, and EU education and training policy.

Much of David Phillips’s recent research has been in the area of educational policy borrowing and in EU education and training policy. He recently (1998-2002 inclusive) directed a five-year EU-funded project (PRESTIGE – ‘Problems of Educational Standardisation and Transition in a Global environment’) in this latter area, and oversaw and contributed to the many publications which emerged from the project. Currently the focus of his work is on British interest in educational provision in Germany over the past 200 years. In 2005, together with Alis Oancea, he organised an international seminar funded by the European Science Foundation on the subject ‘15 Years On: Post-communist transitions and European integration of central and eastern European Countries’.

One of his recent books is The German Example: English Interest in Educational Provision in Germany Since 1800 (Continuum,2011), and he has most recently published Educating the Germans, a study of British educational policy in occupied Germany, 1945-1949.  The research for this book was supported by a Leverhulme Trust Emeritus Fellowship awarded in 2012. In 2015 Routledge published Investigating Education in Germany: Historical Studies from a British Perspective. 

Professor of Sociology of Education in the Department of Education from 2010-2015, and before that Director of the Centre for Educational Sociology (CES), University of Edinburgh, Jenny also worked at Strathcyde, Keele, UWE Bristol, and the Open University.

She is an Honorary Professorial Visiting Fellow in the School of Social and Political Sciences, the University of Edinburgh, and has an attachment to the University of Umea, Sweden. She is a Fellow of the British Academy and has been a visiting scholar at Helsinki University, Finland. She holds an honorary doctorate from Turku University, Finland and is a member of the ESF College of Expert Reviewers. She teaches on the EU funded summer school in European Education Studies (SUSEES). The MOOC may be accessed here http://www.susees.eu/mooc-2017-lecture-2-governing-education-europe-changing-role-knowledge/

Research

Jenny’s most recent funded research was a Leverhulme Emeritus Fellowship, on Governing Education: knowledge and policy in England and Scotland since 1986. The study investigates the changing relationship between knowledge and policy in governing education in the period 1986-2015 in England and Scotland.

Jenny also continues to research and publish on education policy with a focus on governance and governing, through investigation of the resources that are being mobilized by new governing forms and through new policy technologies. She works in collaboration with colleagues in the UK and Europe, located in a variety of disciplines-including political science and social policy.

Publications
Recent books
  • Ozga, J (2016) (ed) Sage Library of Educational Thought and Practice: Sociology of Education (four volumes)
  • Fenwick. T., Mangez, E., and Ozga.J. (Eds) (2014) Governing Knowledge: Comparison, Knowledge-Based Technologies and Expertise in the Regulation of Education, (World Yearbook of Education 2014) London, Routledge
  • 2011: Fabricating Quality in Europe: data and education governance (edited with Peter Dahler-Larsen, Christina Segerholm and Hannu Simola London, Routledge
  • 2007: Lingard, B and Ozga, J (eds) The Routledge Reader in Education Policy and Politics, London, Routledge.
  • 2006: Ozga, J. Seddon T and Popkewitz T.S. (eds) Research and Policy: steering the knowledge-based Economy (World Yearbook of Education 2006) London, Routledge
Recent articles
  • Ozga, Jenny (2021) Problematising policy: the development of (critical) policy sociology, Critical Studies in Education, 62:3, 290-305, DOI: 10.1080/17508487.2019.1697718
  • Ozga, Jenny (2021) Who governs? Political leadership in transnational times, School Leadership & Management, 41:1-2, 6-21, DOI: 10.1080/13632434.2020.1789857
  • Ozga, Jenny (2020) The politics of accountability. Journal of Educational Change 21, 19–35 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10833-019-09354-2
  • Ozga, Jenny, & Arnott, M. A. (2019). Governando para além do PISA: conhecimento, redes e narrativas. [Governing Beyond PISA: knowledge, networks and narratives] Roteiro,44(3), 1-22. https://doi.org/10.18593/r.v44i3.21004
  • Ozga, J (2017) ‘Education policy should not be driven by performance data’ Nature: Human Behaviour Vol 1 Issue 1 http://www.nature.com/articles/s41562-016-0014
  • Ozga, Jenny (2016) Trust in numbers? Digital Education Governance and the inspection process  European Educational Research Journal Vol. 15(1) 69–81
  • Margaret Arnott & Jenny Ozga (2016) Education and nationalism in Scotland: governing a ‘learning nation’, Oxford Review of Education, 42:3, 253-265, DOI: 10.1080/03054985.2016.1184865
  • Ozga J and Lawn, M (2014) Frameworks of Regulation: Evidence, Knowledge and Judgement in Inspection Introduction to Special issue of Sisyphus, Journal of Education Volume 2 Issue 1 pp 7-16 (available at http://revista.rcap.pt/sisyphus)
  • Ozga, J (2014) Knowledge, Inspection and the Work of Governing Special issue of Sisyphus, Journal of Education Volume 2 Issue 1 pp16-40 (available at http://revista.rcap.pt/sisyphus)
  • Ozga, J and Lawn, M (2014) Inspectorates and Politics-the trajectories of inspection in England and Scotland  Revue Francaise de Pedagogie 186 pp11-23
  • Ozga, J Baxter, J, Clarke, J. Grek, S and Lawn M (2013) ‘The Politics of Educational Change: Governing and School Inspection in England and Scotland’ Swiss Journal of Sociology 39(2) 205-224.
  • Ozga J (2013) ‘Accountability as a Policy Technology: accounting for education performance in Europe’ International Review of Administrative Science 79 (2) 292-309.
  • Grek, S Lawn, M Ozga, J and Segerholm, C (2013) ‘Governing by Inspection? European Inspectorates and the creation of a European Education Policy Space Comparative Education, 49 (4) 486-502
  • Grek S and Ozga J (2012) Governing through Learning: School Self-Evaluation as a Knowledge-based Regulatory Tool. Recherches sociologiques et anthropologiqes 2012/2 83-103
  • Ozga J (2012) ‘Governing knowledge: data, inspection and education policy in Europe’ Globalisation, Societies and Education
  • Ozga J (2011) Knowledge Stocks and Flows: Data and Education Governance in Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities (Eds) Tara Fenwick and Lesley Farrell, London Routledge
  • Ozga J (2011) Governing Narratives: ‘local’ meanings and globalising education policy Education Inquiry 2 (2) June pp 305-318
  • Ozga J (2011) ‘Knowledge Transfer and Transformation: moving knowledge from research to policy’  PERSPECTIVA, Florianópolis, v. 29, n. 1, 49-67, jan./jun. 2011
  • Ozga J (2011) Researching the Powerful: Seeking Knowledge about Policy European Educational Research Journal Volume 10 Number 2 2011 pp 218-224
  • Arnott, M.A. & Ozga, J. (2010) ‘Nationalism, Governance and Policy Making: The SNP in Power’ Public Money and Management, vol.30 no.2 pp.91-97
  • Arnott, M. and Ozga J. (2010) Education and Nationalism: the discourse of education policy in Scotland Discourse 31(3 ) 335-350
  • Grek S and Ozga J (2010) Governing Education through Data: Scotland, England and the European Education Policy Space British Education Research Journal 36 (6) 937-952
  • Grek, S. and Ozga, J. (2010) ‘Re-inventing Public Education: the new role of knowledge in education policy-making’, Public Policy and Administration 25 (3) 271-288
  • Ozga, J. (2009) Governing Education through Data in England: From Regulation to Self-Evaluation, Special Issue of Journal of Education Policy, 24(2) 149-163
  • Grek, S.,Lawn M, Lingard, B Ozga, J. Rinne, R., Segerholm, C.and Simola, H. (2009) ‘National policy brokering and the construction of the European Education Space in England, Sweden, Finland and Scotland’  Comparative Education 45(1) 5-22
  • Ozga J (2008) Governing Knowledge: research steering and research quality, European  Educational Research Journal, 7(3), pp.261-272.
  • Byrne D and Ozga J (2008) Education Research and Policy Research Papers in Education, 23(4), pp.377-407
  • Ozga, J (2007) Knowledge and Policy: Research and Knowledge Transfer Critical Studies in Education 48 (1) pp63-78
Recent book chapters
  • Ozga, Jenny (2020) Elites and Expertise: The Changing Material Production of Knowledge for Policy in Fan, Guorui and Popkewitz, Thomas (Eds.) Handbook of Education Policy Studies volume 1 Values, Governance, Globalization, and Methodology (https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9789811383465)
  • Ozga, J (2019) ‘Governing and Knowledge: Theorising the Relationship’ in Langer, R and Brusemeister, T Handbuch Educational Governance Theorien Springer
  • Ozga J (2017) ‘Education and Nationalism in Scotland: nationalism as a governing resource’ in Kantasalmi, K and Holm, G (eds) The State, Schooling and Identity Singapore, Palgrave Macmillan/Springer
  • Ozga, Jenny (2015) Working Knowledge: Data, Expertise and Inspection in the Governing of Education in Kotthoff H-G and Klerides, E (eds) Governing Educational Spaces Knowledge, Teaching, and Learning in Transition Rotterdam, Sense Publishers  pp 15-35 https://www.sensepublishers.com/media/2526-governing-educational-spaces.pdf
  • Ozga J and Dubois-Shaik F (2015) ‘Referencing Europe:usages  of Europe in National Identity Projects’ in Carter, C and Lawn, M (eds) Governing Europe’s Spaces: European Union Re-imagined Manchester, Manchester University Press
  • Ozga J and Segerholm C (2015) Neo-Liberal Agendas in Education in Grek, S and Lindgren, J (eds) Governing by Inspection Routledge pp27-38
  • Ozga J, Lawn M (2015) The History and Development of Inspectorates in England, Sweden and Scotland in Grek, S and Lindgren, J (eds) Governing by Inspection Routledge pp58-74
  • Lawn M and Ozga J (2012) Making Good Progress? Governing by Inspection: a post-comparative approach. Helsinki, Finnish Education Research Association.
  • Arnott M and Ozga J  (2012) ‘Education, Nationalism and Social Justice in Scott, G. & Mooney, G. (eds) Social Justice and Social Policy: the Politics of Social Policy in Scotland, Bristol, Policy Press
  • Ozga J (2012) ‘Trans-national Technologies and National Contexts: a Comparative Analysis of Education Policy in Scotland and England’ in Kauko, J Rinne R & Kynkäänniemi H (eds) Restructuring the Truth of Schooling – Essays on Discursive Practices in Sociology and the Politics of Education Helsinki, Finnish Educational Research Association
  • Arnott m and Ozga J (2010) ‘Education Policy & the SNP Government’ in Scott, G. & Mooney, G. (eds) (2010) Politics of Social Policy in Scotland, Policy Press

Ian is former President of BERA, 2013-2015. At OUDE he was Director of Professional Programmes and led the development of the Oxford Education Deanery.Before moving to Oxford, Ian was Professor of Teacher Education at the University of Glasgow. Prior to that he held posts at the University of the West of Scotland (Dean of Education and Media), London Metropolitan University (Head of School of Education), University of the West of England and the University of Gloucestershire.

Ian was President of the Scottish Educational Research Association from 2005–07 and chaired the Research and Development Committee of the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers from 2008-11. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts and is a Visiting Professor at Bath Spa University and Ulster University and an Honorary Professor at the University of Exeter. Since 2018 he has been a Senior Research Associate at Kazan Federal University, Russia.

Publications
Books
  • Menter, I., Muschamp, Y., Nicholls, P., Ozga, J. with Pollard, A. (1997) Work and Identity in the Primary School: A Post-Fordist Analysis Buckingham: Open University Press
  • Menter, I., Brisard, E. and Smith, I. (2006) Convergence or Divergence?: Initial teacher education in Scotland and England Edinburgh: Dunedin Academic Press.
  • Menter, I. and Murray, J. (eds.) (2011) Developing Research in Teacher Education, London: Routledge.
  • Menter, I., Elliot, D., Hulme, M., Lewin, J. and Lowden, K. (2011) A Guide to Practitioner Research in Education, London: Sage.
  • The Teacher Education Group (2015) Teacher Education in Times of Change. Bristol: Policy Press.
  • Peters, M., Cowie, B and Menter, I. (eds.) (2017) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education Research. Singapore: Springer.
  • Childs, A. and Menter, I. (eds.) (2018) Mobilising Teacher Researchers: challenging educational inequality. London: Routledge
  • Tatto, M.T. and Menter, I. (eds.) (2019) Knowledge, Policy and Practice in Teacher Education – A Cross-National Study. London: Bloomsbury.
Recent research reports
  • 2009 Final Report Curriculum for Excellence Draft Experiences and Outcomes: Collection, analysis and reporting of data for Learning and Teaching Scotland (Menter, I., Baumfield, V., Hulme, M., Devlin, A., Ellott, D., Hall, J., Hall, S. and Lowden, K.)
  • 2010 ‘Teachers: formation, training and identity’ (A literature review for Culture, Creativity and Education) (Menter, I.)
  • 2010 Literature Review on Teacher Education in the 21stCentury, Edinburgh: The Scottish Government. (Menter, I.,Hulme, M., Elliot, D. and Lewin, J.)
  • 2010 Research to support Schools of Ambition: Final Report, Edinburgh: The Scottish Government (Menter, I., Hulme, M., Christie, D., Payne, F., Coutts, N., Robson, D. and Spratt, J.)
  • 2011 Research to support Schools of Ambition: Final Report, Edinburgh: The Scottish Government (Menter, I., Hulme, M., Christie, D., Payne, F., Coutts, N., Robson, D. and Spratt, J.)
  • 2011 The Glasgow West Teacher Education Initiative: A Clinical Approach to Teacher Education. Evaluation Report. (Menter. I., Baumfield, V., Carroll, M., Dickson, B., Hulme, M., Lowden, K. and Mallon, W.) University of Glasgow.
  • 2012 The Glasgow West Teacher Education Initiative: Evaluation of second phase. Menter, I. and Lowden, K. Glasgow: The University of Glasgow.
  • 2013 Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools, funded by Citi Foundation (Aexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. and Menter, I.)
  • 2017 The role and contribution of higher education in contemporary teacher education. (Menter, I.) Commissioned by the Scottish Council of Deans of Education.
Recent book chapters
  • Menter, I. (2016) Teacher education – making connections with curriculum, pedagogy and assessment. In: Wyse, D., Hayward, L. and Pandya, J. (Eds.) The Sage Handbook of Curriculum, Pedagogy and Assessment. London: SAGE. pp 1015-1028.
  • Menter, I. (2016) ‘Foreword’ to Beckett, L. Teachers and Academic Partners in Urban Schools. London: Routledge.
  • Menter, I. and Walker, M. (2016) ‘School and society’ in Wyse, D. and Rogers, S. (Eds.) A Guide to Early Years and Primary Teaching. London: Sage.
  • Menter, I. (2016) Teacher education: generator of change or a mechanism for conformity? in Lees, H. and Noddings, N. (eds.) The Palgrave International Handbook of Alternative Education. London: Palgrave. 257-272.
  • Menter, I. (2017) ‘Reasons for education research’. In Wyse, D., Selwyn, N., Smith, E. and Suter, L. (Eds.) The BERA/SAGE Handbook of Educational Research. London: Sage. pp. 37-52.
  • Menter, I. (2017) ‘Diversity, development, devolution: the three Ds of UK teacher education and professional development in the twenty-first century’. In Florian, L. and Pantic, N. (Eds.) Teacher Education for the Changing Demographics of Schooling – Issues for research and practice. Cham, Switzerland: Springer. pp39-51.
  • Menter, I. (2017) ‘Teacher Education Research’ In Oxford Encyclopedia of Education. Oxford University Press. DOI: 10.1093/acrefore/9780190264093.013.275
  • Menter, I. (2018) ‘Teacher education in a crucible of change’ in Smith, L. and Wyatt, C. (Eds.) Innovation and Accountability in Teacher Education: Setting directions for new cultures in teacher education. Singapore: Springer. pp313-326.
  • Menter, I. and Reynolds, K. (2019) ‘Diversity in Teacher Education: Afterword’ In Sorensen, N. (Ed.) Diversity in Teacher Education. London: UCL IoE Books.
Recent journal articles
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. and Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: The Development of the Oxford Education Deanery Narrative. Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373.
  • Menter, I. (2015) Unity or disunity in the United Kingdom? Policy and practice in teacher education. Education and Self-Development. 2 (44),156-164.
  • Thompson, I., McNicholl, J. and Menter, I. (2016) Student teachers’ perceptions of poverty and educational achievement, Oxford Review of Education 42, 2, 214-229 DOI: 10.1080/03054985.2016.1164130
  • Menter, I. (2016) Helga Eng lecture 2015: What is a teacher in the 21st century and what does a 21st century teacher need to know? Acta Didactica Norge,10, 2, 11-25.
  • Lynch, D., Smith, R. and Menter, I. (2016) Reforming teacher education: from partnership to ‘syndication’. International Journal of Innovation, Creativity and Change. www.ijicc.net Volume 2, Issue 3.
  • Mutton, T., Burn, K. and Menter, I. (2017) Deconstructing the Carter Review: Competing conceptions of quality in England’s ‘school-led’ system of initial teacher education. Journal of Education Policy. 32, 1, 14-33. DOI: 10.1080/02680939.2016.1214751
  • Menter, I. (2017) Competences and Standards for Teachers and Teacher Education – Developments and Problems – a common approach for the United Kingdom? 26th Bulletin of the Japanese Society for the Study of Teacher Education. 8-19.
  • Menter, I., Valeeva, R. and Kalimullin, A. (2017) A tale of two countries – forty years on: politics and teacher education in Russia and England. European Journal of Teacher Education. 40, 5, 616-629.
  • Whiting, C., Whitty, G., Menter, I., Black, P., Hordern, J., Parfitt, A., Reynolds, K. and Sorenson, N. (2018) Diversity and Complexity: Becoming a teacher in England in 2015-16. Review of Education 6, 1, 69-96.
  • Menter, I. (2018) Defining teachers’ professional knowledge: the interaction of global and national influences. Education and Self-Development.13, 1, 32-42.
  • Loughran, J. and Menter, I. (2019) The essence of being a teacher educator and why it matters, Asia-Pacific Journal of Teacher Education, DOI:10.1080/1359866X.2019.1575946
Research and professional activity

Ian’s research interests are in teacher education and teachers’ work, with a particular interest in policy. He has carried out a number of ‘home international’ comparative studies within the UK, including ESRC-sponsored initiatives and has led projects commissioned by the Scottish Government and The National College for School Leadership. He led a research support team from OUDE working on the National College for Teaching and Leadership project, Closing the Gap – Test and Learn. He was also Director of the Oxford City Council funded Leadership for Learning project, working in city primary schools.

Ian is a founding editor of Review of Education, a journal of the British Educational Research Association, launched in 2013. He is series editor for Critical Guides for Teacher Educators, published by Critical Publishing. He is a founder member of two UK-wide research groups, TEG (Teacher Education Group) and CAPeR-UK (Curricululum, Assessment and Pedagogy Reform across the UK), as well as the OUDE –led research group on Poverty and Teacher Education. He was also a member of the steering group for the BERA-RSA Inquiry into Research and Teacher Education.

Ken Mayhew is Emeritus Professor of Education and Economic Performance and Emeritus Fellow of Pembroke College, Oxford.

He is an Extraordinary Professor at Maastricht University, a Director of the Centre for Tutorial Teaching and has recently finished a term as a member of the Department for Education’s Skills and Productivity Board. He was the founding Director of SKOPE, a multi-disciplinary centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, based in the Oxford Department of Education.
Ken is also currently a member of the ESRC’s College of Peer Reviewers; the Expert Group for CEDEFOP’s European Training and Learning Survey; the Expert Working Group for Cedefop’s Second European Skills and Jobs Survey; Bright Blue’s Commission on the Welfare System after the COVID 19 Pandemic. He is an editor of Oxford Economic Papers

Ken obtained a First in Modern History at Worcester College, Oxford and took a Masters in Economics at LSE. After graduate school he joined Her Majesty’s Treasury before moving to Oxford. In 1989 and 1990 he was Economic Director at the UK National Economic Development Office, and has worked as a consultant for many private and public sector organisations at home and abroad. In the UK these include the Department of Education and Skills, the Department of Trade and Industry, DEFRA, the Skills Funding Agency, the CIPD and the Confederation of British Industry. Abroad they include the EU, the Polish, Belgian and Omani Governments, SIK (Sweden) and Group Training Australia. He was on the Academic Advisory Board of the National Skills Taskforce and Chair of an expert group advising the OECD on the background questionnaire for PIAAC. His major research interests are in labour economics, human resource management and the economics of education and training. He has published widely in these areas.

Ken Mayhew would welcome informal contacts from prospective students interested in the following topics:

• The economics of education
• Transitions from the education system to the labour market
• Work-based training and learning
• Education and social mobility
• The labour market

Research

Ken’s current research is mainly in six areas: transitions from education into the labour market; the economics of work-based training; the economics of higher education; low paid work in the UK and Europe; the labour market as a social model; inequality with special emphasis on regional inequality.

Featured publications
  •  Oxford Handbook of Skills and Training, Oxford University Press, 2017 (with J. Buchanan, D. Finegold and C. Warhurst)
  • “Educating for a cooperative society –building human and social capital: the role of government” in G. Redding, A. Drew and S. Crump (eds), The Oxford Handbook of Higher Education Systems and University Management, 2019
  • “Inequality”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 2019 (with S. Wills)
  • Holmes, C, Mayhew, K (2016) “The economics of higher education”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 32(4) 475-496.
  • Mayhew, K, Holmes, C (2015) Over-qualification and skills mismatch in the graduate labour market. London: CIPD.
  • Mayhew, K (2015) “UK labour market policy then and now”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy.
  • “BREXIT and higher education” (2022) Oxford Review of Economic Policy
  • “What accounts for changes in the chances of being NEET in the UK?” (2021) Journal of Education and Work (with C. Holmes and E. Murphy)
  • Higher education and the labour market” (2020) Oxford Review of Education (with H. Lauder)
Books
  • Oxford Handbook of Skills and Training, Oxford University Press, paperback edition 2018 (with J. Buchanan, D. Finegold and C. Warhurst)
  • Oxford Handbook of Skills and Training, Oxford University Press, 2017 (with J. Buchanan, D. Finegold and C. Warhurst)
  • Appelbaum, E, Bosch, G, Gautié, J, Mason, G, Mayhew, K, Salverda, W, Schmitt, J, Westergaard-Nielsen, N (2010) Introduction and overview.
  • LLoyd, C, Mason, G, Mayhew, K (2008) Low-Wage Work in the United Kingdom. Russell Sage Foundation.
  • Grip, AD, Loo, JV, Mayhew, K (2002) The Economics of Skills Obsolescence Theoretical Innovations and Empirical Applications. Jai.
  • Mayhew, K, Fenn, P, McGuire, A (1994) Providing Health Care. Oxford: OUP.
  • Mayhew, K, Layard, R, Owen, G (1994) Britain’s Training Deficit. Avebury Publishing.
  • Bowen, A, Mayhew, K (1991) Reducing Regional Inequalities.
  • Fenn, P, McGuire, A, Mayhew, K (1991) Providing Health Care. Oxford: OUP.
  • Bowen, A, Mayhew, K (1990) Improving Incentives for the Low-Paid. Springer.
  • Mayhew, K (1983) Trade Unions and the Labour Market. Blackwell Pub.
  • Robinson, DJS, Mayhew, K (1983) Pay policies for the future.
Book chapters
  • “NEETS in England”, in M. Levels, C. Brzinsky-Fay, C. Holmes and J. Jongbloed (eds), The Dynamics of Marginalised Youth, Routledge, 2022 (with C. Holmes, L. Wright, E. Murphy, E. Keep and S. Maguire)
  • “Derek Robinson” in R. Cord (ed), The Palgrave Companion to Oxford Economics, Palgrave, 2021
  • “What, if anything, can we learn from Germany, Switzerland, Austria, the Netherlands and Denmark?”, in D. Goodhart (ed.), The Training We Need Now, Policy Exchange, 2020
  • “Educating for a cooperative society –building human and social capital: the role of government” in G. Redding, A. Drew and S. Crump (eds), The Oxford Handbook of Higher Education Systems and University Management, 2019
  • “The economic and social benefits of skills” in Oxford Handbook of Skills and Training, 2017 (with I Grugulis and C. Holmes)
  • “Skills and training: the landscape” in Oxford Handbook of Skills and Training, 2017 (with J. Buchanan, D. Finegold and C. Warhurst)
  • Mayhew, K, Wickham-Jones, M (2014) “The UK’s Social Model from New Deal to Economic Crisis”, In: J-E Dolvik, A Martin (eds.) European Social Models from Crisis to Crisis: Employment and Inequality in an Era of Monetary Integration.Oxford: OUP.
  • Holmes, C, Mayhew, K (2014) “The winners and losers in the ‘hourglass’ labour market”, In: Understanding Employer Engagement in Education: Theories and Evidence. 92-113
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.4324/9781315779966
  • Mayhew, K (2010) “Comment on Anderson and Ruhs”, In: B Anderson, M Ruhs (eds.) Who Needs Migrant Workers: Labour Shortages, Immigration and Public Policy.
  • Gautié, J, Westergaard-Nielsen, N, Schmitt, J, Mayhew, K (2010) “The impact of institutions on the supply side of the low-wage labor market”, In: Low-Wage Work in the Wealthy World. 147-182
  • Bosch, G, Mayhew, K, Gautié, J (2010) “Industrial relations, legal regulations, and wage setting”, In: Low-Wage Work in the Wealthy World. 91-146
  • Mayhew, K, Keep, E (2009) “Knowledge, skills and competitiveness”, In: F Rauner, R Maclean (eds.) Handbook of TVET Research.
  • Mayhew, K, Mason, G, Osborne, M, Stevens, P (2008) “Low pay, labour market institutions and job quality”, In: C Lloyd, G Mason, K Mayhew (eds.) Low Wage Work in the UK. New York: Russell Sage.
  • Mayhew, K, Mason, G (2008) “Low paid work in the UK: an overview”, In: C Lloyd, G Mason, K Mayhew (eds.) Low Wage Work in the UK. New York: Russell Sage.
  • Mayhew, K, Deer, C (2007) “The changing nature and context of higher education in the UK”, In: T Butler, M Dane (eds.) Reflections on Change.
  • Mayhew, K (2005) How to improve the human capital of older workers. Paris: OECD.
  • Mayhew, K, de Grip, A, van Loo, J (2002) “The economics of skills obsolescence”, In: A de Grip, J van Loo, K Mayhew (eds.) The Economics of Skills Obsolescence: Theoretical Innovations and Empirical Applications. Jai.
  • Mayhew, K (2002) “The high skills vision”, In: A Jolly (ed.) Skills and Training Directory. Kogan Page.
  • Mayhew, K (2002) “Higher education – size matters”, In: G Hayward, S James (eds.) Growing Higher Education: Expansion or Hyperinflation.
  • Mayhew, K, Holtham, G, Ingram, P (1998) “The long term unemployed – what more can be done?”, In:J McCormick, C Oppenheim (eds.) Welfare in Working Order. London: IPPR.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1998) “Vocational Education and Training and Economic Performance”, In: T Buxton, P Chapman, J Temple (eds.) Britain’s Economic Performance. 2nd edition. London: Routledge. 367-395
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1998) “Training and Development”, In: S Fox (ed.) The European business environment UK. London: Thomson Business Press. 219-241
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1996) “UK Training Policy – Assumptions and Reality”, In: A Booth, DJ Snower (eds.) Acquiring Skills Market Failures, Their Symptoms and Policy Responses. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 303-334
  • Mayhew, K, Ingram, P, Guest, D (1996) “How do we think about pay?”, In: H Murlis (ed.) Pay at the Crossroads. London: IPD.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1996) “Training for the Unemployed”, In: P Meadows (ed.) Work out – or Work in? Contributions to the debate on the future of work. York: Joseph Rowntree Foundation. 140-155
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1995) “The Economic Demand for Higher Education, and Investing in People – Two Aspects of Sustainable Development in British Higher Education”, In: F Coffield (ed.) Higher Education in a Learning Society. Durham: Durham University School of Education. 81-110
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1995) Training Policy for Competitiveness – Time for a Fresh Perspective? London: Policy Studies Institute. 110-145
  • Mayhew, K, Layard, R, Owen, G (1994) “Why we need a Training Reform Act”, In: K Mayhew, R Layard, G Owen (eds.) Britain’s Training Deficit. Avebury.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1994) “The Changing Structure of Training Provision”, In: T Buxton, P Chapman, P Temple (eds.) Britain’s Economic Performance. London: Routledge.
  • Mayhew, K, Anderton, R (1994) “A comparative analysis of the UK labour market”, In: R Barrell (ed.) The UK Labour Market: Comparative Aspects and Institutional Developments. Cambridge University Press.
  • Mayhew, K (1994) “Pay policies in the private sector: an international overview”, In: M Lavender (ed.) International Pay Policies. London: Public Finance Foundation.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1993) “Training and the Labour Market”, In: C Trinder, P Jackson (eds.) The Public Services Yearbook 1993. London: Chapman and Hall. 169-190
  • Mayhew, K (1992) “Incomes policy”, In: New Palgrave Dictionary of Money and Finance. Palgrave.
  • Mayhew, K (1991) “Pay policies in the private sector: an international overview”, In: J Hawkins (ed.) International Pay Policies. London: Public Finance Foundation.
  • Mayhew, K, McGuire, A, Fenn, P (1991) “The economics of health care”, In: K Mayhew, A McGuire, P Fenn (eds.) Providing Health Care. Oxford: OUP.
  • Mayhew, K, Bowen, A (1991) “Regional economic disparities: some public policy issues”, In: K Mayhew, A Bowen (eds.) Reducing Regional Inequalities.
  • Mayhew, K (1991) “Training: the way ahead”, In: Employment Institute (ed.) Improving Britain’s Industrial Performance. Employment Institute.
  • Mayhew, K (1991) “Regional issues in economics: setting the scene”, In: K Mayhew, A Bowen (eds.) Reducing Regional Inequalities.
  • Keep, EJ (1990) “Training for the Low Paid”, In: A Bowen, K Mayhew (eds.) Improving Incentives for the Low-Paid. London: Macmillan/NEDO. 139-180
  • Mayhew, K, Ray, A (1990) “White collar pay and employment”, In: M Gregory, A Thompson (eds.) A Portrait of Pay. OUP.
  • Mayhew, K, Bowen, A (1990) “Incentives for the low paid: issues for public policy”, In: K Mayhew, A Bowen (eds.) Improving Incentives for the Low Paid.
  • Mayhew, K, Bowen, A, Brewer, D (1990) “Incentives for the low paid: setting the scene”, In: K Mayhew, A Bowen (eds.) Improving Incentives for the Low Paid.
  • Mayhew, K, Turnbull, P (1989) “Models of union behaviour”, In: R Perlman, R Drago (eds.) Microeconomic Issues in the Labour Market. Harvester.
  • Mayhew, K (1986) “Economists and immigration”, In: A Dummett (ed.) Towards a Just Immigration Policy.
  • Mayhew, K (1986) “Employee behaviour”, In: D Morris (ed.) The Economic System in the UK. OUP.
  • Mayhew, K, Addison, J (1983) “Discrimination in the labour market”, In: G Bain (ed.) Industrial relations in Britain. Blackwell.
  • Mayhew, K (1983) “Traditional incomes policies”, In: D Robinson, K Mayhew (eds.) Pay Policies for the Future.
  • Mayhew, K, Greenhalgh, C (1981) “Labour supply in Great Britain: theory and evidence”, In: Z Hornstein, J Grice (eds.) The Economics of the Labour Market. HMSO.
  • Mayhew, K (1981) “Incomes policy and the private sector”, In: R Elliott, L Fallick (eds.) Incomes Policy, Inflation and Relative Pay. George Allen and Unwin.
  • Mayhew, K (1981) “The institutional context of incomes policy”, In: R Chater, A Dean, R Elliott (eds.) Incomes Policies. OUP.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K “Education and Training”, In: C Trinder, P Jackson (eds.) Public Services Yearbook 1994. London: Chapman and Hall. 237-254
Conference papers
Journal articles
  • “BREXIT and UK higher education”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 2022
  • “Kurzarbeit/short time working: experiences and lessons from the COVID-induced downturn”, National Institute Economic Review, 2022 (with B. Casey)
  • “What accounts for changes in the chances of being NEET in the UK?”, Journal of Education and Work, 2021 (with C. Holmes and E. Murphy)
  • “Regional inequalities: causes and cures”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 2021 (with F. Corvers)
  • “COVID 19 and the labour market”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 2020 (with P. Anand)
  • “Higher education and the labour market”, Oxford Review of Education, 2020 (with H. Lauder)
  • Inequality”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 2019 (with S. Wills)
  • Mayhew, K (2017) “UK higher education and Brexit”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 33(1) S155-S161.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grx012
  • Mayhew, K (2016) “Human Capital, Growth and Inequality”, Welsh Economic Review. 24(0) 23-23.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.18573/j.2016.10052
  • Holmes, C, Mayhew, K (2016) “The economics of higher education”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 32(4) 475-496.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grw031
  • Mayhew, K (2015) “Derek Robinson (9 February 1932-1 September 2014)”, ECONOMIC AND LABOUR RELATIONS REVIEW.26(3) 490-492.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/1035304615597839
  • Laczik, A, Mayhew, K (2015) “Labour market developments and their significance for VET in England: Current concerns and debates”, Research in Comparative and International Education. 10(4) 558-575.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/1745499915615974
  • Mayhew, K (2015) “UK labour market policy then and now”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 31(2) 199-216.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grv017
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K (2014) “Inequality – ‘wicked problems’, labour market outcomes and the search for silver bullets”, OXFORD REVIEW OF EDUCATION. 40(6) 764-781.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/03054985.2014.979580
  • Mayhew, K (2013) “Government and business: an introduction”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 29(2) 249-260.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grt028
  • Cobham, D, Adam, C, Mayhew, K (2013) “The economic record of the 1997-2010 Labour government: an assessment”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 29(1) 1-24.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grt014
  • Amable, B, Mayhew, K (2011) “Unemployment in the OECD”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 27(2) 207-220.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grr019
  • Lloyd, C, Mayhew, K (2010) “Skill: the solution to low wage work?”, Industrial Relations Journal. 41(5) 429-445.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2338.2010.00578.x
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K (2010) “Moving beyond skills as a social and economic panacea”, WORK EMPLOYMENT AND SOCIETY. 24(3) 565-577.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0950017010371663
  • Salverda, W, Mayhew, K (2009) “Capitalist economies and wage inequality”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 25(1) 126-154.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grp008
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K, Payne, J (2006) “From skills revolution to productivity miracle – Not as easy as it sounds?”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 22(4) 539-559.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grj032
  • Mayhew, K, Neely, A (2006) “Improving productivity – Opening the black box”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 22(4) 445-456.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grj026
  • Mayhew, K, Deer, C, Dua, M (2004) “The move to mass higher education in the UK: many questions and some answers”, OXFORD REVIEW OF EDUCATION. 30(1) 65-82.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/0305498042000190069
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K (2004) “The economic and distributional implications of current policies on higher education”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 20(2) 298-314.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grh017
  • Gold, M, Charlwood, A, Müller-Camen, M, Lucas, R, Crowley, S, Heery, E, Benson, J, Mayhew, K, Bach, S, Moore, S, Finkin, M, Rowlinson, M, Beauregard, A (2002) “Book Reviews”, British Journal of Industrial Relations. 40 341-368.
  • Mayhew, K (2002) “The state of working Britain”, BRITISH JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS. 40(2) 355-357.
    Borghans, L, Green, F, Mayhew, K (2001) “Skills measurement and economic analysis: An introduction”, OXFORD ECONOMIC PAPERS-NEW SERIES. 53(3) 375-384.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oep/53.3.375
  • Mayhew, K (2000) “The assessment: Labour markets and welfare”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 16(1) 1-12.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/16.1.1
  • Felstead, A, Green, F, Pack, A, Mayhew, K (2000) “The Impact of Training on Labour”, British Journal of Industrial Relations. 38(2)
  • Green, F, Felstead, A, Mayhew, K, Pack, A (2000) “The impact of training on labour mobility: Individual and firm-level evidence from Britain”, BRITISH JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS. 38(2) 261-275.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/1467-8543.00162
  • Felstead, A, Green, F, Mayhew, K (1999) “Britain’s training statistics: A cautionary tale”, WORK EMPLOYMENT AND SOCIETY. 13(1) 107-115.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1017/S0950017099000070
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K (1999) “The assessment: Knowledge, skills, and competitiveness”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 15(1) 1-15.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/15.1.1
  • Mayhem, K (1997) “The Education and Training Mismatch”, Business Strategy Review. 8(2) 51-53.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/1467-8616.00022
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K (1996) “Towards a learning society — Definition and measurement”, Policy Studies. 17(3) 215-232.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/01442879608423708
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K (1996) “Economic Demand for Higher Education? A Sound Foundation for Further Expansion?”, Higher Education Quarterly. 50(2) 89-109.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2273.1996.tb01693.x
  • MAYHEW, K, SEABRIGHT, P (1992) “INCENTIVES AND THE MANAGEMENT OF ENTERPRISES IN ECONOMIC TRANSITION: CAPITAL MARKETS ARE NOT ENOUGH”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy. 8(1) 105-129.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/8.1.105
  • HELM, D, MAYER, C, MAYHEW, K (1991) “THE ASSESSMENT – MICROECONOMIC POLICY IN THE 1980S”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 7(3) 1-12.
  • MAYHEW, K (1991) “THE ECONOMICS OF HUMAN – RESOURCE MANAGEMENT – MITCHELL, DJB, ZAIDI, MA”, BRITISH JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS. 29(3) 534-535.
  • MAYHEW, K (1991) “THE ASSESSMENT – THE UK LABOR-MARKET IN THE 1980S”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 7(1) 1-17.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/7.1.1
  • McGUIRE, A, FENN, P, MAYHEW, K (1989) “THE ASSESSMENT: THE ECONOMICS OF HEALTH CARE”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy. 5(1) 1-20.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/5.1.1
  • KEEP, E, MAYHEW, E (1988) “THE ASSESSMENT: EDUCATION, TRAINING AND ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy. 4(3) 1-1.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/4.3.1-a
  • KNIGHT, JB, MAYHEW, K (1987) “WAGE DETERMINATION AND LABOR-MARKET INFLEXIBILITY – INTRODUCTION”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 49(1) 1-8.
  • MAYHEW, K (1986) “WAGE RESTRAINT BY CONSENSUS – BRITAIN SEARCH FOR AN INCOMES-POLICY AGREEMENT 1965-79 – FISHBEIN, WH”, JOURNAL OF ECONOMIC LITERATURE. 24(2) 694-695.
  • Mayhew, K (1985) “Reforming the labour market”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy. 1(2) 60-79.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/1.2.60
  • MAYHEW, K (1985) “ECONOMICS OF UNEMPLOYMENT – AN HISTORICAL-PERSPECTIVE – CASSON, M”, INDUSTRIAL & LABOR RELATIONS REVIEW. 38(4) 667-668.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.2307/2524010
  • ROBINSON, D, MAYHEW, K (1983) “SPECIAL ISSUE – PAY POLICIES FOR THE FUTURE – INTRODUCTION”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 45(1) 3-13.
  • MAYHEW, K (1983) “FAIRNESS, COLLECTIVE-BARGAINING, AND INCOMES-POLICY – WILLMAN, P”, MANCHESTER SCHOOL OF ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL STUDIES. 51(1) 105-106.
  • MAYHEW, K (1983) “TRADITIONAL INCOMES POLICIES”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 45(1) 15-32.
    ROBINSON, D, MAYHEW, K (1983) “SPECIAL ISSUE – PAY POLICIES FOR THE FUTURE – CONCLUSIONS”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 45(1) 127-139.
  • MAYHEW, K, ROSEWELL, B (1981) “OCCUPATIONAL-MOBILITY IN BRITAIN”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 43(3) 225-255.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1981.mp43003001.x
  • MAYHEW, K, ROSEWELL, B (1979) “LABOR-MARKET SEGMENTATION IN BRITAIN”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 41(2) 81-115.
  • MAYHEW, K (1979) “ECONOMISTS AND STRIKES”,OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 41(1) 1-19.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1979.mp41001001.x
  • MAYHEW, K, ROSEWELL, B (1978) “IMMIGRANTS AND OCCUPATIONAL CROWDING IN GREAT-BRITAIN”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 40(3) 223-248.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1978.mp40003003.x
  • MAYHEW, K (1977) “DEGREE OF UNIONIZATION 1948-68 – COMMENT”, BULLETIN OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH. 29(1) 51-53.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8586.1977.tb00409.x
  • MAYHEW, K (1977) “EARNINGS DISPERSION IN LOCAL LABOR-MARKETS – IMPLICATIONS FOR SEARCH BEHAVIOR”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 39(2) 93-107.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1977.mp39002001.x
  • MAYHEW, K (1976) “REGIONAL VARIATIONS OF MANUAL EARNINGS IN ENGINEERING”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 38(1) 11-25.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1976.mp38001002.x
  • MAYHEW, K (1976) “PLANT SIZE AND EARNINGS OF MANUAL WORKERS IN ENGINEERING”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 38(3) 149-160.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1976.mp38003001.x
  • MAYHEW, K (1975) “REVERSAL OF SKILL DIFFERENTIALS UNDER PAYMENT BY RESULTS SYSTEMS CASE OF ENGINEERING”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 37(4) 251-267.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1975.mp37004001.x
  • Mayhew, K “The resurgence of incomes policy”, Manpower Policy and Practice.
  • Mayhew, K, Rijkers, B “Improving the human capital of older workers”, Ageing Horizons.
  • Mayhew, K, Felstead, A, Green, F “Interpreting training statistics in Europe: issuing a health warning”, European Journal for Vocational Training.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K “Towards the knowledge-driven economy”, 7(4) 50-59.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K “Was Ratner Right? Product Market and Competitive Strategies and Their Links with Skills and Knowledge”, EPI Economic Report. 12(3) 1-14.
  • Mayhew, K “The Assessment: Labour Markets and Welfare”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Vol. 16.(1)
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/16.1.1
Reports
  • Alternative Pathways into the Labour Market, CIPD, 2016 (with Craig Holmes)
  • Wilde, S, James, SF, Mayhew, K (2015) Training Managers: Benefits from and barriers to WorldSkills UK participation. Oxford: Oxford University Consulting.
  • Mayhew, K, Holmes, C (2015) Over-qualification and skills mismatch in the graduate labour market. London: CIPD.
  • James Relly, SF, Holmes, C, Mayhew, K (2015) Learning environments to develop vocational excellence. http://vocationalexcellence.education.ox.ac.uk/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/Project-2-Phase-2-Final-Report-Learning-environments-to-develop-vocational-excellence.pdf:
  • Chankseliani, M, James Relly, S, Mayhew, K (2015) WorldSkills competitors and entrepreneurship: A Report to the Skills Funding Agency.
  • Chankseliani, M, James Relly, Susan, Mayhew, Ken (2015) “Benefits of Developing Vocational Excellence. A Report to the National Apprenticeship Service of Project 3 (Phase II) of the DUVE suite of projects”, In: Benefits of Developing Vocational Excellence. A Report to the National Apprenticeship Service of Project 3 (Phase II) of the DUVE suite of projects.
  • James Relly, SF, Allen, J, Mayhew, K (2015) Further education college participation in worldSkills and other competitions. http://vocationalexcellence.education.ox.ac.uk/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/Project-4-Further-education-college-participation-in-WorldSkills-and-other-skills-competitions.pdf:
  • James Relly, SF, Rodriguez Leal, T, Mayhew, K (2014) Interim Evaluation Report on the Skills Competition CPD Programme. Oxford: Oxford University Consulting.
  • James Relly, SF, Rodriguez Leal, T, Mayhew, K (2014) Final Evaluation Report on the Skills Competition CPD Programme. Oxford: Oxford University Consulting.
  • James, SF, Mayhew, K, Laczik, A, Mordarska, M (2013) Report on Apprenticeships, Employer Engagement and Vocational Formation in England. Oxford: Oxford University Consulting.
  • James, SF, Mayhew, K, Chankseliani, M, Laczik, A (2013) “Benefits of Developing Vocational Excellence. A Report to the National Apprenticeship Service. Oxford: SKOPE”, In: Benefits of Developing Vocational Excellence A Report to the National Apprenticeship Service of Project 3 of the DUVE suite of projects.
  • James, S, Holmes, C, Mayhew, K (2013) “Learning Environments to Develop vocational Excellence. Oxford: SKOPE”, In: A Report to the National Apprenticeship Service of Project 2 of the DUVE suite of projects. Oxford: SKOPE.
  • Mayhew, K, Holmes, C (2012) Is the UK labour market polarising. London: Resolution Foundation.
  • Holmes, C, Mayhew, K, Keep, EJ (2012) “Ten Big Questions for Higher Education”, In: SKOPE Issues Paper. Cardiff: Cardiff University, SKOPE.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (2011) “Future Directions for Skills Policy”, In: SKOPE submission to the Labour Party Policy Review on skills (mimeo). Universities of Oxford and Cardiff, SKOPE.
  • Mayhew, K, Green, F, Stasz, C (2005) Defining a strategy for the direct assessment of adult skills. Copenhagen:Danish Technological Institute.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (2004) Can Employers Be Persuaded That Training Pays? Glasgow: Future Skills Scotland/ScottishEnterprise.
  • Mayhew, K, Wilson, R, Hogarth, T, Keep, E (2003) Tackling the low skills equilibrium. London: Department of Trade and Industry.
  • Mayhew, K, Green, F, Molloy, E (2003) Employer Perspectives on Skill. London: Department for Education and Skills.
  • Mayhew, K, Keep, E, Bosworth, D (2003) Tackling the low skills equilibrium: a review of the issues. Department of Trade and Industry.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K, Corney, M (2002) Review of the evidence on the rate of return to employers of investment in training and employer training measures. Department of Trade and Industry.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (2001) “Globalisation, Models of Competitive Advantage and Skills”, In: SKOPE Research Paper. Coventry: University of Warwick, SKOPE.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (2000) “The Leisure Sector”, In: National Skills Task Force Research Project Report. Sheffield: DfEE.
  • Mayhew, K, Felstead, A, Green, F (1997) Getting the measure of training. Leeds: Centre for Industrial Policy and Performance, Leeds University.
  • Mayhew, K, Holtham, G (1996) Tackling long term unemployment. London: Institute for Public Policy Research.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1994) “UK Training Policy – Assumptions and Reality”, In: Background briefing paper for TUC national conference ‘Looking Forward to Full Employment’. London: TUC.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1994) Scoping paper for the Institute of Personnel Management ‘What Makes Training Pay?’ Project. London: IPM.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1993) Submission on training and skills utilisation to the House of Commons Select Committee on Trade and Industry’s inquiry into the competitiveness of British manufacturing’, June, 1993. (subsequently published in Evidence to the House of Commons Select Committee on Trade and Industry, Trade and Industry Committee 2nd Report ‘Competitiveness of UK Manufacturing Industry’, Vol 2, Memoranda of Evidence. London: HMSO.
  • Layard, R, Mayhew, K, Owen, G (1993) The Training Reform Act of 1994.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1108/01437729310033296
  • Mayhew, K, St John, B (1989) Subcontracting in Britain. London: Confederation of British Industry.
  • Mayhew, K, Rosewell, B (1981) Manpower problems and changes in the labour market. Bradford: MCB Publications.
  • Mayhew, K, Rosewell, B (1980) Employment and Unemployment Issues in the 1970s.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1108/eb001235
  • Mayhew, K, Lall, S (1973) The income and balance of payments effects of private foreign investment in manufacturing: case studies of Colombia and Malaysia. UNCTAD.
Other
  • “BREXIT and UK higher education”, Realites Industrielles, Feb 2021
  • Skills and Skills Mismatch in Food and Drink Manufacturing, a Report for DEFRA, 2020 (with Craig Holmes)
  • “Career choice and a policy dilemma”, CEDEFOP’S Skill Set and Match, November 2018
  • Oman: National Workforce Planning, SKOPE, 2016
  • Mayhew, K (2015) “Derek Robinson”, Royal Economic Society Newsletter.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1999) “Demand and supply”, People Management. 40-42.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1998) “Was Ratner Right”, T-Magazine. 15-17.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1998) “Welfare to Work – some questions ministers must answer”, Parliamentary Brief. 5(3) 18-19.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1996) “What Training Can and Cannot Do for the Jobless”, Parliamentary Brief. 4(4) 43-46.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1994) “Skilling the Jobless: Time for a New Deal”, Employment Policy Institute Economic Report. 8(1) 1-5.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1994) “Skills Cannot Promise a Job”, Parliamentary Brief .3(2) 17-20.

Herb completed a BA (Hons) Psychology at Indiana University in 1968. After that, he achieved an MA at Indiana before moving to UCLA to complete a DPhil in Psychology in 1974.

Shortly after, he was appointed Head of Evaluation Research Services at University of Southern California for 5 years, before moving to Sydney, Australia in 1980 to take a position as Lecturer, and then Senior Lecturer, at Sydney University.

At the same time, he was a Reader in Education. He held these posts until 1990, when he joined the University of Western Sydney. Over the next 15 years at that institution, he served a number of roles, including Research Professor of Education, Professor of Psychology, Dean of Graduate Research Studies, Pro-Vice Chancellor of Research, and Director of Self-concept Enhancement and Learning Facilitation (SELF) Research Centre. Indeed, in 1997 he founded the SELF Research Centre, which now has over 450 members, including many of the top self-concept researchers in the world, and satellite centres at leading Universities in Australia, Europe, North America, and Asia (see http://self.uws.edu.au/). He served as Director of SELF until he departed at the start of 2006 to become a Professor at the University of Oxford.

Herb has supervised scores of Honours-level and Doctoral candidates. Some of his recent PhD supervisions have been in the areas of self-concept theory and intervention, motivation, scale development, bullying, mental toughness in elite athletes, the peer review process, and eating disorders, among others. They generally employ complex quantitative research techniques

Research

Herb Marsh is widely published with 350 articles in more than 70 different journals, 60 chapters, 14 monographs, and 350 conference papers; and co-edits the International Advances in Self Research monograph series. In the most important journals in his disciplines over the last quarter century he is the most frequently published author in American Educational Research Journal (29 articles) and the Journal of Sport & Exercise Psych (21 articles), and second most frequently published author in Journal of Educational Psychology (61 articles). He has a total of 276 journal articles listed in ISI that have been cited a total of more than 11,00 times – including 55 articles with at least 55 citations (ISI H index = 55) and one article with more than 1,100 citations.

He has been recognized as the most productive educational psychologist in the world, as one of the top 10 international researchers in Higher Education and in Social Psychology, and the 11th most productive researcher in the world across all disciplines of psychology. He is a highly cited researcher on ISI’s list of the “world’s most cited and influential scientific authors over a sustained period according to a common standard that covers all countries and all scientific disciplines” (http://isihighlycited.com/), one of only a few UK social science researchers to achieve this recognition and one of the few anywhere to achieve this distinction in two different categories (general social sciences and psychology/psychiatry; presently there is no classification for education).

He has reviewed articles for more than 75 journals and has been on the editorial boards of 14 international journals (J. Ed Psych; Am Ed Res J; Child Devel; Perspectives on Psych Sci; J Pers & Soc Psych; Structural Equation Modelling; Inter J of Sport Psych; Ed & Psych Measurement; J Exp Educ; Educ Res and Eval; J Sport & Exercise Psych; Int J of Sport & Exercise Psych; J of Contemporary Ed Psych; Organizational Res Methods; Multivariate Behavioral Res).

He has served on external advisory committees for the: Scientific Advisory Board of the German Max Planck Institute (Education and Human Development, Berlin); Hong Kong Institute of Educational Research, Chinese University of Hong Kong; Social Sciences and Humanities for the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zürich (Zürich ETH); and the International Research School “The Life Course: Evolutionary and Ontogenetic Dynamics” co-organised by the Univ of Michigan (USA), Univ of Virginia (USA), Humboldt University (Germany), Free University (Germany) and the Max Planck Institute.

Professor Marsh’s research has consistently attracted external funding, including a 100% success record on 24 proposals to the highly competitive Australian Research Council during the last 25 years as well as more recent United Kingdom grants from the Economic and Social Research Council, Higher Education Funding Council for England, and Higher Education Authority.

Other international awards include a Career Achievement Award from the American Educational Research Association, the prestigious Wen Lin Visiting Professorship from The Chinese University of Hong Kong, a visiting travelling fellowship from the British Psychological Society, Fellow of the Australian Academy of Social Sciences and the Society of Multivariate Experimental Psychology, and many keynote presentations at international conferences including the presidential invited keynote addresses for 2007 meetings of both the British Educational Research Association and the American Educational Research Association. In 2008 Professor Marsh was awarded the ESRC Professorial Fellowship which provides professorial salary, support staff and infrastructure for an extended research programme, a highly competitive fellowship awarded to only 3-5 social science researchers across all of the UK.

Major research/scholarly interests

Self-concept and Motivational constructs: Theory, Measurement, Research, Enhancement; Teaching Effectiveness and Its Evaluation: Theory, measurement, research, and enhancement; Higher Education with a particular emphasis on students’ evaluation of teaching and relations between teaching and research; Developmental Psychology; Quantitative analysis, particularly confirmatory factor analysis, structural equation modelling, multilevel modelling; Sports psychology with a particular focus on physical self-concept and motivation; health psychology with a focus on motivational aspects of health related physical activity, physical fitness, and eating disorders; The peer review process in relation to both journals and research grants; Peer support and anti-bullying interventions.

Recent publications (2008 and in press)
Journal articles
  • Cowin, L.S. Johnson, M., Craven, R.G., & Marsh, H.W. (2008) Causal modeling of self-concept, job satisfaction, and retention of nurses International Journal Of Nursing Studies 45, 1449-1459
  • Craven, R. & Marsh, H. W. (2008). The centrality of the self-concept construct for psychological wellbeing and unlocking human potential: Implications for child and educational psychologists Educational & Child Psychology 25, 104-118.
  • Guay, F., Marsh, H. W., Senécal, C. , Dowson, M. (2008). Representations of relatedness with parents and friends and autonomous academic motivation during the late adolescence-early adulthood period: Reciprocal or unidirectional effects? British Journal of Educational Psychology, 78, 621–637
  • Ginns, P., Marsh, H. W., Behnia, M., Cheng, J. H. & Scalas, F. (in press). Using postgraduate students’ evaluations of research experience to benchmark departments and faculties: Issues and challenges British Journal of Educational Psychology
  • Fernet, C., Senécal, C., Guay, F., Marsh, H., & Dowson, M. (2008). The Work Tasks Motivation Scale for Teachers (WTMST) Journal of Career Assessment 16(2), 256-279.
  • Lüdtke, O., Marsh, H. W., Robitzsch, A., Trautwein, U., Asparouhov, T., & Muthén, B. (2008). The multilevel latent covariate model: A new, more reliable approach to group-level effects in contextual studies Psychological Methods 13, 203-229.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2008). The elusive importance effect: More failure for the Jamesian perspective on the importance of importance in shaping self-esteem Journal of Personality 76, 1081-1121.
  • Marsh, H. W., Jayasinghe, U. W., & Bond, N. W. (2008). Improving the peer-review process for grant applications: Reliability, validity and generalization American Psychologist 63, 160-168.
  • Marsh; H., Ludtke, O., Robitzsch, A., Trautwein, U. Latent (in press). Profile Analysis of Academic Self-concept Dimensions: Synergy of Person- and Variable-centered Approaches to the Internal/External Frame of Reference Models Structural Equation Modeling
  • Marsh, H. W., Martin, A. J., & Cheng, J. H. S. (2008). A multilevel perspective on gender in classroom motivation and climate: Potential benefits of male teachers for boys? Journal of Educational Psychology 100, 78-95.
  • Marsh, H. W., & O’Mara, A. (2008). Reciprocal effects between academic self-concept, self-esteem, achievement and attainment over seven adolescent years: Unidimensional and multidimensional perspectives of self-concept  Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin 34, 542-552.
  • Marsh, H. W., O’Mara, A. J. & Malmberg, L. (2008). Meta-Analysis: A three-level multilevel meta-anlaysis.
  • Marsh, H. W., Seaton, M., Trautwein, U., Lüdtke, O., Hau, K. T., O’Mara, A. J., & Craven, R. G. (2008). The big-fish-little-pond-effect stands up to critical scrutiny: Implications for theory, methodology, and future research Educational Psychology Review 20, 319-350.
  • Marsh, H. W., Trautwein, U., Ludtke, O. & Köller, O. (2008). Social comparison and big-fish-little-pond effects on self-concept and other self-belief constructs: Role of generalized and specific others Journal of Educational Psychology 100, 510-524.
  • Martin, A. J., & Marsh, H. W. (2008). Academic buoyancy: Towards an understanding of students’ everyday academic resilience Journal of School Psychology 46, 53-83.
  • Martin, A.J., & Marsh, H.W. (in press). Academic resilience and academic buoyancy: an encompassing multidimensional and hierarchical framing of concepts, causes, correlates, and cognate constructs Oxford Review of Education.
  • Martin, A.J., & Marsh, H.W. (2008). Workplace and academic buoyancy: Psychometric assessment and construct validity amongst school personnel and students Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment 26, 168-184.
  • Martin, A.J., Marsh, H.W., Debus, R. L. & Malmberg L. E. (2008). Performance and mastery orientation of high school and university/college students – A Rasch perspective Educational And Psychological Measurement 68, 464-487.
  • Scalas, L. F. & Marsh, H. W. (in press). The Role of Actual-Ideal Discrepancy in Explaining the Relation Between Physical Appearance and Self-Concept: A Stronger Methodological Approach European Journal of Personality.
  • Seaton, M., Marsh; H., & Craven, R. G. (in press). Earning Its Place as a Pan-Human Theory: Universality of the Big-Fish-Little-Pond Effect (BFLPE) Across 41 Culturally and Economically Diverse Countries Journal of Educational Psycholoygy.
  • Seaton, M., Marsh; H. W., Dumas; F., Huguet, P., Monteil, J. M, Regner, I., Blanton, H., Buunk, A. P., Gibbons, F. X. Kuyper, H., Suls, J. & Wheeler, L. (2008). In search of the big fish: Investigating the coexistance of the big-fish-little-pond effect with the positive effects of upward comparison British Journal of Social Psychology 47, 73-103.
  • Wen, Z., Marsh, H.W.,  Kit-Tai, H. & (in press). Structural Equation Models of Latent Interactions: An Appropriate Standardized Solution and Its Scale-free Properties Structural Equation Modeling
Edited books and chapters
  • Marsh, H. W., Craven, R. G., & McInerney, D. (Eds.). (2008). Self-Processes, Learning, and Enabling Human Potential: Dynamic New Approaches. International Advances in Self Research. Volume 3. Information Age Press: Greenwich, CT.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2007). Application of confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling in sport and exercise psychology. In G. Tenenbaum & R. C. Eklund. (Eds), Handbook of sport psychology (3rd Ed.). (pp. 774-798). Hoboken, NJ, US: John Wiley & Sons Inc.
  • Marsh, H. W. (In press). A multidimensional, hierarchical model of self-concept: An important facet of personality. In G. J. Boyle (ed.). Handbook of Personality. Sage: London.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2007). Physical Self-Concept and Sport. In S. Jowette & D. Lavallee, David (Eds), Social Psychology in Sport. (pp. 159-179). Champaign, IL, US: Human Kinetics.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2007). Students’ evaluations of university teaching: A multidimensional perspective. In R. P. Perry & J C. Smart (Eds.), The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: An Evidence-Based Perspective (pp.319-384).  New York: Springer.
  • Marsh, H.W., Cheng, J.,  Middleton, C. J. (in press). The Physical Self: Exploring Measurement and Constructs Surrounding Physical Self-Concept
  • Marsh, H.W., Martin, A. J. & Cheng, J. (2008). How we judge ourselves from different perspectives: Contextual influences on self-concept formation. In M. L. Maehr, S. Karabenick & T. Urdan (Eds.). Advances in Motivation and Achievement (Volume 15). New York: Elsevier.
  • Marsh, H.W., & O’Mara, A. J. (2008). Self-concept is as multidisciplinary as it is multidimensional: A review of theory, measurement, and practice in self-concept research. In H. W. Marsh, R. G. Craven, & D. M. McInerney (Eds.). Self-Processes, Learning, and Enabling Human Potential: Dynamic New Approaches. (Volume 3, pp. 87-118). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing
  • Marsh, H.W., & Retali, K. (in press). Academic self-concept. K. Littleton, C. Wood, J. K. Staarman (Eds.). Elsevier Handbook of Educational Psychology: New Perspectives on Learning and Teaching. New York: Elsevier
  • Marsh, H.W., Scalas L.F. (in press). Self-concept and learning: Reciprocal effects model between academic self-concept and academic achievement. To appear in B. McGaw, E. Baker, P. P. Peterson (Eds.) International Encyclopedia of Education, 3rd edition. Elsevier.
  • McInerney, D. M., Marsh, H.W., & Craven, R. G., & (2008). Self-Processes, Learning, and Enabling Human Potential. In H. W. Marsh, R. G. Craven, & D. M. McInerney (Eds.). Self-Processes, Learning, and Enabling Human Potential: Dynamic New Approaches. (Volume 3, pp. 3-12). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.
  • Parada, R., Craven, R. G., & Marsh, H.W. (2008). The beyond bullying secondary program: An innovative program empowering teachers to counteract bullying in schools. Self-Processes, Learning, and Enabling Human Potential: Dynamic New Approaches. (Volume 3, pp. 373-426). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.
  • Seaton, M., Craven, R. G., &  Marsh, H.W. (2008). East Meets West: Investigating the Generalizability of the Big-Fish-Little-Pond Effect in Western and Non-Western Countries. In H. W. Marsh, R. G. Craven, & D. M. McInerney (Eds.). Self-Processes, Learning, and Enabling Human Potential: Dynamic New Approaches. (Volume 3, pp. 353-372). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.
Most important publications (prior to 2008)
  • Marsh, H. W. (2007). Students’ evaluations of university teaching: A multidimensional perspective. In R. P. Perry & J C. Smart (Ed.), The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: An Evidence-Based Perspective (pp.319-384).  New York: Springer.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2007).Self-concept theory, measurement and research into practice: The role of self-concept in educational psychology. Leicester, UK: British Psychological Society.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2007). Application of confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling in sport/exercise psychology. In G. Tenenbaum & R. C. Eklund (Eds.), Handbook of on sport psychology (3rd ed., pp. 774 – 798). New York: Wiley.
  • Marsh, H. W., & Hau, K-T. (2007). Applications of latent-variable models in educational psychology: The need for methodological-substantive synergies. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 32, 151-171.
  • Marsh, H. W., Hau, K-T., Artelt, C., Baumert, J., Peschar, J. L. (2006). OECD’s brief self-report measure of educational psychology’s most useful affective constructs: Cross-cultural, psychometric comparisons across 25 countries. International Journal of Testing. 6, 311–360.  (special issue of journal).
  • Marsh, H. W. & Craven, R. G. (2006). Reciprocal effects of self-concept and performance from a multidimensional perspective: Beyond seductive pleasure and unidimensional perspectives. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 1, 133-163.
  • Marsh, H. W., Martin, A. J., & Hau, K-T. (2006). A Multiple Method Perspective on Self-concept Research in Educational Psychology: A Construct Validity Approach. In M. Eid & E. Diener (Eds.), Handbook of Multimethod Measurement in Psychology (pp. 441-456). American Psychological Association: Washington DC.
  • Marsh, H.W., Papaioannou, A., Theodorakis, Y. (2006). Causal ordering of physical self-concept and exercise behavior: Reciprocal effects model and the influence of physical education teachers. Health Psychology, 25 (3): 316-328
  • Marsh, H. W., Trautwein, U., Lüdtke, O., Köller, O. & Baumert, J. (2006) Integration of multidimensional self-concept and core personality constructs: Construct validation and relations to well-being and achievement. Journal of Personality, 74, 403-455.
  • Marsh, H. W., Ellis, L., Parada, L., Richards, G. & Heubeck, B. G. (2005). A short version of the Self Description Questionnaire II: Operationalizing criteria for short-form evaluation with new applications of confirmatory factor analyses. Psychological Assessment, 17, 81-102.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2005). Big fish little pond effect on academic self-concept. German Journal of Educational Psychology, 19, 119-128.
  • Marsh, H. W. & Kleitman, S. (2005). Consequences of employment during high school: Character building, subversion of academic goals, or a threshold. American Educational Research Journal, 42, 331-369.
  • Marsh, H. W., Debus, R. & Bornholt, L. (2005). Validating Young Children’s Self-concept Responses: Methodological Ways and means to understand their responses. In D. M. Teti (Ed.), Handbook of Research Methods in Developmental Science (pp. 138-160). Blackwell Publishers: Oxford, UK.
  • Marsh, H. W., Hau, K-T & Grayson, D. (2005). Goodness of Fit Evaluation in Structural Equation Modeling. In A. Maydeu-Olivares & J. McArdle (Eds.), Contemporary Psychometrics. A Festschrift for Roderick P. McDonald (pp. 275-340). Mahwah NJ: Erlbaum.
  • Marsh, H. W., & Perry, C. (2005). Does a positive self-concept contribute to winning gold medals in elite swimming? The causal ordering of elite athlete self-concept and championship performances. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 27, 71-91.
  • Marsh, H. W., Trautwein, U., Lüdtke, O., Köller, O. & Baumert, J. (2005) Academic self-concept, interest, grades and standardized test scores: Reciprocal effects models of causal ordering. Child Development, 76, 297-416.
  • Marsh, H. W. & Hau, K. T. (2004). Explaining paradoxical relations between academic self-concepts and achievements: Cross-cultural generalizability of the internal-external frame of reference predictions across 26 countries. Journal of Educational Psychology, 96,  56-67
  • Marsh, H.W., Hau, K.T. & Wen, Z., (2004).  In search of golden rules: Comment on hypothesis testing approaches to setting cutoff values for fit indexes and dangers in overgeneralising Hu & Bentler’s (1999) findings. Structural Equation Modelling, 11, 320-341.
  • Marsh, H. W.; Wen, Z.; Hau, K. (2004). Structural equation models of latent interactions: Evaluation of alternative estimation strategies and indicator construction. Psychological Methods, 9, 275-300.
  • Marsh, H. W. & Hau, K. T. (2003). Big fish little pond effect on academic self-concept: A crosscultural (26 country) test of the negative effects of academically selective schools. American Psychologist, 58, 364-376.
  • Guay, F., Marsh, H. W. & Boivin, M. (2003). Academic self-concept and academic achievement: Development perspectives on their causal ordering. Journal of Educational Psychology, 95, 124-136.
  • Marsh, H. W., Hau, K-T, & Kong, C-K, (2002). Multilevel Modeling of Longitudinal Growth and Change: Substantive Effects or Regression Toward the Mean Artifacts? Multivariate Behavioral Research, 37, 245-282.
  • Jayasinghe, U. W., Marsh, H. W. & Bond, N. (2002). A Multilevel Cross-classified Modelling Approach to Peer Review of Grant Proposals: The Effects of Assessor and Researcher Attributes on Assessor Ratings. Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A-Statistics in Society, 166, 279-300.
  • Marsh, H. W., Ellis, L., & Craven, R. G. (2002). How do preschool children feel about themselves? Unravelling measurement and multidimensional self-concept structure. Developmental Psychology, 38, 376-393.
  • Marsh, H. W. & Hattie, J. (2002). The relationship between research productivity and teaching effectiveness: Complimentary, antagonistic or independent constructs. Journal of Higher Education, 73, 603-642.
  • Marsh, H. W. & Kleitman, S. (2002). Extracurricular school activities: The good, the bad, and the nonlinear. Harvard Educational Review, 72, 464-502.
  • Marsh, H. W., Rowe, K., Martin, A. (2002). PhD students’ evaluations of research supervision: Issues, complexities and challenges in a nationwide Australian experiment in benchmarking universities. Journal of Higher Education, 73 (3), 313-348.
  • Marsh, H. W., Koeller, O., & Baumert, J. (2001). Reunification of East and West German school systems: Longitudinal multilevel modeling study of the big fish little pond effect on academic self-concept. American Educational Research Journal, 38 (2), 321-350.
  • Marsh, H. W., Parada, R. H., Yeung, A. S. & Healey, J. (2001). Aggressive School Troublemakers and Victims:A Longitudinal Model Examining the Pivotal Role of Self-concept. Journal of Educational Psychology, 93(2), 411-419.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2001). Distinguishing between good (useful) and bad workload on students’ evaluations of teaching. American Educational Research Journal, 38 (1), 183-212.
  • Marsh, H. W., Hau, K-T, & Kong, C-K, (2000). Late Immersion and Language of Instruction (English vs. Chinese) in Hong Kong High Schools: Achievement Growth in Language and Nonlanguage Subjects. Harvard Educational Review 70, 302-346.
  • Marsh, H. W., Kong, C-K, Hau, K-T (2000).  Longitudinal Multilevel Modeling of the Big Fish Little Pond Effect on Academic Self-concept:  Counterbalancing Social Comparison and Reflected Glory Effects in Hong Kong High Schools. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 78,  337-349.
  • Marsh, H. W., & Roche, L. A. (2000). Effects of grading leniency and low workloads on students’ evaluations of teaching: Popular myth, bias, validity or innocent bystanders? Journal of Educational Psychology, 92,:202-228.
  • Marsh, H. W., Craven, R. G., & Debus, R. (1998). Structure, stability, and development of young children’s self-concepts: A multicohort-multioccasion study. Child Development, 69(4), 1030-1053.
  • Marsh, H. W., Hau, K-T., Balla, J R., & Grayson, D. (1998) Is more ever too much? The number of indicators per factor in confirmatory factor analysis. Multivariate Behavioral Research, 33, 181-220.
  • Marsh, H. W., & Roche, L. A (1997). Making students’ evaluations of teaching effectiveness effective. American Psychologist, 52, 1187-1197.
  • Marsh, H. W. (1997). The measurement of physical self-concept: A construct validation approach. In K. Fox (Ed.), The physical self-: From motivation to well-being (pp. 27-58). Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.
  • Marsh, H. W.,  & Craven, R. (1997). Academic self-concept: Beyond the dustbowl. In G. Phye (Ed.), Handbook of classroom assessment: Learning, achievement, and adjustment (pp. 131-198). Orlando, FL : Academic Press.

Ingrid Lunt is a psychologist by background, and joined the Oxford Department of Education in 2005, having previously worked for 20 years at the Institute of Education, University of London.

She was Director of Graduate Studies for 5 years, and the first Director of the new ESRC Doctoral Training Centre (DTC) in the Social Sciences.

She has been President of the British Psychological Society (1998-1999), President of the European Federation of Psychologists Associations (1993-1999), and Vice President of the International Union of Psychological Science (2004-2008).

She has carried out research in the field of special educational needs and inclusive education, and more recently in the area of higher education, in particular higher professional education, and doctoral education. For the past 20 years she has been leading a project, initially funded by the European Union, which has been developing a common qualifications framework for psychologists across Europe.

Research

Ingrid’s research interests include higher professional learning, doctoral education, comparative higher education policy in European countries.

Publications

Selected publications include:

  • Scott D., Brown A., Lunt I., Thorne L. (2004) Professional Doctorates: Integrating professional and academic knowledge. Open University Press and SRHE
  • Klenowski V. and Lunt I. (2008) Enhancing Learning at Doctoral Level through the use of reflection? Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education 33, 2, 203-217.
  • Lunt I. (2008) Psychologist qualifications in Europe: Common standards for quality and mobility. Australian Psychologist 43, 4, 222-230
  • Lunt I. (2008) Beyond tuition fees? The legacy of Blair’s government to higher education. Oxford Review of Education 34, 6, 741-752
  • Edwards A., Lunt I., Stamou E. (2010) Inter-professional work and expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools. British Educational Research Journal 36, 1, 27-45
  • Lunt I. (2011) EuroPsy: the development of standards and competence of psychologists. European Psychologist 16, 2, 104-111
  • Lunt I. and Peiro J. M. (2012) The Bologna Process, education and assessment in psychology. In Ed. D. Dunn, S.C Baker, C.M Mehrota, R.E. Landrum, M.M McCarthy Assessing teaching and learning in psychology: current and future perspectives. Wadsworth Publishing, Belmont CA.
  • Lunt I., McAlpine L., Mills D. (2014) Lively bureaucracy: the ESRC’s Doctoral Training Centres and UK universities. Oxford Review of Education 40, 2, 151-170
  • Lunt I. (2014) International frameworks for psychology education and training: a European perspective. In R. Silbereisen, P. Ritchie, J. Panday (eds.) Psychology Education and Training : a global perspective. Hove: Psychology Press
  • Clarke, G. and Lunt, I. (2014) The concept of ‘originality’ in the PhD: how is it interpreted by examiners? Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, 39 (7), 803-820.
  • Lunt I., Peiró J.M., Poortinga Y.H., Roe R.A. (2015) EuroPsy: Standards and Quality in Education for Professional Psychologists. Göttingen: Hogrefe Pub.

Anne joined the Department in 2005 having held Chairs at the Universities of Leeds and Birmingham. She was Director of the Department for three years (January 2010 to December 2012) and when not in that post, she was its Director of Research. She became Professor Emerita in October 2014.

Anne is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, and of the Learned Society of Wales and is a former President of the British Educational Research Association. She is a Fellow of St Hilda’s College and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Oslo from 2007 to 2016 and has been awarded Doctorates honoris causa by the Universities of Helsinki and Oslo and in 2022 she received a lifetime’s achievement award from the American Educational Research Association’s Cultural-Historical SIG.

She was a member of the ESRC’s Research Grants Board between 2003 and 2007 and a member of the Education sub-panel in the 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise. She is co-founder of OSAT (the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research), is a founding editor of Learning Culture and Social Interaction. She is a member of the UK Cabinet Office’s Research Evidence Impact Panel (REIP), sits on several research advisory boards internationally, undertakes research evaluations for research councils worldwide and continues to be involved in institutional reviews.

Research

Anne’s research draws on cultural-historical approaches to learning. She focuses on professional learning and, in particular, the relational turn in expertise with the concepts of relational expertise, common knowledge and relational agency. These ideas are discussed in her 2010 book with Springer. In her later edited book Working relationally in and across practices (Cambridge University Press, 2017) researchers, who work with her ideas, have tested and refined these concepts in a range of different settings. Her research on practice, relational expertise and inter-professional work with vulnerable children and families also informs her interest in user engagement with research and its implications for the design of educational research. User engagement was discussed in her 2011 book with Mark Rickinson and Judy Sebba, in an exploration of knowledge exchange in the social sciences based in Oxford, and in study of school-university research relationships through the work of school-based research champions.

Her current research, informed by cultural-historical theory, is based at the University of Oslo. The research team has recently completed a Norwegian Research Council study of how elementary school teachers work successfully with shy and withdrawn children. The team has been awarded a further four years’ funding to examine shy children’s experiences of transitions between lessons in high school. She is currently co-authoring a book with Mariane Hedegaard for Cambridge University Press, where the two authors revisit their own research studies to make a case for a relational pedagogy, based in Vygotskian approaches to emotion, development and learning. She is also co-editing, with Helen Bound and Karen Evans and Arthur Chia, a collection for Taylor and Francis on current approaches to workplace learning. Her contribution, with Dorothy Sutherland Olsen, draws on a study of the transitions that arise through the introduction of new technologies into existing workplaces.

Publications since 2009

Books

  • Edwards, A., Daniels, H., Gallagher, T., Leadbetter, J. & Warmington, P. (2009) Improving Inter-professional Collaborations: multi-agency working for children’s wellbeing. London: Routledge.
  • Daniels, H., Edwards, A., Engeström, Y. & Ludvigsen, S. (Eds.) (2009) Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge.
  • Ellis, V., Edwards, A. & Smagorinsky, P.  (Eds.) (2009) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Being an Expert Professional Practitioner: the relational turn in expertise. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Rickinson, M., Sebba, J. & Edwards, A. (2011) Improving User-engagement in Educational Research. London: Routledge.
  • Hedegaard, M., Edwards, A. & Fleer, M. (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wells, G. & Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2013) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Edwards, A. (Ed.) (2017) Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Hedegaard, M.& Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2019) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (Eds.) (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer.
  • Bound, H., Edwards, A. & Evans, K. (Eds.) (forthcoming) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor and Francis.
  • Hedegaard, M. & Edwards, A. (forthcoming) Taking Children Seriously: a relational approach to Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chapters in Books

  • Edwards, A.  (2009) Becoming a Teacher, in H. Daniels, J. Porter & H. Lauder (Eds.) Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning: vol 1. London: Routledge, pp. 153-164.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Agency and Activity Theory: from the systemic to the relational, in A Sannino, H Daniels & K. Guttierez (Eds.) Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 197-211.
  • Edwards, A. & Kinti I. (2009) Working Relationally at Organisational Boundaries: negotiating expertise and identity, in H. Daniels, A. Edwards, Y. Engeström & S. Ludvigsen (Eds.)  Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge, pp. 126-139.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) How can CHAT help us to understand and develop teacher education?, in V. Ellis, A. Edwards & P. Smagorinsky (Eds.) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge, pp. 63-77.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Learning How to Know Who: professional learning for expansive practice between organisations, in S Ludvigsen, A. Lund, I. Rasmussen & R. Saljo (Eds.) Learning Across Sites. London: Routledge, pp. 17-32.
  • Edwards, A.  (2010) Qualitative Designs and Analysis, in G. MacNaughton, S. Rolfe & I. Siraj-Blatchford (Eds.) Doing Early Childhood Research: Theory and Process: an international perspective 2nd Edition. Melbourne: Allen and Unwin, pp.155-175.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) Expertise in the Children’s Workforce: knowledge and motivation in engagement with children, in M. Hedegaard, A. Edwards & M. Fleer (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 173-190.
  • Edwards, A. & Ellis, V.  (2012) The Professional Development of Teachers: European perspectives, in C. Day (Ed.) International Handbook on Teacher and School Development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) User Engagement and the Processes of Educational Research, in L. Farrell & T. Fenwick (Eds.) Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities. London:  Routledge
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Integrating Children’s Services, in G. Head (Ed.) Professionals, Children and the Community: working together, London: Pearson.
  • Edwards, A. & Thompson, M. (2013) Resourceful Leadership: revealing the creativity of organizational leaders, in A. Sannino & V. Ellis (Eds.) Learning and Collective Creativity: Activity-Theoretical and Sociocultural Studies. London: Routledge.  pp. 49-64.
  • Childs, A., Edwards, A. & McNicholl, J. (2013) Developing a Multi-layered System of Distributed Expertise: What does cultural historical theory bring to understandings of workplace learning in school university partnerships?, in O. McNamara et al. (Eds.) Teacher Learning in the Workplace: widening perspectives on practice and policy. Dordecht: Springer. pp. 29-45.
  • Lundsteen, N. & Edwards, A. (2013) Internship: navigating the practices of an investment bank, in G. Wells &   Edwards (Eds.) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.pp.155-168.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Learning from Experience in teaching; a cultural historical critique, in V. Ellis & J. Orchard (Eds.) Learning Teaching from Experience: Multiple Perspectives, International Contexts. London: Bloomsbury.pp.47-61.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Designing Tasks which Engage Learners with Knowledge, in I. Thompson (Ed.) Task Design,Subject Pedagogy and Student Engagement. London: Routledge. pp. 13-27.
  • Edwards, A. (2016) A Cultural-historical Approach to Practice: working within and across practices, in J. Lynch et al. (Eds.) Practice Theory: Diffractive readings in professional practice and education. London: Routledge.127-140.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural-historical Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: teaching to support student agency, in B. Leibowitz, V. Bozalek & P. Kahn (Eds.) Theorising Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Taylor and Francis. pp.124-138.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Introductory chapter, final chapter and a joint chapter on knowledge exchange in the social sciences with E. Stamou, in A. Edwards (Ed.), Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural Historical Theory and Pedagogy: the influence of Vygotsky on the field, in R. MacLean (Ed.) Handbook on Life in Schools and Classrooms: Past, present and future visions. Dordrecht, Springer. pp. 153-166.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Relational Expertise: a cultural-historical approach to teacher education, in Peters, B. Cowie & I Menter (Eds.) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 555-567.
  • Edwards, A. & Montecinos, C. (2017) Working Relationally on Complex Problems: building the capacity for joint agency in new forms of work, in M. Goller & S. Paloniemi (Eds.) Agency at Work. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 229-247.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) The Dialectic of Person and Practice: how cultural-historical accounts of agency can inform teacher education, in J. Clandinin & J. Husu (Eds.) The Sage Handbook on Research on Teacher Education, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. pp.269-285.
  • Edwards, A. & Hedegaard, M. (2019) Rethinking Professional Support for Challenging Transitions: enabling the agency of children, young people and their families, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 1-18.
  • Edwards, A. & Evangelou, M. (2019) Easing Transitions into School for Children from Socially Excluded ‘Hard to Reach’ Families: from risk and resilience to agency and demand, in M.Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 115-130.
  • Edwards, A. & Fay, Y. (2019) Supporting the Transitions to Work of Autistic Young People: building and using common knowledge, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp 262-278.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp. 1-20.
  • Edwards, A., Chan, J. & Tan, D. (2019) Motive Orientation and the Exercise of Agency: responding to recurrent demands in practices, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp.201-214.
  • Edwards, A. (in press) Learning for a High Skills Economy: what a cultural-historical approach can offer, in H. Bound, A. Chia, J. Tan & R. Lim Wei Ying (Eds.) Flipping the Lens from Teaching to Learning. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Edwards, A. & Sutherland Olsen, D. (forthcoming) Cultural-historical Understandings of Transitions in Changing Workplaces, in H. Bound, A. Edwards, K. Evans, A. Chia (Eds.) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor & Francis.
  • Edwards, A. (forthcoming) A Relational View of a Future-oriented Pedagogy: sustaining the agency of learners and teachers, in N. Hopwood & A. Sannino (Eds.) Agency and Transformation: Motives, mediation and motion. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Refereed Articles

  • Edwards, A. (2009) Understanding Boundaries in Inter-professional Work, The Scottish Educational Review, 41, 1, 5-21.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Relational Agency in Collaborations for the Wellbeing of Children and Young People, Journal of Children’s Services, 4, 1, 33-43.
  • Shaw, I., Morris, K &. Edwards, A. (2009) Technology, Social Services and Organizational Innovation or How Great Expectations in London and Cardiff are Dashed in Lowestoft and Cymtyrch, Journal of Social Work Practice,  23, 4, 383 – 400.
  • Edwards, A., Lunt, I. & Stamou, E. (2010) Inter-professional Work and Expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools, British Educational Research Journal, 36, 1, 27-45.
  • Edwards, A. (2011) Building Common Knowledge at Boundaries between Professional Practices, International Journal of Educational Research 50, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A & Daniels, H. (2012) The knowledge that matters in professional practices Journal of Education and Work 25, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) The role of common knowledge in achieving collaboration across practices Learning Culture and Social Interaction 1, 1, 22-32.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) A Tool for Public Services Research and Development, International Journal of Public Management. 11,1, 21-33.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Discussant’s Comments: Recognising and Realising Teachers’ Professional Agency, Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice. 21, 6, 779-784.
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. & Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: the development of the Oxford Education Deanery narrative, Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373. http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/edui.v6.27724
  • Hopwood, N., Day, C. & Edwards, A. (2016) Partnership Practice as Collaborative Knowledge Work: overcoming common dilemmas through an augmented view of professional expertise, Journal of Children’s Services. 11, 2, 111-123.
  • Engeness, I. & Edwards, A. (2016) The Complexity of Learning: Exploring the Interplay of Different Mediational Means in Group Learning with Digital Tools, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 61, 1, 650-667. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2016.1173093
  • Hopwood, N. & Edwards, A. (2017) How common knowledge is constructed and why it matters in collaboration between professionals and clients, International Journal of Educational Research, 83, 107–119.
  • Edwards, A. (2020) Agency, Common Knowledge and Motive Orientation: working with insights from Hedegaard in research on provision for vulnerable children and young people, Learning Culture and Social Interaction. 26, 100224. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.lcsi.2018.04.004
  • Mjelve, L.H., Nyborg, G., Edwards, A.& Crozier, R. (2019) Teachers’ Understandings of Shyness: psychosocial differentiation for student inclusion, British Educational Research Journal. 45(6), 1295- doi:10.1002/berj.3563
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, H., Edwards, A. & Crozier, R. (2020 ) Teachers’ Strategies for Enhancing Shy Children’s Engagement in Oral Activities: necessary but insufficient? International Journal of Inclusive Education. 1-16. doi:10.1080/13603116.2020.1711538
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A. & Nyborg, G. (2020) Leading for School Inclusion: how school leadership teams support shy students, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 1-14. doi:10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Solberg, S., Edward, A., Mjelve, L.H., & Nyborg, G. (in press). Working relationally with networks of support within schools: Supporting teachers in their work with shy students. Journal of Education for Children Placed at Risk (JESPAR), 1-23. doi.org/10.1080/10824669.2020.1854760
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A., & Nyborg, G. (2020). Leading for school inclusion and prevention? How school leadership teams support shy students and their teachers. Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, 1-14. doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Burn, K. Conway, R., Edwards, A. & Harries, E. (2021) The Role of School-based Research Champions in a School-University Partnership. British Educational Research Journal, 47(3). 616-633. doi.org/10.1002/berj.3675
  • Rickinson, M. & Edwards, A. (2021) The Relational Features of Evidence Use, Cambridge Journal of Education, 51(4), 509-526.  doi.org/10.1080/0305764X.2020.1865877
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, L.H., Edwards, A., Crozier, R. & Coplan, R. (2022) Working relationally with shy students: pedagogical insights from teachers and students. Learning, Culture and Social Interaction. authors.elsevier.com/sd/article/S2210-6561(22)00011-3

Reports

  • Edwards, A. & Stamou, E. (2009) The Development of Preventative Practices in England: implications for the children’s workforce. DCSF: Children’s Workforce Development Council
  • Hannan, S., Canwell, A. Longfils, H. & Edwards, A. (2011) The Resourceful Leader, Nottingham: National College
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Leading the Learning: how the intelligent leader builds capacity. Nottingham: National College.
  • Edwards, A. & Downes, P. (2013) Alliances for Inclusion: cross-sector policy synergies and inter-professional collaboration in and around schools. NESET for the European Commission.
  • Alexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. & Menter, I. (2014) Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools. Oxford University: CitiFoundation.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Inter-professional Working in and around Schools, in C. McLaughlin (Ed.) The Connected School: a design for wellbeing. London: Pearson / NCB.

Geoffrey Walford is Emeritus Professor of Education Policy and an Emeritus Fellow of Green Templeton College at the University of Oxford.

He was previously Reader in Education Policy at Oxford, and Senior Lecturer in Sociology and Education Policy at Aston Business School, Aston University, Birmingham.

He has academic degrees from Oxford, Kent, London and the Open Universities, has authored or edited more than 40 books, and published rather too many academic articles and book chapters. He was Joint Editor of the British Journal of Educational Studies from 1999 to 2002, and was Editor of the Oxford Review of Education from 2004 to 2010. He remains as a Deputy Editor of Ethnography and Education and serves on several editorial boards.

Professor Walford’s main research foci are the relationships between central government policy and local processes of implementation, private schools, choice of schools, religiously-based schools, and ethnographic research methodology. He remains engaged with various scholarly writing activities working, in particular, on issues connected to private schooling for the poor and social justice. He was awarded a DLitt from Oxford University in 2016.

Publications

Major articles and book chapters

  • Geoffrey Walford (2023) ‘Low-fee private schools.’  In Bob Tierney, Fazal Rizvi and Kadriye Wrcikan (editors-in-chief); Fazal Rizvi and Jason Beech (eds.) Section 1, Globalization and shifting geopolitics of education, International Encyclopedia of Education 4th edition, Vol 1 (Oxford: Elsevier) pp.355-365.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2022) ‘Country houses repurposed as private schools: what might be the motivations?’  Oxford Review of Education, 48, 1, pp. 14-27.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2021) ‘Country houses repurposed as private schools: building on inequality.’ Oxford Review of Education, 47, 3, pp. 369-385.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2021) ‘What is worthwhile auto-ethnography? Research in the age of the selfie.’ Ethnography and Education, 16, 1, pp. 31-43.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2020) ‘Interviews and interviewing in the ethnography of education.’ In George W. Noblit. (ed.) Oxford Encyclopedia of Qualitative Research Methods in Education (New York: Oxford University Press) (Reprint) pp. 672-685.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2020) ‘Ethnography is not qualitative.’ Ethnography and Education, 15, 1, pp. 122-136.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2019) ‘The provenance of Stowe. Percy Warrington: the founder schools wished to forget.’ History of Education Researcher, 104, pp. 100-108.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2018) ‘The impossibility of anonymity in ethnographic research.’ Qualitative Research, 18, 5, pp. 516-525.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2018) ‘Interviews and interviewing in the ethnography of education.’Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Education, Editor in Chief: George W. Noblit. On-line. DOI: 10.1093/acrefore/9780190264093.013.320, May, pp. 20.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2018) ‘Recognisable continuity. A defence of multiple methods.’ In Dennis Beach, Carl Bagley, and Sofia Maques da Silva (eds.) The Wiley Handbook of Ethnography of Education (London, Wiley) pp. 17-29.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2017) ‘Ruling-class classification and framing.’ In Agnés Van Zanten (ed.) Elites in Education, Volume 2, National Traditions and Cosmopolitism in Elite Education. (London, Routledge) (Reprint)
  • Geoffrey Walford (2016) ‘Ethnographic methodology: A Virtual Special Issue of Ethnography and Education. Introduction.’ Ethnography and Education.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2015) ‘The globalisation of low-fee private schools’ In Joseph Zajda (ed.) Second International Handbook on Globalisation, Education and Policy Research (Amsterdam, Springer) ISBN: 978-94-017-9492-3, pp. 309-20.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2014) ‘Site selection within comparative case study and ethnographic research.’ (Reprint) In Malcolm Tight (ed.) Case Studies (London, Sage)
  • Ian Macpherson, Susan Robertson and Geoffrey Walford (2014) ‘An introduction to privatisation, education and social justice.’ In Ian Macpherson, Susan Robertson and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) Education, Privatisation, and Social Justice: Case studies from Africa, South Asia, and South East Asia (Abingdon, Symposium) pp. 9-24.
  • Ingrid Lunt and Geoffrey Walford (2014) ‘Contributions to the sociology of education: Past, present and future. A Festschrift for John Furlong.’ Oxford Review of Education, 40, 4, pp. 411-414.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2014) ‘From City Technology Colleges to Free schools: Ideas of social justice.’ Research Papers in Education, 29, 3, pp. 315-329.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2014) ‘Introduction: Academies, Free Schools and social Justice.’ Research Papers in Education, 29, 3, pp. 263-267.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2013) ‘The development of private and public schools in England.’ In Aydin Gürlevik, Christian Palentien and Robert Heyer (eds.) Privatschulen versus staatliche Schulen (Wiesbaden, Germany: Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden) pp. 89-102.  ISBN: (pb) 978-3-531-18199-8; (e-book) 978-3-531-18978-9.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2013) ‘Low-fee private schools: a methodological and political debate.’ In Prachi Srivastava (ed.) Low-Fee Private Schooling: Aggravating equity or mitigating disadvantage? (Oxford: Symposium Books) pp. 199-213. ISBN: 978-1-873927-91-5.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2013) ‘State support for private schooling in India: What do the evaluations of the British Assisted Places Schemes suggest?’ Oxford Review of Education, 39, 4, pp. 533-547.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2013) ‘The development of private and public schools in England.’ In Aydin Gürlevik, Christian Palentien and Robert Heyer (eds.) Privatschulen versus staatliche Schulen (Wiesbaden, Germany: Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden) pp. 89-102.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2013) ‘Low-fee private schools: a methodological and political debate.’ In Prachi Srivastava (ed.) Low-Fee Private Schooling: Aggravating equity or mitigating disadvantage? (Oxford, Symposium Books) pp. 199-213.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2012) ‘Researching the powerful in education: a re-assessment of the problems.’ International Journal for Research and Method in Education, 35, 2, pp. 111-118
  • Geoffrey Walford (2011) ‘Globalization and low-fee private schools?’ Educational Practice and Theory, 33, 1, pp. 37-50.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2011) ‘The Oxford Ethnography Conference: A place in history?’ Ethnography and Education, 6, 2, pp. 133-145.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2011) ‘Low-fee private schools in England and in less economically developed countries. What can we learn from a comparison?’ Compare, 41, 3, pp. 401-413.
  • Eric Tucker, Madhu Viswanathan and Geoffrey Walford (2010) ‘Reflections on social measurement:  How social scientists generate, modify, and validate indicators and scales.’ In Geoffrey Walford, Eric Tucker and Madhu Viswanathan (eds.) The Sage Handbook of Measurement(London, Sage) pp. 1-5.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2010) ‘Faith-based schools in England after ten years of Tony Blair’, in Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Blair’s Educational Legacy? (London, Routledge) pp. 52-62.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2009) ‘For ethnography?’ Ethnography and Education, 4, 3, pp. 273-284.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2009) ‘Private schools in England.’ Zeitschrift für Pädagogik, 55, 5, pp. 716- 731.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2009) ‘The practice of writing ethnographic fieldnotes.’ Ethnography and Education, 4, 2, pp. 117-130.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2009) ‘Symposium review of: John Beck, Meritocracy, Citizenship and Education’ (with Anthony Giddens and Yoshiko Nozaki) British Journal of Sociology of Education, 30, 1, pp. 97-105.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘Finding the limits: autoethnography and being an Oxford University Proctor.’ In Paul Atkinson and Sara Delamont (eds.) Representing Ethnography (London, Sage) pp. 147-162.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘Selecting sites, and gaining ethical and practical access.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.)How to do Educational Ethnography (London, Tufnell Press) pp. 16-38.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘The nature of educational ethnography.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) How to do Educational Ethnography (London, Tufnell Press) pp. 1-15.
  • Martin Forsey, Scott Davies and Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘The globalisation of school choice: an introduction to key issues and concerns.’ In Martin Forsey, Scott Davies and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) The Globalisation of School Schoice? (Abingdon, Symposium Books) pp. 9-25.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘School choice in England: globalisation, policy borrowing or policy corruption? In Martin Forsey, Scott Davies and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) The Globalisation of School Schoice? (Abingdon, Symposium Books) pp. 95-109.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ’Faith-based schools in England after 10 years of Tony Blair.’ Oxford Review of Education, 34, 6, pp. 689-699.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘Muslim schools in England and the Netherlands: sustaining cultural continuity.’ In Zvi Bekerman and Ezra Kopelowitz (eds.) Cultural Education – Cultural Sustainability: Minority, diaspora, indigenous and ethno-religious groups in multicultural societies. (London, Routledge)
  • Geoffrey Walford (2007) ‘Finding the limits: autoethnography and being an Oxford University Proctor.’ In Alan Bryman (ed.) Qualitative Research 2, Volume 3 Issues of Representation and reflexivity (London, Sage) pp. 214-229.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2007) ‘Classification and framing of interviews in ethnographic interviewing. Ethnography and Education, 2, 2, pp. 145-157.
  • Geoffrey Walford and Prachi Srivastava (2007) ‘Examining Private Schooling in Less Economically Developed Countries: Key Issues and New Evidence.’ In Prachi Srivastava and Geoffrey Walford (2007) (eds.) Private Schooling in Less-Economically Developed Countries: Asian and African perspectives (Abingdon, Symposium Books)
  • Geoffrey Walford (2007) ‘Everyone generalizes, but ethnographers should resist doing so.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Methodological Developments in Ethnography (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 12) (Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, Elsevier)
  • Geoffrey Walford (2006) ‘New Christian schools in England: What are the equity mplications?’ International Journal of Learning, 13, 5, pp. 167-176.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2006) ‘From City Technology Colleges to sponsored grant-maintained schools.’ In David Phillips and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) Tracing Education Policy. Selections from the Oxford Review of Education(London, Routledge) pp. 359-375.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2006) ‘Introduction: education and the Labour Government.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Education and the Labour Government. An evaluation of two terms. (London, Routledge).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2005) ‘Learning and the local community: Is community involvement always a good thing?’ International Journal of Learning, 11, pp. 1219-1225.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2005) ‘Research ethical guidelines and anonymity.’ International Journal of Research and Method in Education, 28, 1, pp. 83-93.
  • Holger Daun, Reza Arjmand and Geoffrey Walford (2004) ‘Muslims and education in a global context.’ In Holger Daun and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) Educational Strategies among Muslims in the Context of Globalization. Some National Case Studies. (Leiden, Boston, Brill) pp. 5-36.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2004) ‘Private schooling in England’ (in Chinese) Journal of Non-Government Educational Development, 103, pp. 55-60.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2004) ‘When tradition meets modern law: changing the role of the Oxford University Proctors.’ Research in Education, 72, pp. 103-114.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2004) ‘No discrimination on the basis of irrelevant qualifications.’ Cambridge Journal of Education, 34, 3, pp. 353-361.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2004) ‘Finding the limits: autoethnography and being an Oxford University Proctor.’Qualitative Research, 4, 3, pp. 403-417.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘Country Report on school-based management in England.’ Precedings of the Third International Forum on Educational Reform Education Decentralization Revisited: School-Based Management(Bangkok, Office of the Education Council) pp. 1-23.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘Separate schools for religious minorities in England and the Netherlands: using a framework for the comparison and evaluation of policy.’Research Papers in Education , 18, 3, pp 1-19.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘School choice, educational change and inequality in England.’ In The Organising Committee (eds.) Proceedings of the 37th Annual Conference of the Japan Educational Administration Society(Tokyo, Dojidai Sha, Nichi-nichi Kyoiku Bunko)  pp. 19-49 (in Japanese) pp.147-172 (in English).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘Muslim schools in Britain.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) British Private Schools: research on policy and practice. (London, Woburn Press) pp. 158-174.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘Introduction.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) British Private Schools: research on policy and practice. (London, Woburn Press) pp. 1-8.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘School choice and educational change in England and Wales.’ In  David N. Plank and Gary Sykes (eds.) Choosing Choice: School Choice in International Perspective (New York & London, Teachers College Press) pp. 68-91.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘Education.’ In W. S. F. Pickering (ed.) Durkheim Today, New York, Oxford, Berghahn Books,  pp. 105-115.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘Introduction.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Doing a Doctorate in Educational Ethnography (Studies in  Educational Ethnography, Volume 7) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI, pp. 1-8.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘When policy moves fast, how long can ethnography take?’ In Bradley A. U. Levinson, Sandra L. Cade, Ana Padawer and Ana Patricia Elvir (eds.) Ethnography and Education Policy Across the Americas, Westport, CT, Praeger,  pp. 23-38.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘Why don’t we name our research sites?’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Educational Ethnography and Methodology, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 6) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI, pp. 95-105.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘Educational reform and sociology in England and Wales.’ In David L. Levinson, Peter W. Cookson, Jr., and Alan R. Sadovnik (eds.) Education and Sociology: An Encyclopaedia, New York and London, RoutledgeFalmer, pp. 211-219.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘Classification and framing of the curriculum in evangelical Christian and Muslim schools in England and the Netherlands.’ Educational Studies, 28, 4, pp. 403-419.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘Redefining school effectiveness.’ Westminster Studies in Education, 25, 1, pp. 47-58.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘The state and civil society in education in England: past developments and current problems.’ In Heinz-Dieter Meyer and William Lowe Boyd (eds.) Education between State, Markets, and Civil Society: Comparative perspectives, Mahwah, NJ & London, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, pp. 81-100.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Privatization in industrialized countries.’ In Henry M. Levin (ed.) Privatizing Education. Can the marketplace deliver choice, efficiency, equity, and social cohesion? Boulder, CO  & Oxford, Westview Press, pp. 178-200.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘From common schooling to selection? Affirming and contesting the comprehensive ideal, 1976-2001.’ In Robert Phillips and John Furlong (eds.)  Education, Reform and the State: Politics, Policy and Practice 1976-2001 London & New York, RoutledgeFalmer, pp. 45-57.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Introduction: ethnography and policy.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Ethnography and Education Policy, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 4) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI, pp. 1-9.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Durkheim, democracy and diversity: some thoughts on recent changes in England and Wales.’ In W S F Pickering (ed.) Emile Durkheim: Critical Assessments of Leading Sociologists. Volume VI,London & New York, Routledge, pp. 543-559.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Introduction’ (to Education Section). In W S F Pickering (ed.) Emile Durkheim: Critical Assessments of Leading Sociologists. Volume VI, London & New York, Routledge, pp. 365-371.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Funding for religious schools in England and the Netherlands. Can the piper call the tune?’ Research Papers in Education, 16, 4, pp. 359-380.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Evangelical Christian schools in England and the Netherlands.’  Oxford Review of Education, 27, 4, pp. 529-541.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Building identity through communities of practice: Evangelical Christian schools in the Netherlands.’ International Journal of Education and Religion, 2, 2, pp. 126-143.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘The fate of the new Christian schools: from growth to decline?’ Educational Studies,27, 4, pp. 465-477.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Site selection within comparative case-study and ethnographic research.’ Compare, 31, 2, pp.151-164.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Does the market ensure quality?’ Westminster Studies in Education 24, 1, pp. 23-33.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘School choice and social exclusion in England and Wales.’ In John Sayer and Johan Vanderhoven (eds.) School Choice, Equity and Social Exclusion, Leuven, Garant.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘Introduction.’ In Geoffrey Walford and Caroline Hudson (eds.) Genders and Sexualities in Educational Ethnography, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 3) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI/Elsevier.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘First days in the field: gender and sexuality in an evangelical Christian school.’ In Geoffrey Walford and Caroline Hudson (eds.) Genders and Sexualities in Educational Ethnography, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 3) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI/Elsevier.
  • W S F Pickering and Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘Introduction.’ In W. S.F. Pickering and Geoffrey Walford (eds.)Durkheim’s Suicide: a century of research and debate, London & New York, Routledge, pp. 1-10.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘What’s new about academic capitalism’ Learning & Managing, 6, 2, pp. 174-181.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘Government policy on private schooling in England’ Education and Society, 18, 1, pp. 25-43.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘From City Technology Colleges to sponsored grant-maintained schools’ Oxford Review of Education, 26, 2, pp. 145-158.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘A policy adventure: sponsored grant-maintained schools’ Educational Studies, 26, 2, pp. 247-262.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1999) ‘L’enseignement privé en Angleterre: tendances récentes et problèmes soulevés’Carrefours de l’éducation, 8, pp. 126-139.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1999) ‘Selling your way in: gaining access to research sites.’ In Alexander Massey and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) Explorations in Methodology, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 2)  Stamford, CT, JAI Press,  pp. 1-15.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1999) ‘Educating religious minorities within the English state-maintained sector’International Journal of Educational Management, 13, 2, pp. 98-106.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Durkheim, democracy and diversity: some thoughts on recent changes in England.’ In Geoffrey Walford and W. S. F. Pickering (eds.)  Durkheim and Modern Education, London & New York, Routledge, pp. 125-141.
  • W. S. F. Pickering and Geoffrey Walford (1988) ‘Introduction: Durkheim and education.’ In Geoffrey Walford and W. S. F. Pickering (eds.) Durkheim and Modern Education, London & New York, Routledge, pp. 1-16.
  • Alexander Massey and Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Children learning: Ethnographers learning.’ In Geoffrey Walford and Alexander Massey  (eds.) Children Learning in Context, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 1), Stamford, CT & London, JAI Press, pp. 1-18.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Essay review: Is there a ‘new variant’ diploma disease?’ Oxford Review of Education, 24, 3,  pp. 405-409.
  • David Rigoni and Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Questioning the quick-fix: Assertive Discipline and the 1997 Education White Paper’ Journal of Education Policy, 13, 3, pp. 443-452.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Compulsive writing behaviour: getting it published.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Doing Research About Education, London & Washington D.C., Falmer, pp. 184-198.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Research accounts count.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Doing Research About Education, London & Washington, D.C., Falmer, pp. 1-10.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Reading and writing the small print: The fate of sponsored grant-maintained schools.’  Educational Studies, 24, 2, pp. 241-257.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘School choice and the common good: a reply to Brighouse’ Oxford Review of Education, 23, 4, pp. 517-521.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997)  ‘The 14-19 curriculum in private schools.’ In Sally Tomlinson (ed.) Education 14-19: Critical Perspectives, London & Atlantic Highlands, NJ, Athlone, pp. 101-112.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘Diversity, choice and selection in England and Wales’ Educational Administration Quarterly 33, 2, pp. 158-169.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘Sponsored grant-maintained schools: extending the franchise?’ Oxford Review of Education, 23, 1, pp. 31-44.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘Education and private schools.’ In Anthony Giddens (ed.) Sociology: Introductory readings, Cambridge, Polity, pp. 329-336.
  • Steven Carroll and Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘The child’s voice in school choice’ Educational Management and Administration, 25, 2, pp. 169-180.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘Privatization and selection.’ In Richard Pring and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) Affirming the Comprehensive Ideal, London, Falmer.
  • Steven Carroll and Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘Parents’ responses  to the school quasi-market’ Research Papers in Education, 12, 1, pp. 3-26.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘Power and responsibility in pressure group activity.’ In Keith Watson, Sohan Modgil and Celia Modgil (eds.)  Educational Dilemmas: Debate and diversity, London, Cassell,  pp. 247-253 and 264-265.
  • Steven Carroll and Geoffrey Walford (1996) ‘A panic about school choice’ Educational Studies, 22, 3, pp. 393-407.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1996)  ‘School choice and equity in England and Wales’  Oxford Studies in Comparative Education, 6, 1, pp. 49-62.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1996) ‘Diversity and choice in school education: an alternative view’ Oxford Review of Education,  22, 2, pp. 143-154.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1996)  ‘Faith-based grant-maintained schools: Selective international policy borrowing from The Netherlands’ in John Ahier, Ben Cosin and Margaret Hales (eds.) Diversity and Change: Education, policy and selection, London, Routledge, pp. 63-78.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995)  ‘The Northbourne amendments: Is the House of Lords a garbage can?’ Journal of Education Policy, 10 (5) pp. 413-425.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995) ‘Faith-based schools, diversity and inequity.’ In Gwen Wallace (ed.)  Schools, Markets and Management, Bournmouth, Hyde Publications, pp. 13-20.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995) ‘The Christian Schools Campaign – a successful educational pressure group?’ British Educational Research Journal, 21 (4) pp. 451-464.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995)  ‘Faith-based grant-maintained schools: Selective international policy borrowing from The Netherlands.’ Journal of Education Policy, 10 (2) pp. 245-257.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995) ‘Classification and framing in English public boarding schools.’  In Paul Atkinson, Brian Davies and Sara Delamont (eds.) Discourse and Reproduction. Essays in honor of Basil Bernstein, New Jersey, USA, Hampton Press, pp. 191-207.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994)  ‘A return to selection?’ Westminster Studies in Education, 17, pp. 19-30.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994) ‘Political commitment in the study of the City Technology College, Kingshurst.’  In David Halpin and Barry Troyna (eds.) Researching Education Policy: Ethical and Methodological Issues, London, Falmer, pp. 94-106.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994)  ‘The dilemma of choice in education.’ In Ian Lawrence (ed.) Education Tomorrow, London, Cassell, pp. 130-144.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994)  ‘Reflections on researching the powerful.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Researching the Powerful in Education, London, UCL Press, pp. 222-231.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994)  ‘Ethics and power in a study of pressure group politics.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.)Researching the Powerful in Education, London, UCL Press, pp. 81-93.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994) ‘A new focus on the powerful.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Researching the Powerful in Education, London, UCL Press, pp. 2-11.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994) ‘Educational choice, control and inequity.’ In David Scott (ed.) Accountability and Control in Educational Settings, London, Cassell, pp. 73-86.
  • Colin Poyntz and Geoffrey Walford (1994) ‘The new Christian schools: A survey.’  Educational Studies, 20, 1, pp. 127-143.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994) ‘The new religious grant-maintained schools.’ Educational Management and Administration, 22, 2, pp. 123-130.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994)   ‘Weak choice, strong choice and the new Christian schools.’ In J. Mark Halstead (ed.)  Parental Choice and Education: Principles, policies and practice,  London, Kogan Page, pp. 139-150.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1993)  ‘Self-managing schools, choice and equity.’ In John Smyth (ed.) A Socially Critical View of the Self-Managing School, Basingstoke, Falmer, pp. 229-244.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1993)  ‘Selection for secondary schooling.’  In Briefings for the Paul Hamlyn Foundation National Commission on Education,  London, Heinemann, pp. 89-102.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1993) ‘The real lessons in school reform from Britain.’ Educational Policy, 7, 2, pp. 212-222.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1993) ‘Girls’ private schooling: past and present.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) The Private Schooling of Girls: Past and present, London, Woburn Press, pp. 9-32.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1992)  Selection for Secondary Schooling National Commission on Education Briefing Paper No. 7,  October.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1992) ‘Educational reform in the 1980s: National case studies. Great Britain.’ In Peter W. Cookson, Jr., Alan R. Sadovnik and Susan F. Semel (eds.) International Handbook of Educational Reform, Westport, CT, USA, Greenwood Press, pp. 209-227.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1992) ‘Educational choice and equity in Great Britain.’ Educational Policy (USA), 6, (2) pp. 123-138.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1992) ‘The reform of higher education.’ In Madeline Arnot and Len Barton (eds.)  Voicing Concerns: Sociological Perspectives on contemporary educational reforms, Wallingford, Triangle Books, pp. 186-200.
  • Sharon Gewirtz, Henry Miller and Geoffrey Walford (1991) ‘Parents’ individualist and collectivist strategies at the City Technology College, Kingshurst.’ International Studies in Sociology of Education, 1, pp. 173-191.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991)  ‘The changing relationship between government and higher education in Britain.’  In Guy Neave and Frans van Vught (ed.) Prometheus Bound. The changing relationship between government and higher education in Western Europe, Oxford, Pergamon, pp. 165-183.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991) ‘Researching the City Technology College, Kingshurst.’  In Geoffrey Walford (ed.)Doing Educational Research, London, Routledge, pp. 82-100.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991)  ‘Reflexive accounts of doing educational research.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.)  Doing Educational Research, London, Routledge, pp. 1-17.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991)  ‘Choice of school at the first City Technology College.’ Educational Studies, 17, 1, pp. 65-75.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991)  ‘City Technology Colleges: A private magnetism?’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.)  Private Schooling: Tradition, change and diversity, London, Paul Chapman, pp. 158-76.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991) ‘The reluctant private sector: of small schools, people and politics.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Private Schooling: tradition, change and diversity, London Paul Chapman, pp. 115-32.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1990)  ‘Developing choice in British education.’  Compare. A Journal of Comparative Education, 20, 1, pp 22-56.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1990) ‘The 1988 Education Reform Act for England and Wales: Paths to privatization.’ Educational Policy, 4, 2, pp. 127-44.
  • Mark H. Robson and Geoffrey Walford (1989) ‘Independent schools and tax policy under Mrs Thatcher.’ Journal of Education Policy, 4, 2, pp. 149-62.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1989) ‘Scotland: Changes in government policy towards private schools.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.)  Private Schools in Ten Countries: Policy and practice, London, Routledge, pp. 32-56.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1989)  ‘Private schools policy and practice in comparative perspective.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Private Schools in Ten Countries: Policy and practice, London, Routledge, pp. 1-7.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1989)  ‘Bullying in public schools: Myth and reality.’ In Delwyn P. Tattum and David Lane (eds.) Bullying in Schools, London, Trentham Books, pp. 81-88.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1988)  ‘Young people’s views about the Youth Training Scheme in Scotland.’ British Journal of Sociology of Education, 9, 4, pp. 437-51.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1988)  ‘Shouts of joy and cries of pain: investigating young people’s comments on leaving school and entering the labour market.’ In David Raffe (ed.)  Education and the Youth Labour Market: Schooling and scheming, Lewes, Falmer, pp. 243-65.
  • Geoffrey Walford, June Purvis and Andrew Pollard (1988)  ‘Ethnography, policy and the emergence of the new vocationalism.’  In Andrew Pollard, June Purvis and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) Education, Training and the New Vocationalism: Experience and policy, Milton Keynes, Open University Press, pp. 3-14.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1988) ‘Training the elite – for education, training and jobs.’ Collected Original Resources in Education, 12, 1, pp. 1-19.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1988)  ‘The privatisation of British higher education.’ European Journal of Education, 23, 1/2, pp. 47-64.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1988)  ‘The Scottish Assisted Places Scheme. A comparative study of the origins, nature and practice of the APS in Scotland, England & Wales.’ Journal of Education Policy, 3, 2, pp. 137-53.
  • Mark H. Robson and Geoffrey Walford (1988)  ‘U.K. tax policy and independent schools.’ British Tax Review, 2, pp. 38-54.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1987)  ‘How important is the independent sector in Scotland’ Scottish Educational Review, 19, 2, pp. 108-21.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1987)  ‘How dependent is the independent sector?’ Oxford Review of Education, 13, 3, pp. 275-96.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1987)  ‘Research role conflicts and compromises in public schools.’  In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Doing Sociology of Education, Lewes, Falmer, pp. 45-65.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1987)  ‘The research process.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Doing Sociology of Education, Lewes, Falmer, pp. 1-15.
  • Geoffrey Walford and Sïan Jones (1986) ‘The Solihull adventure. An attempt to reintroduce selective education.’  Journal of Education Policy, 1, 3, pp. 239-53.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1986)  ‘Ruling-class classification and framing.’  British Educational Research Journal, 12, 2, pp. 183-95.
  • Henry Miller and Geoffrey Walford (1986) ‘A case study of financial constraints in British universities.’ IHELG Monograph, Number 86/5, Institute for Higher Education Law and Governance, University of Houston, Texas, USA.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1985)  ‘The influence of external pressure groups on the school curriculum: Two examples.’  Collected Original Resources in Education, 9, 2, pp. 1-45.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1985)  ‘The construction of a curriculum area.’ British Journal of Sociology of Education, 6, 2, pp. 155-71.
  • Henry Miller and Geoffrey Walford (1985)  ‘University cut and thrust.’  In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Schooling in Turmoil, Beckenham, Croom Helm, pp. 244-68.
  • Richard Thompson and Geoffrey Walford (1985)  ‘Teachers learning about industry: The two curricula and cultural disadvantage.’  In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Schooling in Turmoil, Beckenham, Croom Helm, pp. 59-83.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1984)  ‘The changing professionalism of public school teachers.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) British Public Schools: Policy and practice, Lewes, Falmer, pp. 111-35.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1984)   ‘The numbering of postgraduate research.’  Higher Education Review, 16, 2, pp. 61-65.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1983)  ‘Science education and sexism in the Soviet Union.’  School Science Review, 85, 2, pp. 213-24.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1983)  ‘Postgraduate education and the student’s contribution to research.’ British Journal of Sociology of Education, 4, 3, pp. 241-54.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1983) ‘Research state and research style: A sociological analysis of postgraduate education.’  Collected Original Resources in Education, 7, 1, pp. 1-108.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1983)  ‘Science textbook images and the reproduction of sexual divisions in society.’ Research in Science and Technological Education, 1, 1, pp. 65-72.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1983)  ‘Parental attitudes and girls in physical science.’ School Science Review, 64, pp. 566-67.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1983)  ‘Girls in boys’ public schools: A prelude to further research.’ British Journal of Sociology of Education, 4, 1, pp. 39-54.
  • Leo Raby and Geoffrey Walford (1981) ‘Job status aspirations and their determinants for middle and lower stream pupils in an urban, multi-racial comprehensive school.’ British Educational Research Journal, 7, 2, pp. 173-81.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1981)  ‘Classification and framing in higher education.’ Studies in Higher Education, 6, 2, pp. 147-58.
  • Leo Raby and Geoffrey Walford (1981) ‘Career related attitudes and their determinants for middle- and low-stream pupils in an urban, multi-racial comprehensive school.’ Research in Education, 25, pp. 19-35.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1980) ‘Why physics students start doctorates.’ Studies in Higher Education, 5, 1, pp. 77-80.

Books

  • Geoffrey Walford (2006) Markets and Equity in Education London, Continuum, ISBN: 0 8264 8735 1.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2005) Private Education: tradition and continuity
    London, Continuum, ISBN: 0 8264 8599 5.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) Doing Qualitative Educational Research: a personal guide to the research process, London, Continuum. ISBN: 0-8264-4701-5,  0-8264-4702-3.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) Policy, Politics and Education – sponsored grant-maintained schools and religious diversity, Aldershot, Ashgate. ISBN: 0-7456-1031-4.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1996) Public School, Japanese edition of Life in Public Schools, translated by Yo Takeuchi. Japan, Sekai Shisosha Kyogakusha. ISBN: 4-7907-0626-5.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995) Educational Politics: Pressure groups and faith-based schools, Aldershot, Avebury, ISBN: 1-85628-907-9.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994) Choice and Equity in Education, London, Cassell, ISBN: 0-304-32775-1,  0-304-32774-3.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1993) Contemporary British Education and Privatization, Japanese edition of Privatization and Privilege in Education with new forward and postscript, translated by Norio Iwahashi, Kyoto, Japan, Houritu-Bunka-sha, ISBN: 4589-01705-9.
  • Geoffrey Walford and Henry Miller (1991) City Technology College, Milton Keynes, Open University Press, ISBN: 0335 09275 6.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1990) Privatization and Privilege in Education, London & New York, Routledge, ISBN: 0415 04247 X,  0415 04248 8.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1987) Restructuring Universities: Politics and power in the management of change, Beckenham, Croom Helm, ISBN: 07099 3694 X.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1986) Life in Public Schools, London, Methuen, ISBN: 0416 37170 1,  0416 37180 9.
  • Richard Thompson and Geoffrey Walford (1983) Teachers into Industry, Birmingham, AEEM, ISBN: 0903 703 14 9.

Edited books

  • Prachi Srivastava and Geoffrey Walford (2018) Non-State Actors in Education in the Global South. London, Routledge. ISBN: 978-1-138-57067-2 (hb), 143 pp.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2016)(ed.) Academies, Free Schools and social Justice (Didcot, Routledge) ISBN 13: 978-1-138-96007-7, 118 pp.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2016)(ed.) Privatization, Education and Social Justice (Didcot, Routledge) ISBN 13: 978-1-138-59439-7, 150 pp.
  • Ian Macpherson, Susan Robertson and Geoffrey Walford (eds.)(2014) Education, Privatisation, and Social Justice: Case studies from Africa, South Asia, and South East Asia (Abingdon, Symposium)
  • Geoffrey Walford, Eric Tucker and Madhu Viswanathan (2010) (eds.) The Sage Handbook of Measurement (London, Sage) ISBN: 978-1-4129-4814-2.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2010) (ed.) Blair’s Educational Legacy? (London, Routledge) ISBN: 0-415-48305-0.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) (ed.) How to do Educational Ethnography, London, Tufnell Press, ISBN: 978-1-872767-92-5 (pb).
  • Martin Forsey, Scott Davies and Geoffrey Walford (2008(eds.) The Globalisation of School VChoice? Abingdon, Symposium Books, ISBN: 978-1-873927-12-0 (pb).
  • Prachi Srivastava and Geoffrey Walford (2007) (eds.) Private Schooling in Less-Economically Developed Countries: Asian and African Perspectives Abingdon, Symposium Books. ISBN: 978-1-873927-85-4 (pb).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2007) (ed.) Methodological Developments in Ethnography (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 12) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, Elsevier.  ISBN: 0-7623-1437-0 (hb).
  • David Phillips and Geoffrey Walford (2006) (eds.) Tracing Education Policy: Selections for the Oxford Review of Education Abingdon, Routledge. ISBN: 0-413-39861-4 (hb).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2006) (ed.) Education and the Labour Government: an evaluation of two termsAbingdon, Routledge. ISBN: 0 415 36870 7 (hb).
  • Geoff Troman, Bob Jeffrey and Geoffrey Walford (2005) (eds.) Methodological issues and practices in Ethnography. (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 11) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, Elsevier.  ISBN: 0-7623-1252-1 (hb).
  • Geoff Troman, Bob Jeffrey and Geoffrey Walford (2004) (eds.) Identity, Agency, and Social Institutions in Educational Ethnography. (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 10) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, Elsevier. ISBN: 0-7623-1144-4 (hb).
  • Bob Jeffrey and Geoffrey Walford (2004) (eds.)Ethnographies of Educational and Cultural Conflicts: Strategies and resolutions. (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 9) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, Elsevier. ISBN: 07623-11126 (hb).
  • Holger Daun and Geoffrey Walford (2004) (eds.) Educational Strategies among Muslims in the Context of Globalization. Leiden, Brill. ISBN: 90-04-13675-4 (hb).
  • Geoffrey Walford and W. S. F. Pickering (2003) (ed.) Durkheim and Modern Education, Japanese Edition. Tokyo, Tokyo Metropolitan University Press. ISBN: 4-88683-496-5 (hb).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) (ed.) British Private Schools: research on policy and practice, London, Woburn Press. ISBN: 0-7130-0228-X,  0-7130-4048-3.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) (ed.) Investigating Educational Policy through Ethnography, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume  Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-1018-9 (hb).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) (ed.) Doing a Doctorate in Educational Ethnography, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 7) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-0906-7 (hb).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) (ed.) Debates and Developments in Ethnographic Methodology, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 6) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-0893-1.
  • Phil Carspecken and Geoffrey Walford (2001) (eds.) Critical Educational Ethnography,
    (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 5) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-0797-8.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) (ed.) Ethnography and Education Policy, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 4) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-0768-4.
  • Geoffrey Walford and Caroline Hudson (2000) (eds.) Genders and Sexualities in Educational Ethnography, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 3) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-0738-2.
  • W. S. F. Pickering and Geoffrey Walford (2000) (eds.) Durkheim’s Suicide: a century of research and debate, London & New York, Routledge. ISBN: 0-415-20582-4.
  • Alexander Massey and Geoffrey Walford (1999) (eds.) Explorations in Methodology, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 2) Stamford, CT, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-0563-0.
  • Geoffrey Walford and Alexander Massey (1998) (eds.) Children Learning in Context, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 1). London & Greenwich, CT, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-76230-436-7.
  • Geoffrey Walford and W. S. F. Pickering (1998) (eds.) Durkheim and Modern Education, London & New York, Routledge. ISBN: 0-415-18168-2.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1998) (ed.) Doing Research about Education, London & Washington D.C., Falmer. ISBN: 0-7507-0782-8,  0-7507-0783-6.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) (ed.) Choice, Diversity and Equity in Secondary Schooling, Special Issue of Oxford Review of Education. ISSN:  0305-4985 .
  • Richard Pring and Geoffrey Walford (1997) (eds.) Affirming the Comprehensive Ideal, London & Washington D.C., Falmer. ISBN: 0-7507-0619-8,  0-7507-0620-1.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1996) (ed.) School Choice and the Quasi-Market, Special Issue of Oxford Studies in Comparative Education, Wallingford, Triangle Books. ISBN: 1-873927-23-1.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995) (ed.) La Otra Cara de la Investigación Educativa, Spanish edition of Doing Educational Research, translated by Javier Orduna Cosmen. Madrid, La Muralla. ISBN: 84-7133-646-4.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994) (ed.) Researching the Powerful in Education, London, UCL Press, ISBN: 1-85728-133-0, 1-85728-134-9.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1993) (ed.) The Private Schooling of Girls: Past and present, London, Woburn Press, ISBN: 0-7130-0186-0.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1992) (ed.) Privatne Skole. Iskustva u deset zemalja, Croatian edition of Private Schools in Ten Countries, translated by Mirna Varlandy Supek, Zagreb, Croatia, EDUCA Publishing House, ISBN: 86-7841-002-7.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991) (ed.) Doing Educational Research, London, Routledge, ISBN: 0415 05289 0,  0415 05290 4.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991) (ed.) Private Schooling: Tradition, change and diversity, London, Paul Chapman, ISBN: 185396 116 7.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1989) (ed.) Private Schools in Ten Countries: Policy and practice, London & New York, Routledge, ISBN: 0415 03464 7.
  • Andrew Pollard, June Purvis and Geoffrey Walford (1988) (eds.) Education, Training and the New Vocationalism: experience and policy, Milton Keynes & Philadelphia, Open University Press, ISBN: 0335 15845 5,  0335 15844 7.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1987) (ed.) Doing Sociology of Education, Lewes & Philadelphia, Falmer, ISBN: 085000 145 6,  085000 146 4.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1985) (ed.) Schooling in Turmoil, Beckenham, Croom Helm, ISBN: 07099 3618 4.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1984) (ed.) British Public Schools: Policy and practice,
    Lewes & Philadelphia, Falmer, ISBN: 0905 273 84 2,  0905 273 83 4.

Anne’s main areas of research in Mathematics Education are exemplification and task design in mathematics teaching and learning, from a variation theory perspective; the role of mathematics education in social justice issues; the use of fine-grained approaches to analysis of mathematics interaction within socio-cultural perspectives and the school mathematics curriculum.

Detailed information, papers, presentations and activities can be found on her website at pmtheta.com and on researchgate.net.

Anne convened and co-edited an Study on Task Design for the International Committee on Mathematics Education and has co-authored a book about learning key ideas in secondary mathematics – Key Ideas in Teaching Mathematics for Oxford University Press.

Her most recent publication is the book: Care in Mathematics Education published by Palgrave-Macmillan.

She is a member of the Association of Teachers of Mathematics (ATM), the British Society for Research into the Learning of Mathematics, the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education and the Higher Education Academy and the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group. She is a Fellow of the International Society for Design and Development in Education.  In retirement she runs, with her husband John Mason, free workshops for teachers and others on key conceptual themes that run throughout mathematics (see pmtheta@home on pmtheta.com).

Anne is a member of the Quaker Values in Education Group of the Society of Friends, see: Rowe, D. and Watson, A. (eds.) (2018)  Faith and Experience in Education: essays on Quaker perspectives. London: Trentham Press.

Activities in curriculum
  • Two syntheses of research about how children learn mathematics for the Nuffield Foundation: Key Understandings in Learning Mathematics (with Nunes and Bryant) and Key Ideas in Teaching Mathematics (with Jones and Pratt).
  • Member of the expert drafting panel for the primary and secondary mathematics National Curriculum for the Department for Education.
  • Curriculum Advisor to the Welsh Assembly.
Publications
Selected recent papers
  • Biza, I., Hewitt, A., Watson, A., Mason, J. (2019) Generalization Strategies in Finding the nth Term Rule for Simple Quadratic Sequences. International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, (), 1-22 DOI 10.1007/s10763-019-10009-0
  • Venkat, H., Askew, M., Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2019) Architecture of Mathematical Structure. FLM 39(1), 19-23.
  • Biza, I., Hewitt, A., Watson, A., Mason, J. (2019) Generalization Strategies in Finding the nth Term Rule for Simple Quadratic Sequences. International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, (), 1-22 DOI 10.1007/s10763-019-10009-0
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018) A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice.  73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • Al-Murani, T., Kilhamn, C., Morgan, D., & Watson, A. (2018). Opportunities for learning: the use of variation to analyse examples of a paradigm shift in teaching primary mathematics in England. Research in Mathematics Education, 1-19.
  • Watson, A., Ayalon, M., & Lerman, S. (2018). Comparison of students’ understanding of functions in classes following English and Israeli national curricula. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 97(3), 255-272.
  • Ayalon, M., Watson, A. & Lerman, S. (2016) Students’ conceptualisations of function revealed through definitions and examples. Research in Mathematics Education. 19(1), 1-19
  • Watson, A. (2016) Pedagogy of variations: synthesis of various notions of variation pedagogy in Huang, R. & Li, Y. (eds.) Teaching and learning mathematics through variation. p85-105. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers
  • Ayalon, M., Watson, A. & Lerman, S. (2016) Reasoning about variables in 11 to 18 year olds: informal, schooled and formal expression in learning about functions. Mathematics Education Research Journal. 28(3), 379-404.
  • Ayalon, M., Watson, A., & Lerman, S. (2015). Progression Towards Functions: Students’ Performance on Three Tasks About Variables from Grades 7 to 12. International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, 90(3), 321-339
  • Ayalon, M., Watson, A. and Lerman, S. (2015) Functions represented as linear sequential data: relationships between presentation and student responses Educational Studies in Mathematics.Online DOI 10.1007/s10649-015-9628-9
  • Watson, A. and Ohtani, M. (2015) Themes and issues in mathematics education concerning task design: Editorial introduction. In Watson, A. and Ohtani, M. (eds.) Task Design in Mathematics Education: An ICMI study.  (pp. 3-18 ) Heidelberg: Springer
  • Watson, A. and Thompson, D. (2015) Design issues related to text-based tasks. In Watson, A. and Ohtani, M. (eds.) Task Design in Mathematics Education: An ICMI study.  (pp.143-190) Heidelberg: Springer.
  • Watson, A., De Geest, E. (2014) Department-initiated change. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(3), 351-368.
Selected Books
  • Watson, A. (2021) Care in Mathematics Education: Alternative educational spaces and practices. Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Watson, A. (ed.) (2018) Variation in mathematics: A collection of writings from ATM Mathematics Teaching. Association of Teachers of Mathematics, Derby, UK.
  • Watson, A. and Ohtani, M. (2015) (Eds.) Task Design in Mathematics Education: An ICMI study.  Heidelberg: Springer.
  • Watson, A.,  Jones, K. and Pratt, D. (2013)  Key Ideas in Teaching Mathematics: Research-based guidance for ages 9-19 (Oxford University Press + Nuffield website)
  • Watson and P. Winbourne (eds.) (2007) New Directions for Situated Cognition in Learning Mathematics, pub. Springer
  • Watson, A. (2006) Raising Achievement in Secondary Mathematics Maidenhead, Open University Press
  • Watson, A. and Mason, J. (2005) Mathematics as a constructive activity: learners generating examples. Lawrence Erlbaum Publishers.

David Phillips is Emeritus Professor of Comparative Education, and Emeritus Fellow of St Edmund Hall.

A linguist by origin, David Phillips now works exclusively on various aspects of comparative and international education, with a particular focus on policy issues in historical context. He is the author of many publications, especially on education in Germany (more particularly in the post-war and post-unification periods) and on policy ‘borrowing’ in education. He has edited  Comparative Education, Research in Comparative and International Education, and the Oxford Review of Education and  and serves on the editorial boards of various other journals; he also edits the book series Oxford Studies in Comparative Education. He is co-chair of the Anglo-German Educational Research Group (www.aerg.org)

He has been Chair of the British Association for Comparative and International Education (BAICE). In 1990-91 he served on a commission of the German Wissenschaftsrat which reported to the German government on the future of teacher education in the territory of the former German Democratic Republic, and he has (2003-4) been a member of a commission appointed by the Minister for Science, Culture and the Arts in Baden-Württemberg with the task of evaluating educational studies in higher education in that state of the Federal Republic of Germany. He has evaluated projects for the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft and for other research bodies. He is a Fellow of the Social Sciences Academy and a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society.

Professor Phillips’s main teaching involved theoretical and methodological issues in comparative education, educational policy in Western Europe (particularly EU countries) and in Eastern Europe, in Japan, and in the United States. Many of his doctoral students focused on education in Germany and Japan, and on a range of topics involving education and training policy in the European Union as well as on aspects of educational policy borrowing in a variety of contexts.

Publications
  • Zur Universitätsreform in der Britischen Besatzungszone 1945-1948, Böhlau 1983
  • (Editor): Hochschuloffiziere und Wiederaufbau des Hochschulwesens in Westdeutschland 1945-1952, Teil 1: Die Britische Zone, Lax, 1990
  • (Editor): Lessons of Cross-National Comparison in Education, Triangle Books, 1992
  • (Editor, with Michael Kaser): Education and Economic Change in Eastern Europe, Triangle Books, 1992
  • Pragmatismus und Idealismus: Das ‘Blaue Gutachten’ und die Britische Hochschulpolitik in Deutschland 1948, Böhlau, 1995
  • (Editor, with others): Education for Reconstruction, Symposium Books, 1998
  • (Editor): Education in Germany: Tradition and Reform in Historical Context, Routledge, 1995
  • (Editor, with Michael Kaser): Aspects of Education and the European Union, Triangle Books, 1995
  • (Editor, with others): Learning From Comparing: New Directions in Comparative Educational Research , Vol. 1, Contexts, Classrooms and Outcomes, Symposium Books, 1999 (with Robin Alexander and Patricia Broadfoot); Vol.2, Policy, Professionals and Development,: Symposium Books, 2000 (with Robin Alexander and Marilyn Osborn)
  • (Editor): Education in Eastern Germany Since Unification, Symposium Books, 2000
  • ‘Reconstructing Education in Germany: Some Similarities and Contrasts in the Post-War and Post-Unification Rethinking in Educational Provision’, in: Leslie J. Limage (ed): Democratizing Education and Educating Democratic Citizens: International and Historical Perspectives, New York (Routledge/Falmer), 2001
  • ‘Helena Deneke and the Women of Germany. A Note on Post-War Reconstruction’, German Life and Letters, Vol.53 No.1, 2000
  • Reflections on British Interest in Education in Germany in the Nineteenth Century. (A Progress Report), Educa, Lisbon, 2002
  • ‘Comparative Historical Studies in Education: Problems of Periodisation Reconsidered’, British Journal of Educational Studies, Vol.50, No.3, 2002
  • ‘Beyond Travellers’ Tales: Some Nineteenth-Century British Commentators on Education in Germany’, Oxford Review of Education, Vol.26 No.1, 2000
  • ‘Comparative Studies and “Cross-National Attraction” in Education: a typology for the analysis of English interest in educational policy and provision in Germany, Educational Studies, Vol.28, No.4, 2002 (with Kimberly Ochs)
  • ‘Processes of Policy Borrowing in Education: Some Explanatory and Analytical Devices, (with Kimberly Ochs), Comparative Education, Vol. 39, No.4, 2003
  • (Editor, with Roger Goodman): Can the Japanese Change Their Education System? Symposium Books, 2003
  • (Editor, with Hubert Ertl): Implementing European Union Education and Training Policy: A Comparative Study of Issues in Four Member States, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2003
  • Articles on ‘Helena Deneke’, ‘Evelyn Spearing’, and ‘Edith Wardale’, New Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004
  • ‘Researching Policy Borrowing: Some Methodological Problems in Comparative Education’, British Educational Research Journal, Vol.30 No.6, 2004 (with Kimberly Ochs)
  • ‘A Typology of Cross-National Attraction in Education’, in: Gita Steiner-Khamsi (ed.): The Global Politics of Educational Borrowing and Lending, Teachers College Press, 2004
  • (Editor, with Kimberly Ochs): Educational Policy Borrowing: Historical Perspectives, Symposium Books, 2004
  • ‘Policy Borrowing in Education: Frameworks for Analysis’, in: Joseph Zajda (ed.): International Handbook on Globalisation, Education and Policy Research: Global Pedagogies and Policies, Springer, 2005
  • ‘Comparative Education: An Approach to Educational Inquiry’, in: Clifton Conrad and Ronald Serlin (eds.): The Sage Handbook on Research in Education: Engaging Ideas and Enriching Inquiry, Sage, 2005
  • ‘Michael Sadler and Comparative Education’, Oxford Review of Education, Vol. 32, No.1, 2006
  • Comparative and International Education: An Introduction to Theory, Method and Practice, Continuum, 2006 (with Michele Schweisfurth)
  • (Editor): Special issue of Comparative Education on ‘Mapping EU Education and Training Policy’, Vol.42, No.1, 2006
  • (Editor): Special issue of Oxford Review of Education on ‘Comparative Inquiry and Educational Policy Making’, Vol.42, No.3, 2006
  • The German Example: English Interest in Educational Provision in Germany Since 1800, Continuum 2011
  • ‘Aspects of Education for Democratic Citizenship in Post-War Germany, Oxford Review of Education, Vol.38, No.6, 2012
  • Investigating Education in Germany: Historical Studies from a British Perspective, Routledge 2015
  • Educating the Germans. People and Policy in the British Zone of Germany, 1945-1949, 2018
Research

David Phillips’s main research interests are in education in Germany, transition in education in eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, educational policy ‘borrowing’, theoretical perspectives in comparative education, and EU education and training policy.

Much of David Phillips’s recent research has been in the area of educational policy borrowing and in EU education and training policy. He recently (1998-2002 inclusive) directed a five-year EU-funded project (PRESTIGE – ‘Problems of Educational Standardisation and Transition in a Global environment’) in this latter area, and oversaw and contributed to the many publications which emerged from the project. Currently the focus of his work is on British interest in educational provision in Germany over the past 200 years. In 2005, together with Alis Oancea, he organised an international seminar funded by the European Science Foundation on the subject ‘15 Years On: Post-communist transitions and European integration of central and eastern European Countries’.

One of his recent books is The German Example: English Interest in Educational Provision in Germany Since 1800 (Continuum,2011), and he has most recently published Educating the Germans, a study of British educational policy in occupied Germany, 1945-1949.  The research for this book was supported by a Leverhulme Trust Emeritus Fellowship awarded in 2012. In 2015 Routledge published Investigating Education in Germany: Historical Studies from a British Perspective. 

Professor of Sociology of Education in the Department of Education from 2010-2015, and before that Director of the Centre for Educational Sociology (CES), University of Edinburgh, Jenny also worked at Strathcyde, Keele, UWE Bristol, and the Open University.

She is an Honorary Professorial Visiting Fellow in the School of Social and Political Sciences, the University of Edinburgh, and has an attachment to the University of Umea, Sweden. She is a Fellow of the British Academy and has been a visiting scholar at Helsinki University, Finland. She holds an honorary doctorate from Turku University, Finland and is a member of the ESF College of Expert Reviewers. She teaches on the EU funded summer school in European Education Studies (SUSEES). The MOOC may be accessed here http://www.susees.eu/mooc-2017-lecture-2-governing-education-europe-changing-role-knowledge/

Research

Jenny’s most recent funded research was a Leverhulme Emeritus Fellowship, on Governing Education: knowledge and policy in England and Scotland since 1986. The study investigates the changing relationship between knowledge and policy in governing education in the period 1986-2015 in England and Scotland.

Jenny also continues to research and publish on education policy with a focus on governance and governing, through investigation of the resources that are being mobilized by new governing forms and through new policy technologies. She works in collaboration with colleagues in the UK and Europe, located in a variety of disciplines-including political science and social policy.

Publications
Recent books
  • Ozga, J (2016) (ed) Sage Library of Educational Thought and Practice: Sociology of Education (four volumes)
  • Fenwick. T., Mangez, E., and Ozga.J. (Eds) (2014) Governing Knowledge: Comparison, Knowledge-Based Technologies and Expertise in the Regulation of Education, (World Yearbook of Education 2014) London, Routledge
  • 2011: Fabricating Quality in Europe: data and education governance (edited with Peter Dahler-Larsen, Christina Segerholm and Hannu Simola London, Routledge
  • 2007: Lingard, B and Ozga, J (eds) The Routledge Reader in Education Policy and Politics, London, Routledge.
  • 2006: Ozga, J. Seddon T and Popkewitz T.S. (eds) Research and Policy: steering the knowledge-based Economy (World Yearbook of Education 2006) London, Routledge
Recent articles
  • Ozga, Jenny (2021) Problematising policy: the development of (critical) policy sociology, Critical Studies in Education, 62:3, 290-305, DOI: 10.1080/17508487.2019.1697718
  • Ozga, Jenny (2021) Who governs? Political leadership in transnational times, School Leadership & Management, 41:1-2, 6-21, DOI: 10.1080/13632434.2020.1789857
  • Ozga, Jenny (2020) The politics of accountability. Journal of Educational Change 21, 19–35 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10833-019-09354-2
  • Ozga, Jenny, & Arnott, M. A. (2019). Governando para além do PISA: conhecimento, redes e narrativas. [Governing Beyond PISA: knowledge, networks and narratives] Roteiro,44(3), 1-22. https://doi.org/10.18593/r.v44i3.21004
  • Ozga, J (2017) ‘Education policy should not be driven by performance data’ Nature: Human Behaviour Vol 1 Issue 1 http://www.nature.com/articles/s41562-016-0014
  • Ozga, Jenny (2016) Trust in numbers? Digital Education Governance and the inspection process  European Educational Research Journal Vol. 15(1) 69–81
  • Margaret Arnott & Jenny Ozga (2016) Education and nationalism in Scotland: governing a ‘learning nation’, Oxford Review of Education, 42:3, 253-265, DOI: 10.1080/03054985.2016.1184865
  • Ozga J and Lawn, M (2014) Frameworks of Regulation: Evidence, Knowledge and Judgement in Inspection Introduction to Special issue of Sisyphus, Journal of Education Volume 2 Issue 1 pp 7-16 (available at http://revista.rcap.pt/sisyphus)
  • Ozga, J (2014) Knowledge, Inspection and the Work of Governing Special issue of Sisyphus, Journal of Education Volume 2 Issue 1 pp16-40 (available at http://revista.rcap.pt/sisyphus)
  • Ozga, J and Lawn, M (2014) Inspectorates and Politics-the trajectories of inspection in England and Scotland  Revue Francaise de Pedagogie 186 pp11-23
  • Ozga, J Baxter, J, Clarke, J. Grek, S and Lawn M (2013) ‘The Politics of Educational Change: Governing and School Inspection in England and Scotland’ Swiss Journal of Sociology 39(2) 205-224.
  • Ozga J (2013) ‘Accountability as a Policy Technology: accounting for education performance in Europe’ International Review of Administrative Science 79 (2) 292-309.
  • Grek, S Lawn, M Ozga, J and Segerholm, C (2013) ‘Governing by Inspection? European Inspectorates and the creation of a European Education Policy Space Comparative Education, 49 (4) 486-502
  • Grek S and Ozga J (2012) Governing through Learning: School Self-Evaluation as a Knowledge-based Regulatory Tool. Recherches sociologiques et anthropologiqes 2012/2 83-103
  • Ozga J (2012) ‘Governing knowledge: data, inspection and education policy in Europe’ Globalisation, Societies and Education
  • Ozga J (2011) Knowledge Stocks and Flows: Data and Education Governance in Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities (Eds) Tara Fenwick and Lesley Farrell, London Routledge
  • Ozga J (2011) Governing Narratives: ‘local’ meanings and globalising education policy Education Inquiry 2 (2) June pp 305-318
  • Ozga J (2011) ‘Knowledge Transfer and Transformation: moving knowledge from research to policy’  PERSPECTIVA, Florianópolis, v. 29, n. 1, 49-67, jan./jun. 2011
  • Ozga J (2011) Researching the Powerful: Seeking Knowledge about Policy European Educational Research Journal Volume 10 Number 2 2011 pp 218-224
  • Arnott, M.A. & Ozga, J. (2010) ‘Nationalism, Governance and Policy Making: The SNP in Power’ Public Money and Management, vol.30 no.2 pp.91-97
  • Arnott, M. and Ozga J. (2010) Education and Nationalism: the discourse of education policy in Scotland Discourse 31(3 ) 335-350
  • Grek S and Ozga J (2010) Governing Education through Data: Scotland, England and the European Education Policy Space British Education Research Journal 36 (6) 937-952
  • Grek, S. and Ozga, J. (2010) ‘Re-inventing Public Education: the new role of knowledge in education policy-making’, Public Policy and Administration 25 (3) 271-288
  • Ozga, J. (2009) Governing Education through Data in England: From Regulation to Self-Evaluation, Special Issue of Journal of Education Policy, 24(2) 149-163
  • Grek, S.,Lawn M, Lingard, B Ozga, J. Rinne, R., Segerholm, C.and Simola, H. (2009) ‘National policy brokering and the construction of the European Education Space in England, Sweden, Finland and Scotland’  Comparative Education 45(1) 5-22
  • Ozga J (2008) Governing Knowledge: research steering and research quality, European  Educational Research Journal, 7(3), pp.261-272.
  • Byrne D and Ozga J (2008) Education Research and Policy Research Papers in Education, 23(4), pp.377-407
  • Ozga, J (2007) Knowledge and Policy: Research and Knowledge Transfer Critical Studies in Education 48 (1) pp63-78
Recent book chapters
  • Ozga, Jenny (2020) Elites and Expertise: The Changing Material Production of Knowledge for Policy in Fan, Guorui and Popkewitz, Thomas (Eds.) Handbook of Education Policy Studies volume 1 Values, Governance, Globalization, and Methodology (https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9789811383465)
  • Ozga, J (2019) ‘Governing and Knowledge: Theorising the Relationship’ in Langer, R and Brusemeister, T Handbuch Educational Governance Theorien Springer
  • Ozga J (2017) ‘Education and Nationalism in Scotland: nationalism as a governing resource’ in Kantasalmi, K and Holm, G (eds) The State, Schooling and Identity Singapore, Palgrave Macmillan/Springer
  • Ozga, Jenny (2015) Working Knowledge: Data, Expertise and Inspection in the Governing of Education in Kotthoff H-G and Klerides, E (eds) Governing Educational Spaces Knowledge, Teaching, and Learning in Transition Rotterdam, Sense Publishers  pp 15-35 https://www.sensepublishers.com/media/2526-governing-educational-spaces.pdf
  • Ozga J and Dubois-Shaik F (2015) ‘Referencing Europe:usages  of Europe in National Identity Projects’ in Carter, C and Lawn, M (eds) Governing Europe’s Spaces: European Union Re-imagined Manchester, Manchester University Press
  • Ozga J and Segerholm C (2015) Neo-Liberal Agendas in Education in Grek, S and Lindgren, J (eds) Governing by Inspection Routledge pp27-38
  • Ozga J, Lawn M (2015) The History and Development of Inspectorates in England, Sweden and Scotland in Grek, S and Lindgren, J (eds) Governing by Inspection Routledge pp58-74
  • Lawn M and Ozga J (2012) Making Good Progress? Governing by Inspection: a post-comparative approach. Helsinki, Finnish Education Research Association.
  • Arnott M and Ozga J  (2012) ‘Education, Nationalism and Social Justice in Scott, G. & Mooney, G. (eds) Social Justice and Social Policy: the Politics of Social Policy in Scotland, Bristol, Policy Press
  • Ozga J (2012) ‘Trans-national Technologies and National Contexts: a Comparative Analysis of Education Policy in Scotland and England’ in Kauko, J Rinne R & Kynkäänniemi H (eds) Restructuring the Truth of Schooling – Essays on Discursive Practices in Sociology and the Politics of Education Helsinki, Finnish Educational Research Association
  • Arnott m and Ozga J (2010) ‘Education Policy & the SNP Government’ in Scott, G. & Mooney, G. (eds) (2010) Politics of Social Policy in Scotland, Policy Press

Ian is former President of BERA, 2013-2015. At OUDE he was Director of Professional Programmes and led the development of the Oxford Education Deanery.Before moving to Oxford, Ian was Professor of Teacher Education at the University of Glasgow. Prior to that he held posts at the University of the West of Scotland (Dean of Education and Media), London Metropolitan University (Head of School of Education), University of the West of England and the University of Gloucestershire.

Ian was President of the Scottish Educational Research Association from 2005–07 and chaired the Research and Development Committee of the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers from 2008-11. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts and is a Visiting Professor at Bath Spa University and Ulster University and an Honorary Professor at the University of Exeter. Since 2018 he has been a Senior Research Associate at Kazan Federal University, Russia.

Publications
Books
  • Menter, I., Muschamp, Y., Nicholls, P., Ozga, J. with Pollard, A. (1997) Work and Identity in the Primary School: A Post-Fordist Analysis Buckingham: Open University Press
  • Menter, I., Brisard, E. and Smith, I. (2006) Convergence or Divergence?: Initial teacher education in Scotland and England Edinburgh: Dunedin Academic Press.
  • Menter, I. and Murray, J. (eds.) (2011) Developing Research in Teacher Education, London: Routledge.
  • Menter, I., Elliot, D., Hulme, M., Lewin, J. and Lowden, K. (2011) A Guide to Practitioner Research in Education, London: Sage.
  • The Teacher Education Group (2015) Teacher Education in Times of Change. Bristol: Policy Press.
  • Peters, M., Cowie, B and Menter, I. (eds.) (2017) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education Research. Singapore: Springer.
  • Childs, A. and Menter, I. (eds.) (2018) Mobilising Teacher Researchers: challenging educational inequality. London: Routledge
  • Tatto, M.T. and Menter, I. (eds.) (2019) Knowledge, Policy and Practice in Teacher Education – A Cross-National Study. London: Bloomsbury.
Recent research reports
  • 2009 Final Report Curriculum for Excellence Draft Experiences and Outcomes: Collection, analysis and reporting of data for Learning and Teaching Scotland (Menter, I., Baumfield, V., Hulme, M., Devlin, A., Ellott, D., Hall, J., Hall, S. and Lowden, K.)
  • 2010 ‘Teachers: formation, training and identity’ (A literature review for Culture, Creativity and Education) (Menter, I.)
  • 2010 Literature Review on Teacher Education in the 21stCentury, Edinburgh: The Scottish Government. (Menter, I.,Hulme, M., Elliot, D. and Lewin, J.)
  • 2010 Research to support Schools of Ambition: Final Report, Edinburgh: The Scottish Government (Menter, I., Hulme, M., Christie, D., Payne, F., Coutts, N., Robson, D. and Spratt, J.)
  • 2011 Research to support Schools of Ambition: Final Report, Edinburgh: The Scottish Government (Menter, I., Hulme, M., Christie, D., Payne, F., Coutts, N., Robson, D. and Spratt, J.)
  • 2011 The Glasgow West Teacher Education Initiative: A Clinical Approach to Teacher Education. Evaluation Report. (Menter. I., Baumfield, V., Carroll, M., Dickson, B., Hulme, M., Lowden, K. and Mallon, W.) University of Glasgow.
  • 2012 The Glasgow West Teacher Education Initiative: Evaluation of second phase. Menter, I. and Lowden, K. Glasgow: The University of Glasgow.
  • 2013 Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools, funded by Citi Foundation (Aexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. and Menter, I.)
  • 2017 The role and contribution of higher education in contemporary teacher education. (Menter, I.) Commissioned by the Scottish Council of Deans of Education.
Recent book chapters
  • Menter, I. (2016) Teacher education – making connections with curriculum, pedagogy and assessment. In: Wyse, D., Hayward, L. and Pandya, J. (Eds.) The Sage Handbook of Curriculum, Pedagogy and Assessment. London: SAGE. pp 1015-1028.
  • Menter, I. (2016) ‘Foreword’ to Beckett, L. Teachers and Academic Partners in Urban Schools. London: Routledge.
  • Menter, I. and Walker, M. (2016) ‘School and society’ in Wyse, D. and Rogers, S. (Eds.) A Guide to Early Years and Primary Teaching. London: Sage.
  • Menter, I. (2016) Teacher education: generator of change or a mechanism for conformity? in Lees, H. and Noddings, N. (eds.) The Palgrave International Handbook of Alternative Education. London: Palgrave. 257-272.
  • Menter, I. (2017) ‘Reasons for education research’. In Wyse, D., Selwyn, N., Smith, E. and Suter, L. (Eds.) The BERA/SAGE Handbook of Educational Research. London: Sage. pp. 37-52.
  • Menter, I. (2017) ‘Diversity, development, devolution: the three Ds of UK teacher education and professional development in the twenty-first century’. In Florian, L. and Pantic, N. (Eds.) Teacher Education for the Changing Demographics of Schooling – Issues for research and practice. Cham, Switzerland: Springer. pp39-51.
  • Menter, I. (2017) ‘Teacher Education Research’ In Oxford Encyclopedia of Education. Oxford University Press. DOI: 10.1093/acrefore/9780190264093.013.275
  • Menter, I. (2018) ‘Teacher education in a crucible of change’ in Smith, L. and Wyatt, C. (Eds.) Innovation and Accountability in Teacher Education: Setting directions for new cultures in teacher education. Singapore: Springer. pp313-326.
  • Menter, I. and Reynolds, K. (2019) ‘Diversity in Teacher Education: Afterword’ In Sorensen, N. (Ed.) Diversity in Teacher Education. London: UCL IoE Books.
Recent journal articles
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. and Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: The Development of the Oxford Education Deanery Narrative. Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373.
  • Menter, I. (2015) Unity or disunity in the United Kingdom? Policy and practice in teacher education. Education and Self-Development. 2 (44),156-164.
  • Thompson, I., McNicholl, J. and Menter, I. (2016) Student teachers’ perceptions of poverty and educational achievement, Oxford Review of Education 42, 2, 214-229 DOI: 10.1080/03054985.2016.1164130
  • Menter, I. (2016) Helga Eng lecture 2015: What is a teacher in the 21st century and what does a 21st century teacher need to know? Acta Didactica Norge,10, 2, 11-25.
  • Lynch, D., Smith, R. and Menter, I. (2016) Reforming teacher education: from partnership to ‘syndication’. International Journal of Innovation, Creativity and Change. www.ijicc.net Volume 2, Issue 3.
  • Mutton, T., Burn, K. and Menter, I. (2017) Deconstructing the Carter Review: Competing conceptions of quality in England’s ‘school-led’ system of initial teacher education. Journal of Education Policy. 32, 1, 14-33. DOI: 10.1080/02680939.2016.1214751
  • Menter, I. (2017) Competences and Standards for Teachers and Teacher Education – Developments and Problems – a common approach for the United Kingdom? 26th Bulletin of the Japanese Society for the Study of Teacher Education. 8-19.
  • Menter, I., Valeeva, R. and Kalimullin, A. (2017) A tale of two countries – forty years on: politics and teacher education in Russia and England. European Journal of Teacher Education. 40, 5, 616-629.
  • Whiting, C., Whitty, G., Menter, I., Black, P., Hordern, J., Parfitt, A., Reynolds, K. and Sorenson, N. (2018) Diversity and Complexity: Becoming a teacher in England in 2015-16. Review of Education 6, 1, 69-96.
  • Menter, I. (2018) Defining teachers’ professional knowledge: the interaction of global and national influences. Education and Self-Development.13, 1, 32-42.
  • Loughran, J. and Menter, I. (2019) The essence of being a teacher educator and why it matters, Asia-Pacific Journal of Teacher Education, DOI:10.1080/1359866X.2019.1575946
Research and professional activity

Ian’s research interests are in teacher education and teachers’ work, with a particular interest in policy. He has carried out a number of ‘home international’ comparative studies within the UK, including ESRC-sponsored initiatives and has led projects commissioned by the Scottish Government and The National College for School Leadership. He led a research support team from OUDE working on the National College for Teaching and Leadership project, Closing the Gap – Test and Learn. He was also Director of the Oxford City Council funded Leadership for Learning project, working in city primary schools.

Ian is a founding editor of Review of Education, a journal of the British Educational Research Association, launched in 2013. He is series editor for Critical Guides for Teacher Educators, published by Critical Publishing. He is a founder member of two UK-wide research groups, TEG (Teacher Education Group) and CAPeR-UK (Curricululum, Assessment and Pedagogy Reform across the UK), as well as the OUDE –led research group on Poverty and Teacher Education. He was also a member of the steering group for the BERA-RSA Inquiry into Research and Teacher Education.

Ken Mayhew is Emeritus Professor of Education and Economic Performance and Emeritus Fellow of Pembroke College, Oxford.

He is an Extraordinary Professor at Maastricht University, a Director of the Centre for Tutorial Teaching and has recently finished a term as a member of the Department for Education’s Skills and Productivity Board. He was the founding Director of SKOPE, a multi-disciplinary centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, based in the Oxford Department of Education.
Ken is also currently a member of the ESRC’s College of Peer Reviewers; the Expert Group for CEDEFOP’s European Training and Learning Survey; the Expert Working Group for Cedefop’s Second European Skills and Jobs Survey; Bright Blue’s Commission on the Welfare System after the COVID 19 Pandemic. He is an editor of Oxford Economic Papers

Ken obtained a First in Modern History at Worcester College, Oxford and took a Masters in Economics at LSE. After graduate school he joined Her Majesty’s Treasury before moving to Oxford. In 1989 and 1990 he was Economic Director at the UK National Economic Development Office, and has worked as a consultant for many private and public sector organisations at home and abroad. In the UK these include the Department of Education and Skills, the Department of Trade and Industry, DEFRA, the Skills Funding Agency, the CIPD and the Confederation of British Industry. Abroad they include the EU, the Polish, Belgian and Omani Governments, SIK (Sweden) and Group Training Australia. He was on the Academic Advisory Board of the National Skills Taskforce and Chair of an expert group advising the OECD on the background questionnaire for PIAAC. His major research interests are in labour economics, human resource management and the economics of education and training. He has published widely in these areas.

Ken Mayhew would welcome informal contacts from prospective students interested in the following topics:

• The economics of education
• Transitions from the education system to the labour market
• Work-based training and learning
• Education and social mobility
• The labour market

Research

Ken’s current research is mainly in six areas: transitions from education into the labour market; the economics of work-based training; the economics of higher education; low paid work in the UK and Europe; the labour market as a social model; inequality with special emphasis on regional inequality.

Featured publications
  •  Oxford Handbook of Skills and Training, Oxford University Press, 2017 (with J. Buchanan, D. Finegold and C. Warhurst)
  • “Educating for a cooperative society –building human and social capital: the role of government” in G. Redding, A. Drew and S. Crump (eds), The Oxford Handbook of Higher Education Systems and University Management, 2019
  • “Inequality”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 2019 (with S. Wills)
  • Holmes, C, Mayhew, K (2016) “The economics of higher education”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 32(4) 475-496.
  • Mayhew, K, Holmes, C (2015) Over-qualification and skills mismatch in the graduate labour market. London: CIPD.
  • Mayhew, K (2015) “UK labour market policy then and now”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy.
  • “BREXIT and higher education” (2022) Oxford Review of Economic Policy
  • “What accounts for changes in the chances of being NEET in the UK?” (2021) Journal of Education and Work (with C. Holmes and E. Murphy)
  • Higher education and the labour market” (2020) Oxford Review of Education (with H. Lauder)
Books
  • Oxford Handbook of Skills and Training, Oxford University Press, paperback edition 2018 (with J. Buchanan, D. Finegold and C. Warhurst)
  • Oxford Handbook of Skills and Training, Oxford University Press, 2017 (with J. Buchanan, D. Finegold and C. Warhurst)
  • Appelbaum, E, Bosch, G, Gautié, J, Mason, G, Mayhew, K, Salverda, W, Schmitt, J, Westergaard-Nielsen, N (2010) Introduction and overview.
  • LLoyd, C, Mason, G, Mayhew, K (2008) Low-Wage Work in the United Kingdom. Russell Sage Foundation.
  • Grip, AD, Loo, JV, Mayhew, K (2002) The Economics of Skills Obsolescence Theoretical Innovations and Empirical Applications. Jai.
  • Mayhew, K, Fenn, P, McGuire, A (1994) Providing Health Care. Oxford: OUP.
  • Mayhew, K, Layard, R, Owen, G (1994) Britain’s Training Deficit. Avebury Publishing.
  • Bowen, A, Mayhew, K (1991) Reducing Regional Inequalities.
  • Fenn, P, McGuire, A, Mayhew, K (1991) Providing Health Care. Oxford: OUP.
  • Bowen, A, Mayhew, K (1990) Improving Incentives for the Low-Paid. Springer.
  • Mayhew, K (1983) Trade Unions and the Labour Market. Blackwell Pub.
  • Robinson, DJS, Mayhew, K (1983) Pay policies for the future.
Book chapters
  • “NEETS in England”, in M. Levels, C. Brzinsky-Fay, C. Holmes and J. Jongbloed (eds), The Dynamics of Marginalised Youth, Routledge, 2022 (with C. Holmes, L. Wright, E. Murphy, E. Keep and S. Maguire)
  • “Derek Robinson” in R. Cord (ed), The Palgrave Companion to Oxford Economics, Palgrave, 2021
  • “What, if anything, can we learn from Germany, Switzerland, Austria, the Netherlands and Denmark?”, in D. Goodhart (ed.), The Training We Need Now, Policy Exchange, 2020
  • “Educating for a cooperative society –building human and social capital: the role of government” in G. Redding, A. Drew and S. Crump (eds), The Oxford Handbook of Higher Education Systems and University Management, 2019
  • “The economic and social benefits of skills” in Oxford Handbook of Skills and Training, 2017 (with I Grugulis and C. Holmes)
  • “Skills and training: the landscape” in Oxford Handbook of Skills and Training, 2017 (with J. Buchanan, D. Finegold and C. Warhurst)
  • Mayhew, K, Wickham-Jones, M (2014) “The UK’s Social Model from New Deal to Economic Crisis”, In: J-E Dolvik, A Martin (eds.) European Social Models from Crisis to Crisis: Employment and Inequality in an Era of Monetary Integration.Oxford: OUP.
  • Holmes, C, Mayhew, K (2014) “The winners and losers in the ‘hourglass’ labour market”, In: Understanding Employer Engagement in Education: Theories and Evidence. 92-113
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.4324/9781315779966
  • Mayhew, K (2010) “Comment on Anderson and Ruhs”, In: B Anderson, M Ruhs (eds.) Who Needs Migrant Workers: Labour Shortages, Immigration and Public Policy.
  • Gautié, J, Westergaard-Nielsen, N, Schmitt, J, Mayhew, K (2010) “The impact of institutions on the supply side of the low-wage labor market”, In: Low-Wage Work in the Wealthy World. 147-182
  • Bosch, G, Mayhew, K, Gautié, J (2010) “Industrial relations, legal regulations, and wage setting”, In: Low-Wage Work in the Wealthy World. 91-146
  • Mayhew, K, Keep, E (2009) “Knowledge, skills and competitiveness”, In: F Rauner, R Maclean (eds.) Handbook of TVET Research.
  • Mayhew, K, Mason, G, Osborne, M, Stevens, P (2008) “Low pay, labour market institutions and job quality”, In: C Lloyd, G Mason, K Mayhew (eds.) Low Wage Work in the UK. New York: Russell Sage.
  • Mayhew, K, Mason, G (2008) “Low paid work in the UK: an overview”, In: C Lloyd, G Mason, K Mayhew (eds.) Low Wage Work in the UK. New York: Russell Sage.
  • Mayhew, K, Deer, C (2007) “The changing nature and context of higher education in the UK”, In: T Butler, M Dane (eds.) Reflections on Change.
  • Mayhew, K (2005) How to improve the human capital of older workers. Paris: OECD.
  • Mayhew, K, de Grip, A, van Loo, J (2002) “The economics of skills obsolescence”, In: A de Grip, J van Loo, K Mayhew (eds.) The Economics of Skills Obsolescence: Theoretical Innovations and Empirical Applications. Jai.
  • Mayhew, K (2002) “The high skills vision”, In: A Jolly (ed.) Skills and Training Directory. Kogan Page.
  • Mayhew, K (2002) “Higher education – size matters”, In: G Hayward, S James (eds.) Growing Higher Education: Expansion or Hyperinflation.
  • Mayhew, K, Holtham, G, Ingram, P (1998) “The long term unemployed – what more can be done?”, In:J McCormick, C Oppenheim (eds.) Welfare in Working Order. London: IPPR.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1998) “Vocational Education and Training and Economic Performance”, In: T Buxton, P Chapman, J Temple (eds.) Britain’s Economic Performance. 2nd edition. London: Routledge. 367-395
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1998) “Training and Development”, In: S Fox (ed.) The European business environment UK. London: Thomson Business Press. 219-241
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1996) “UK Training Policy – Assumptions and Reality”, In: A Booth, DJ Snower (eds.) Acquiring Skills Market Failures, Their Symptoms and Policy Responses. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 303-334
  • Mayhew, K, Ingram, P, Guest, D (1996) “How do we think about pay?”, In: H Murlis (ed.) Pay at the Crossroads. London: IPD.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1996) “Training for the Unemployed”, In: P Meadows (ed.) Work out – or Work in? Contributions to the debate on the future of work. York: Joseph Rowntree Foundation. 140-155
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1995) “The Economic Demand for Higher Education, and Investing in People – Two Aspects of Sustainable Development in British Higher Education”, In: F Coffield (ed.) Higher Education in a Learning Society. Durham: Durham University School of Education. 81-110
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1995) Training Policy for Competitiveness – Time for a Fresh Perspective? London: Policy Studies Institute. 110-145
  • Mayhew, K, Layard, R, Owen, G (1994) “Why we need a Training Reform Act”, In: K Mayhew, R Layard, G Owen (eds.) Britain’s Training Deficit. Avebury.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1994) “The Changing Structure of Training Provision”, In: T Buxton, P Chapman, P Temple (eds.) Britain’s Economic Performance. London: Routledge.
  • Mayhew, K, Anderton, R (1994) “A comparative analysis of the UK labour market”, In: R Barrell (ed.) The UK Labour Market: Comparative Aspects and Institutional Developments. Cambridge University Press.
  • Mayhew, K (1994) “Pay policies in the private sector: an international overview”, In: M Lavender (ed.) International Pay Policies. London: Public Finance Foundation.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1993) “Training and the Labour Market”, In: C Trinder, P Jackson (eds.) The Public Services Yearbook 1993. London: Chapman and Hall. 169-190
  • Mayhew, K (1992) “Incomes policy”, In: New Palgrave Dictionary of Money and Finance. Palgrave.
  • Mayhew, K (1991) “Pay policies in the private sector: an international overview”, In: J Hawkins (ed.) International Pay Policies. London: Public Finance Foundation.
  • Mayhew, K, McGuire, A, Fenn, P (1991) “The economics of health care”, In: K Mayhew, A McGuire, P Fenn (eds.) Providing Health Care. Oxford: OUP.
  • Mayhew, K, Bowen, A (1991) “Regional economic disparities: some public policy issues”, In: K Mayhew, A Bowen (eds.) Reducing Regional Inequalities.
  • Mayhew, K (1991) “Training: the way ahead”, In: Employment Institute (ed.) Improving Britain’s Industrial Performance. Employment Institute.
  • Mayhew, K (1991) “Regional issues in economics: setting the scene”, In: K Mayhew, A Bowen (eds.) Reducing Regional Inequalities.
  • Keep, EJ (1990) “Training for the Low Paid”, In: A Bowen, K Mayhew (eds.) Improving Incentives for the Low-Paid. London: Macmillan/NEDO. 139-180
  • Mayhew, K, Ray, A (1990) “White collar pay and employment”, In: M Gregory, A Thompson (eds.) A Portrait of Pay. OUP.
  • Mayhew, K, Bowen, A (1990) “Incentives for the low paid: issues for public policy”, In: K Mayhew, A Bowen (eds.) Improving Incentives for the Low Paid.
  • Mayhew, K, Bowen, A, Brewer, D (1990) “Incentives for the low paid: setting the scene”, In: K Mayhew, A Bowen (eds.) Improving Incentives for the Low Paid.
  • Mayhew, K, Turnbull, P (1989) “Models of union behaviour”, In: R Perlman, R Drago (eds.) Microeconomic Issues in the Labour Market. Harvester.
  • Mayhew, K (1986) “Economists and immigration”, In: A Dummett (ed.) Towards a Just Immigration Policy.
  • Mayhew, K (1986) “Employee behaviour”, In: D Morris (ed.) The Economic System in the UK. OUP.
  • Mayhew, K, Addison, J (1983) “Discrimination in the labour market”, In: G Bain (ed.) Industrial relations in Britain. Blackwell.
  • Mayhew, K (1983) “Traditional incomes policies”, In: D Robinson, K Mayhew (eds.) Pay Policies for the Future.
  • Mayhew, K, Greenhalgh, C (1981) “Labour supply in Great Britain: theory and evidence”, In: Z Hornstein, J Grice (eds.) The Economics of the Labour Market. HMSO.
  • Mayhew, K (1981) “Incomes policy and the private sector”, In: R Elliott, L Fallick (eds.) Incomes Policy, Inflation and Relative Pay. George Allen and Unwin.
  • Mayhew, K (1981) “The institutional context of incomes policy”, In: R Chater, A Dean, R Elliott (eds.) Incomes Policies. OUP.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K “Education and Training”, In: C Trinder, P Jackson (eds.) Public Services Yearbook 1994. London: Chapman and Hall. 237-254
Conference papers
Journal articles
  • “BREXIT and UK higher education”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 2022
  • “Kurzarbeit/short time working: experiences and lessons from the COVID-induced downturn”, National Institute Economic Review, 2022 (with B. Casey)
  • “What accounts for changes in the chances of being NEET in the UK?”, Journal of Education and Work, 2021 (with C. Holmes and E. Murphy)
  • “Regional inequalities: causes and cures”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 2021 (with F. Corvers)
  • “COVID 19 and the labour market”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 2020 (with P. Anand)
  • “Higher education and the labour market”, Oxford Review of Education, 2020 (with H. Lauder)
  • Inequality”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 2019 (with S. Wills)
  • Mayhew, K (2017) “UK higher education and Brexit”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 33(1) S155-S161.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grx012
  • Mayhew, K (2016) “Human Capital, Growth and Inequality”, Welsh Economic Review. 24(0) 23-23.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.18573/j.2016.10052
  • Holmes, C, Mayhew, K (2016) “The economics of higher education”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 32(4) 475-496.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grw031
  • Mayhew, K (2015) “Derek Robinson (9 February 1932-1 September 2014)”, ECONOMIC AND LABOUR RELATIONS REVIEW.26(3) 490-492.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/1035304615597839
  • Laczik, A, Mayhew, K (2015) “Labour market developments and their significance for VET in England: Current concerns and debates”, Research in Comparative and International Education. 10(4) 558-575.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/1745499915615974
  • Mayhew, K (2015) “UK labour market policy then and now”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 31(2) 199-216.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grv017
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K (2014) “Inequality – ‘wicked problems’, labour market outcomes and the search for silver bullets”, OXFORD REVIEW OF EDUCATION. 40(6) 764-781.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/03054985.2014.979580
  • Mayhew, K (2013) “Government and business: an introduction”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 29(2) 249-260.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grt028
  • Cobham, D, Adam, C, Mayhew, K (2013) “The economic record of the 1997-2010 Labour government: an assessment”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 29(1) 1-24.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grt014
  • Amable, B, Mayhew, K (2011) “Unemployment in the OECD”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 27(2) 207-220.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grr019
  • Lloyd, C, Mayhew, K (2010) “Skill: the solution to low wage work?”, Industrial Relations Journal. 41(5) 429-445.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2338.2010.00578.x
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K (2010) “Moving beyond skills as a social and economic panacea”, WORK EMPLOYMENT AND SOCIETY. 24(3) 565-577.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0950017010371663
  • Salverda, W, Mayhew, K (2009) “Capitalist economies and wage inequality”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 25(1) 126-154.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grp008
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K, Payne, J (2006) “From skills revolution to productivity miracle – Not as easy as it sounds?”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 22(4) 539-559.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grj032
  • Mayhew, K, Neely, A (2006) “Improving productivity – Opening the black box”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 22(4) 445-456.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grj026
  • Mayhew, K, Deer, C, Dua, M (2004) “The move to mass higher education in the UK: many questions and some answers”, OXFORD REVIEW OF EDUCATION. 30(1) 65-82.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/0305498042000190069
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K (2004) “The economic and distributional implications of current policies on higher education”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 20(2) 298-314.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grh017
  • Gold, M, Charlwood, A, Müller-Camen, M, Lucas, R, Crowley, S, Heery, E, Benson, J, Mayhew, K, Bach, S, Moore, S, Finkin, M, Rowlinson, M, Beauregard, A (2002) “Book Reviews”, British Journal of Industrial Relations. 40 341-368.
  • Mayhew, K (2002) “The state of working Britain”, BRITISH JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS. 40(2) 355-357.
    Borghans, L, Green, F, Mayhew, K (2001) “Skills measurement and economic analysis: An introduction”, OXFORD ECONOMIC PAPERS-NEW SERIES. 53(3) 375-384.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oep/53.3.375
  • Mayhew, K (2000) “The assessment: Labour markets and welfare”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 16(1) 1-12.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/16.1.1
  • Felstead, A, Green, F, Pack, A, Mayhew, K (2000) “The Impact of Training on Labour”, British Journal of Industrial Relations. 38(2)
  • Green, F, Felstead, A, Mayhew, K, Pack, A (2000) “The impact of training on labour mobility: Individual and firm-level evidence from Britain”, BRITISH JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS. 38(2) 261-275.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/1467-8543.00162
  • Felstead, A, Green, F, Mayhew, K (1999) “Britain’s training statistics: A cautionary tale”, WORK EMPLOYMENT AND SOCIETY. 13(1) 107-115.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1017/S0950017099000070
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K (1999) “The assessment: Knowledge, skills, and competitiveness”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 15(1) 1-15.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/15.1.1
  • Mayhem, K (1997) “The Education and Training Mismatch”, Business Strategy Review. 8(2) 51-53.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/1467-8616.00022
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K (1996) “Towards a learning society — Definition and measurement”, Policy Studies. 17(3) 215-232.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/01442879608423708
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K (1996) “Economic Demand for Higher Education? A Sound Foundation for Further Expansion?”, Higher Education Quarterly. 50(2) 89-109.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2273.1996.tb01693.x
  • MAYHEW, K, SEABRIGHT, P (1992) “INCENTIVES AND THE MANAGEMENT OF ENTERPRISES IN ECONOMIC TRANSITION: CAPITAL MARKETS ARE NOT ENOUGH”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy. 8(1) 105-129.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/8.1.105
  • HELM, D, MAYER, C, MAYHEW, K (1991) “THE ASSESSMENT – MICROECONOMIC POLICY IN THE 1980S”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 7(3) 1-12.
  • MAYHEW, K (1991) “THE ECONOMICS OF HUMAN – RESOURCE MANAGEMENT – MITCHELL, DJB, ZAIDI, MA”, BRITISH JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS. 29(3) 534-535.
  • MAYHEW, K (1991) “THE ASSESSMENT – THE UK LABOR-MARKET IN THE 1980S”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 7(1) 1-17.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/7.1.1
  • McGUIRE, A, FENN, P, MAYHEW, K (1989) “THE ASSESSMENT: THE ECONOMICS OF HEALTH CARE”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy. 5(1) 1-20.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/5.1.1
  • KEEP, E, MAYHEW, E (1988) “THE ASSESSMENT: EDUCATION, TRAINING AND ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy. 4(3) 1-1.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/4.3.1-a
  • KNIGHT, JB, MAYHEW, K (1987) “WAGE DETERMINATION AND LABOR-MARKET INFLEXIBILITY – INTRODUCTION”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 49(1) 1-8.
  • MAYHEW, K (1986) “WAGE RESTRAINT BY CONSENSUS – BRITAIN SEARCH FOR AN INCOMES-POLICY AGREEMENT 1965-79 – FISHBEIN, WH”, JOURNAL OF ECONOMIC LITERATURE. 24(2) 694-695.
  • Mayhew, K (1985) “Reforming the labour market”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy. 1(2) 60-79.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/1.2.60
  • MAYHEW, K (1985) “ECONOMICS OF UNEMPLOYMENT – AN HISTORICAL-PERSPECTIVE – CASSON, M”, INDUSTRIAL & LABOR RELATIONS REVIEW. 38(4) 667-668.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.2307/2524010
  • ROBINSON, D, MAYHEW, K (1983) “SPECIAL ISSUE – PAY POLICIES FOR THE FUTURE – INTRODUCTION”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 45(1) 3-13.
  • MAYHEW, K (1983) “FAIRNESS, COLLECTIVE-BARGAINING, AND INCOMES-POLICY – WILLMAN, P”, MANCHESTER SCHOOL OF ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL STUDIES. 51(1) 105-106.
  • MAYHEW, K (1983) “TRADITIONAL INCOMES POLICIES”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 45(1) 15-32.
    ROBINSON, D, MAYHEW, K (1983) “SPECIAL ISSUE – PAY POLICIES FOR THE FUTURE – CONCLUSIONS”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 45(1) 127-139.
  • MAYHEW, K, ROSEWELL, B (1981) “OCCUPATIONAL-MOBILITY IN BRITAIN”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 43(3) 225-255.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1981.mp43003001.x
  • MAYHEW, K, ROSEWELL, B (1979) “LABOR-MARKET SEGMENTATION IN BRITAIN”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 41(2) 81-115.
  • MAYHEW, K (1979) “ECONOMISTS AND STRIKES”,OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 41(1) 1-19.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1979.mp41001001.x
  • MAYHEW, K, ROSEWELL, B (1978) “IMMIGRANTS AND OCCUPATIONAL CROWDING IN GREAT-BRITAIN”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 40(3) 223-248.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1978.mp40003003.x
  • MAYHEW, K (1977) “DEGREE OF UNIONIZATION 1948-68 – COMMENT”, BULLETIN OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH. 29(1) 51-53.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8586.1977.tb00409.x
  • MAYHEW, K (1977) “EARNINGS DISPERSION IN LOCAL LABOR-MARKETS – IMPLICATIONS FOR SEARCH BEHAVIOR”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 39(2) 93-107.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1977.mp39002001.x
  • MAYHEW, K (1976) “REGIONAL VARIATIONS OF MANUAL EARNINGS IN ENGINEERING”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 38(1) 11-25.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1976.mp38001002.x
  • MAYHEW, K (1976) “PLANT SIZE AND EARNINGS OF MANUAL WORKERS IN ENGINEERING”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 38(3) 149-160.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1976.mp38003001.x
  • MAYHEW, K (1975) “REVERSAL OF SKILL DIFFERENTIALS UNDER PAYMENT BY RESULTS SYSTEMS CASE OF ENGINEERING”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 37(4) 251-267.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1975.mp37004001.x
  • Mayhew, K “The resurgence of incomes policy”, Manpower Policy and Practice.
  • Mayhew, K, Rijkers, B “Improving the human capital of older workers”, Ageing Horizons.
  • Mayhew, K, Felstead, A, Green, F “Interpreting training statistics in Europe: issuing a health warning”, European Journal for Vocational Training.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K “Towards the knowledge-driven economy”, 7(4) 50-59.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K “Was Ratner Right? Product Market and Competitive Strategies and Their Links with Skills and Knowledge”, EPI Economic Report. 12(3) 1-14.
  • Mayhew, K “The Assessment: Labour Markets and Welfare”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Vol. 16.(1)
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/16.1.1
Reports
  • Alternative Pathways into the Labour Market, CIPD, 2016 (with Craig Holmes)
  • Wilde, S, James, SF, Mayhew, K (2015) Training Managers: Benefits from and barriers to WorldSkills UK participation. Oxford: Oxford University Consulting.
  • Mayhew, K, Holmes, C (2015) Over-qualification and skills mismatch in the graduate labour market. London: CIPD.
  • James Relly, SF, Holmes, C, Mayhew, K (2015) Learning environments to develop vocational excellence. http://vocationalexcellence.education.ox.ac.uk/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/Project-2-Phase-2-Final-Report-Learning-environments-to-develop-vocational-excellence.pdf:
  • Chankseliani, M, James Relly, S, Mayhew, K (2015) WorldSkills competitors and entrepreneurship: A Report to the Skills Funding Agency.
  • Chankseliani, M, James Relly, Susan, Mayhew, Ken (2015) “Benefits of Developing Vocational Excellence. A Report to the National Apprenticeship Service of Project 3 (Phase II) of the DUVE suite of projects”, In: Benefits of Developing Vocational Excellence. A Report to the National Apprenticeship Service of Project 3 (Phase II) of the DUVE suite of projects.
  • James Relly, SF, Allen, J, Mayhew, K (2015) Further education college participation in worldSkills and other competitions. http://vocationalexcellence.education.ox.ac.uk/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/Project-4-Further-education-college-participation-in-WorldSkills-and-other-skills-competitions.pdf:
  • James Relly, SF, Rodriguez Leal, T, Mayhew, K (2014) Interim Evaluation Report on the Skills Competition CPD Programme. Oxford: Oxford University Consulting.
  • James Relly, SF, Rodriguez Leal, T, Mayhew, K (2014) Final Evaluation Report on the Skills Competition CPD Programme. Oxford: Oxford University Consulting.
  • James, SF, Mayhew, K, Laczik, A, Mordarska, M (2013) Report on Apprenticeships, Employer Engagement and Vocational Formation in England. Oxford: Oxford University Consulting.
  • James, SF, Mayhew, K, Chankseliani, M, Laczik, A (2013) “Benefits of Developing Vocational Excellence. A Report to the National Apprenticeship Service. Oxford: SKOPE”, In: Benefits of Developing Vocational Excellence A Report to the National Apprenticeship Service of Project 3 of the DUVE suite of projects.
  • James, S, Holmes, C, Mayhew, K (2013) “Learning Environments to Develop vocational Excellence. Oxford: SKOPE”, In: A Report to the National Apprenticeship Service of Project 2 of the DUVE suite of projects. Oxford: SKOPE.
  • Mayhew, K, Holmes, C (2012) Is the UK labour market polarising. London: Resolution Foundation.
  • Holmes, C, Mayhew, K, Keep, EJ (2012) “Ten Big Questions for Higher Education”, In: SKOPE Issues Paper. Cardiff: Cardiff University, SKOPE.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (2011) “Future Directions for Skills Policy”, In: SKOPE submission to the Labour Party Policy Review on skills (mimeo). Universities of Oxford and Cardiff, SKOPE.
  • Mayhew, K, Green, F, Stasz, C (2005) Defining a strategy for the direct assessment of adult skills. Copenhagen:Danish Technological Institute.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (2004) Can Employers Be Persuaded That Training Pays? Glasgow: Future Skills Scotland/ScottishEnterprise.
  • Mayhew, K, Wilson, R, Hogarth, T, Keep, E (2003) Tackling the low skills equilibrium. London: Department of Trade and Industry.
  • Mayhew, K, Green, F, Molloy, E (2003) Employer Perspectives on Skill. London: Department for Education and Skills.
  • Mayhew, K, Keep, E, Bosworth, D (2003) Tackling the low skills equilibrium: a review of the issues. Department of Trade and Industry.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K, Corney, M (2002) Review of the evidence on the rate of return to employers of investment in training and employer training measures. Department of Trade and Industry.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (2001) “Globalisation, Models of Competitive Advantage and Skills”, In: SKOPE Research Paper. Coventry: University of Warwick, SKOPE.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (2000) “The Leisure Sector”, In: National Skills Task Force Research Project Report. Sheffield: DfEE.
  • Mayhew, K, Felstead, A, Green, F (1997) Getting the measure of training. Leeds: Centre for Industrial Policy and Performance, Leeds University.
  • Mayhew, K, Holtham, G (1996) Tackling long term unemployment. London: Institute for Public Policy Research.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1994) “UK Training Policy – Assumptions and Reality”, In: Background briefing paper for TUC national conference ‘Looking Forward to Full Employment’. London: TUC.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1994) Scoping paper for the Institute of Personnel Management ‘What Makes Training Pay?’ Project. London: IPM.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1993) Submission on training and skills utilisation to the House of Commons Select Committee on Trade and Industry’s inquiry into the competitiveness of British manufacturing’, June, 1993. (subsequently published in Evidence to the House of Commons Select Committee on Trade and Industry, Trade and Industry Committee 2nd Report ‘Competitiveness of UK Manufacturing Industry’, Vol 2, Memoranda of Evidence. London: HMSO.
  • Layard, R, Mayhew, K, Owen, G (1993) The Training Reform Act of 1994.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1108/01437729310033296
  • Mayhew, K, St John, B (1989) Subcontracting in Britain. London: Confederation of British Industry.
  • Mayhew, K, Rosewell, B (1981) Manpower problems and changes in the labour market. Bradford: MCB Publications.
  • Mayhew, K, Rosewell, B (1980) Employment and Unemployment Issues in the 1970s.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1108/eb001235
  • Mayhew, K, Lall, S (1973) The income and balance of payments effects of private foreign investment in manufacturing: case studies of Colombia and Malaysia. UNCTAD.
Other
  • “BREXIT and UK higher education”, Realites Industrielles, Feb 2021
  • Skills and Skills Mismatch in Food and Drink Manufacturing, a Report for DEFRA, 2020 (with Craig Holmes)
  • “Career choice and a policy dilemma”, CEDEFOP’S Skill Set and Match, November 2018
  • Oman: National Workforce Planning, SKOPE, 2016
  • Mayhew, K (2015) “Derek Robinson”, Royal Economic Society Newsletter.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1999) “Demand and supply”, People Management. 40-42.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1998) “Was Ratner Right”, T-Magazine. 15-17.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1998) “Welfare to Work – some questions ministers must answer”, Parliamentary Brief. 5(3) 18-19.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1996) “What Training Can and Cannot Do for the Jobless”, Parliamentary Brief. 4(4) 43-46.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1994) “Skilling the Jobless: Time for a New Deal”, Employment Policy Institute Economic Report. 8(1) 1-5.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1994) “Skills Cannot Promise a Job”, Parliamentary Brief .3(2) 17-20.

Herb completed a BA (Hons) Psychology at Indiana University in 1968. After that, he achieved an MA at Indiana before moving to UCLA to complete a DPhil in Psychology in 1974.

Shortly after, he was appointed Head of Evaluation Research Services at University of Southern California for 5 years, before moving to Sydney, Australia in 1980 to take a position as Lecturer, and then Senior Lecturer, at Sydney University.

At the same time, he was a Reader in Education. He held these posts until 1990, when he joined the University of Western Sydney. Over the next 15 years at that institution, he served a number of roles, including Research Professor of Education, Professor of Psychology, Dean of Graduate Research Studies, Pro-Vice Chancellor of Research, and Director of Self-concept Enhancement and Learning Facilitation (SELF) Research Centre. Indeed, in 1997 he founded the SELF Research Centre, which now has over 450 members, including many of the top self-concept researchers in the world, and satellite centres at leading Universities in Australia, Europe, North America, and Asia (see http://self.uws.edu.au/). He served as Director of SELF until he departed at the start of 2006 to become a Professor at the University of Oxford.

Herb has supervised scores of Honours-level and Doctoral candidates. Some of his recent PhD supervisions have been in the areas of self-concept theory and intervention, motivation, scale development, bullying, mental toughness in elite athletes, the peer review process, and eating disorders, among others. They generally employ complex quantitative research techniques

Research

Herb Marsh is widely published with 350 articles in more than 70 different journals, 60 chapters, 14 monographs, and 350 conference papers; and co-edits the International Advances in Self Research monograph series. In the most important journals in his disciplines over the last quarter century he is the most frequently published author in American Educational Research Journal (29 articles) and the Journal of Sport & Exercise Psych (21 articles), and second most frequently published author in Journal of Educational Psychology (61 articles). He has a total of 276 journal articles listed in ISI that have been cited a total of more than 11,00 times – including 55 articles with at least 55 citations (ISI H index = 55) and one article with more than 1,100 citations.

He has been recognized as the most productive educational psychologist in the world, as one of the top 10 international researchers in Higher Education and in Social Psychology, and the 11th most productive researcher in the world across all disciplines of psychology. He is a highly cited researcher on ISI’s list of the “world’s most cited and influential scientific authors over a sustained period according to a common standard that covers all countries and all scientific disciplines” (http://isihighlycited.com/), one of only a few UK social science researchers to achieve this recognition and one of the few anywhere to achieve this distinction in two different categories (general social sciences and psychology/psychiatry; presently there is no classification for education).

He has reviewed articles for more than 75 journals and has been on the editorial boards of 14 international journals (J. Ed Psych; Am Ed Res J; Child Devel; Perspectives on Psych Sci; J Pers & Soc Psych; Structural Equation Modelling; Inter J of Sport Psych; Ed & Psych Measurement; J Exp Educ; Educ Res and Eval; J Sport & Exercise Psych; Int J of Sport & Exercise Psych; J of Contemporary Ed Psych; Organizational Res Methods; Multivariate Behavioral Res).

He has served on external advisory committees for the: Scientific Advisory Board of the German Max Planck Institute (Education and Human Development, Berlin); Hong Kong Institute of Educational Research, Chinese University of Hong Kong; Social Sciences and Humanities for the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zürich (Zürich ETH); and the International Research School “The Life Course: Evolutionary and Ontogenetic Dynamics” co-organised by the Univ of Michigan (USA), Univ of Virginia (USA), Humboldt University (Germany), Free University (Germany) and the Max Planck Institute.

Professor Marsh’s research has consistently attracted external funding, including a 100% success record on 24 proposals to the highly competitive Australian Research Council during the last 25 years as well as more recent United Kingdom grants from the Economic and Social Research Council, Higher Education Funding Council for England, and Higher Education Authority.

Other international awards include a Career Achievement Award from the American Educational Research Association, the prestigious Wen Lin Visiting Professorship from The Chinese University of Hong Kong, a visiting travelling fellowship from the British Psychological Society, Fellow of the Australian Academy of Social Sciences and the Society of Multivariate Experimental Psychology, and many keynote presentations at international conferences including the presidential invited keynote addresses for 2007 meetings of both the British Educational Research Association and the American Educational Research Association. In 2008 Professor Marsh was awarded the ESRC Professorial Fellowship which provides professorial salary, support staff and infrastructure for an extended research programme, a highly competitive fellowship awarded to only 3-5 social science researchers across all of the UK.

Major research/scholarly interests

Self-concept and Motivational constructs: Theory, Measurement, Research, Enhancement; Teaching Effectiveness and Its Evaluation: Theory, measurement, research, and enhancement; Higher Education with a particular emphasis on students’ evaluation of teaching and relations between teaching and research; Developmental Psychology; Quantitative analysis, particularly confirmatory factor analysis, structural equation modelling, multilevel modelling; Sports psychology with a particular focus on physical self-concept and motivation; health psychology with a focus on motivational aspects of health related physical activity, physical fitness, and eating disorders; The peer review process in relation to both journals and research grants; Peer support and anti-bullying interventions.

Recent publications (2008 and in press)
Journal articles
  • Cowin, L.S. Johnson, M., Craven, R.G., & Marsh, H.W. (2008) Causal modeling of self-concept, job satisfaction, and retention of nurses International Journal Of Nursing Studies 45, 1449-1459
  • Craven, R. & Marsh, H. W. (2008). The centrality of the self-concept construct for psychological wellbeing and unlocking human potential: Implications for child and educational psychologists Educational & Child Psychology 25, 104-118.
  • Guay, F., Marsh, H. W., Senécal, C. , Dowson, M. (2008). Representations of relatedness with parents and friends and autonomous academic motivation during the late adolescence-early adulthood period: Reciprocal or unidirectional effects? British Journal of Educational Psychology, 78, 621–637
  • Ginns, P., Marsh, H. W., Behnia, M., Cheng, J. H. & Scalas, F. (in press). Using postgraduate students’ evaluations of research experience to benchmark departments and faculties: Issues and challenges British Journal of Educational Psychology
  • Fernet, C., Senécal, C., Guay, F., Marsh, H., & Dowson, M. (2008). The Work Tasks Motivation Scale for Teachers (WTMST) Journal of Career Assessment 16(2), 256-279.
  • Lüdtke, O., Marsh, H. W., Robitzsch, A., Trautwein, U., Asparouhov, T., & Muthén, B. (2008). The multilevel latent covariate model: A new, more reliable approach to group-level effects in contextual studies Psychological Methods 13, 203-229.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2008). The elusive importance effect: More failure for the Jamesian perspective on the importance of importance in shaping self-esteem Journal of Personality 76, 1081-1121.
  • Marsh, H. W., Jayasinghe, U. W., & Bond, N. W. (2008). Improving the peer-review process for grant applications: Reliability, validity and generalization American Psychologist 63, 160-168.
  • Marsh; H., Ludtke, O., Robitzsch, A., Trautwein, U. Latent (in press). Profile Analysis of Academic Self-concept Dimensions: Synergy of Person- and Variable-centered Approaches to the Internal/External Frame of Reference Models Structural Equation Modeling
  • Marsh, H. W., Martin, A. J., & Cheng, J. H. S. (2008). A multilevel perspective on gender in classroom motivation and climate: Potential benefits of male teachers for boys? Journal of Educational Psychology 100, 78-95.
  • Marsh, H. W., & O’Mara, A. (2008). Reciprocal effects between academic self-concept, self-esteem, achievement and attainment over seven adolescent years: Unidimensional and multidimensional perspectives of self-concept  Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin 34, 542-552.
  • Marsh, H. W., O’Mara, A. J. & Malmberg, L. (2008). Meta-Analysis: A three-level multilevel meta-anlaysis.
  • Marsh, H. W., Seaton, M., Trautwein, U., Lüdtke, O., Hau, K. T., O’Mara, A. J., & Craven, R. G. (2008). The big-fish-little-pond-effect stands up to critical scrutiny: Implications for theory, methodology, and future research Educational Psychology Review 20, 319-350.
  • Marsh, H. W., Trautwein, U., Ludtke, O. & Köller, O. (2008). Social comparison and big-fish-little-pond effects on self-concept and other self-belief constructs: Role of generalized and specific others Journal of Educational Psychology 100, 510-524.
  • Martin, A. J., & Marsh, H. W. (2008). Academic buoyancy: Towards an understanding of students’ everyday academic resilience Journal of School Psychology 46, 53-83.
  • Martin, A.J., & Marsh, H.W. (in press). Academic resilience and academic buoyancy: an encompassing multidimensional and hierarchical framing of concepts, causes, correlates, and cognate constructs Oxford Review of Education.
  • Martin, A.J., & Marsh, H.W. (2008). Workplace and academic buoyancy: Psychometric assessment and construct validity amongst school personnel and students Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment 26, 168-184.
  • Martin, A.J., Marsh, H.W., Debus, R. L. & Malmberg L. E. (2008). Performance and mastery orientation of high school and university/college students – A Rasch perspective Educational And Psychological Measurement 68, 464-487.
  • Scalas, L. F. & Marsh, H. W. (in press). The Role of Actual-Ideal Discrepancy in Explaining the Relation Between Physical Appearance and Self-Concept: A Stronger Methodological Approach European Journal of Personality.
  • Seaton, M., Marsh; H., & Craven, R. G. (in press). Earning Its Place as a Pan-Human Theory: Universality of the Big-Fish-Little-Pond Effect (BFLPE) Across 41 Culturally and Economically Diverse Countries Journal of Educational Psycholoygy.
  • Seaton, M., Marsh; H. W., Dumas; F., Huguet, P., Monteil, J. M, Regner, I., Blanton, H., Buunk, A. P., Gibbons, F. X. Kuyper, H., Suls, J. & Wheeler, L. (2008). In search of the big fish: Investigating the coexistance of the big-fish-little-pond effect with the positive effects of upward comparison British Journal of Social Psychology 47, 73-103.
  • Wen, Z., Marsh, H.W.,  Kit-Tai, H. & (in press). Structural Equation Models of Latent Interactions: An Appropriate Standardized Solution and Its Scale-free Properties Structural Equation Modeling
Edited books and chapters
  • Marsh, H. W., Craven, R. G., & McInerney, D. (Eds.). (2008). Self-Processes, Learning, and Enabling Human Potential: Dynamic New Approaches. International Advances in Self Research. Volume 3. Information Age Press: Greenwich, CT.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2007). Application of confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling in sport and exercise psychology. In G. Tenenbaum & R. C. Eklund. (Eds), Handbook of sport psychology (3rd Ed.). (pp. 774-798). Hoboken, NJ, US: John Wiley & Sons Inc.
  • Marsh, H. W. (In press). A multidimensional, hierarchical model of self-concept: An important facet of personality. In G. J. Boyle (ed.). Handbook of Personality. Sage: London.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2007). Physical Self-Concept and Sport. In S. Jowette & D. Lavallee, David (Eds), Social Psychology in Sport. (pp. 159-179). Champaign, IL, US: Human Kinetics.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2007). Students’ evaluations of university teaching: A multidimensional perspective. In R. P. Perry & J C. Smart (Eds.), The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: An Evidence-Based Perspective (pp.319-384).  New York: Springer.
  • Marsh, H.W., Cheng, J.,  Middleton, C. J. (in press). The Physical Self: Exploring Measurement and Constructs Surrounding Physical Self-Concept
  • Marsh, H.W., Martin, A. J. & Cheng, J. (2008). How we judge ourselves from different perspectives: Contextual influences on self-concept formation. In M. L. Maehr, S. Karabenick & T. Urdan (Eds.). Advances in Motivation and Achievement (Volume 15). New York: Elsevier.
  • Marsh, H.W., & O’Mara, A. J. (2008). Self-concept is as multidisciplinary as it is multidimensional: A review of theory, measurement, and practice in self-concept research. In H. W. Marsh, R. G. Craven, & D. M. McInerney (Eds.). Self-Processes, Learning, and Enabling Human Potential: Dynamic New Approaches. (Volume 3, pp. 87-118). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing
  • Marsh, H.W., & Retali, K. (in press). Academic self-concept. K. Littleton, C. Wood, J. K. Staarman (Eds.). Elsevier Handbook of Educational Psychology: New Perspectives on Learning and Teaching. New York: Elsevier
  • Marsh, H.W., Scalas L.F. (in press). Self-concept and learning: Reciprocal effects model between academic self-concept and academic achievement. To appear in B. McGaw, E. Baker, P. P. Peterson (Eds.) International Encyclopedia of Education, 3rd edition. Elsevier.
  • McInerney, D. M., Marsh, H.W., & Craven, R. G., & (2008). Self-Processes, Learning, and Enabling Human Potential. In H. W. Marsh, R. G. Craven, & D. M. McInerney (Eds.). Self-Processes, Learning, and Enabling Human Potential: Dynamic New Approaches. (Volume 3, pp. 3-12). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.
  • Parada, R., Craven, R. G., & Marsh, H.W. (2008). The beyond bullying secondary program: An innovative program empowering teachers to counteract bullying in schools. Self-Processes, Learning, and Enabling Human Potential: Dynamic New Approaches. (Volume 3, pp. 373-426). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.
  • Seaton, M., Craven, R. G., &  Marsh, H.W. (2008). East Meets West: Investigating the Generalizability of the Big-Fish-Little-Pond Effect in Western and Non-Western Countries. In H. W. Marsh, R. G. Craven, & D. M. McInerney (Eds.). Self-Processes, Learning, and Enabling Human Potential: Dynamic New Approaches. (Volume 3, pp. 353-372). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.
Most important publications (prior to 2008)
  • Marsh, H. W. (2007). Students’ evaluations of university teaching: A multidimensional perspective. In R. P. Perry & J C. Smart (Ed.), The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: An Evidence-Based Perspective (pp.319-384).  New York: Springer.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2007).Self-concept theory, measurement and research into practice: The role of self-concept in educational psychology. Leicester, UK: British Psychological Society.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2007). Application of confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling in sport/exercise psychology. In G. Tenenbaum & R. C. Eklund (Eds.), Handbook of on sport psychology (3rd ed., pp. 774 – 798). New York: Wiley.
  • Marsh, H. W., & Hau, K-T. (2007). Applications of latent-variable models in educational psychology: The need for methodological-substantive synergies. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 32, 151-171.
  • Marsh, H. W., Hau, K-T., Artelt, C., Baumert, J., Peschar, J. L. (2006). OECD’s brief self-report measure of educational psychology’s most useful affective constructs: Cross-cultural, psychometric comparisons across 25 countries. International Journal of Testing. 6, 311–360.  (special issue of journal).
  • Marsh, H. W. & Craven, R. G. (2006). Reciprocal effects of self-concept and performance from a multidimensional perspective: Beyond seductive pleasure and unidimensional perspectives. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 1, 133-163.
  • Marsh, H. W., Martin, A. J., & Hau, K-T. (2006). A Multiple Method Perspective on Self-concept Research in Educational Psychology: A Construct Validity Approach. In M. Eid & E. Diener (Eds.), Handbook of Multimethod Measurement in Psychology (pp. 441-456). American Psychological Association: Washington DC.
  • Marsh, H.W., Papaioannou, A., Theodorakis, Y. (2006). Causal ordering of physical self-concept and exercise behavior: Reciprocal effects model and the influence of physical education teachers. Health Psychology, 25 (3): 316-328
  • Marsh, H. W., Trautwein, U., Lüdtke, O., Köller, O. & Baumert, J. (2006) Integration of multidimensional self-concept and core personality constructs: Construct validation and relations to well-being and achievement. Journal of Personality, 74, 403-455.
  • Marsh, H. W., Ellis, L., Parada, L., Richards, G. & Heubeck, B. G. (2005). A short version of the Self Description Questionnaire II: Operationalizing criteria for short-form evaluation with new applications of confirmatory factor analyses. Psychological Assessment, 17, 81-102.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2005). Big fish little pond effect on academic self-concept. German Journal of Educational Psychology, 19, 119-128.
  • Marsh, H. W. & Kleitman, S. (2005). Consequences of employment during high school: Character building, subversion of academic goals, or a threshold. American Educational Research Journal, 42, 331-369.
  • Marsh, H. W., Debus, R. & Bornholt, L. (2005). Validating Young Children’s Self-concept Responses: Methodological Ways and means to understand their responses. In D. M. Teti (Ed.), Handbook of Research Methods in Developmental Science (pp. 138-160). Blackwell Publishers: Oxford, UK.
  • Marsh, H. W., Hau, K-T & Grayson, D. (2005). Goodness of Fit Evaluation in Structural Equation Modeling. In A. Maydeu-Olivares & J. McArdle (Eds.), Contemporary Psychometrics. A Festschrift for Roderick P. McDonald (pp. 275-340). Mahwah NJ: Erlbaum.
  • Marsh, H. W., & Perry, C. (2005). Does a positive self-concept contribute to winning gold medals in elite swimming? The causal ordering of elite athlete self-concept and championship performances. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 27, 71-91.
  • Marsh, H. W., Trautwein, U., Lüdtke, O., Köller, O. & Baumert, J. (2005) Academic self-concept, interest, grades and standardized test scores: Reciprocal effects models of causal ordering. Child Development, 76, 297-416.
  • Marsh, H. W. & Hau, K. T. (2004). Explaining paradoxical relations between academic self-concepts and achievements: Cross-cultural generalizability of the internal-external frame of reference predictions across 26 countries. Journal of Educational Psychology, 96,  56-67
  • Marsh, H.W., Hau, K.T. & Wen, Z., (2004).  In search of golden rules: Comment on hypothesis testing approaches to setting cutoff values for fit indexes and dangers in overgeneralising Hu & Bentler’s (1999) findings. Structural Equation Modelling, 11, 320-341.
  • Marsh, H. W.; Wen, Z.; Hau, K. (2004). Structural equation models of latent interactions: Evaluation of alternative estimation strategies and indicator construction. Psychological Methods, 9, 275-300.
  • Marsh, H. W. & Hau, K. T. (2003). Big fish little pond effect on academic self-concept: A crosscultural (26 country) test of the negative effects of academically selective schools. American Psychologist, 58, 364-376.
  • Guay, F., Marsh, H. W. & Boivin, M. (2003). Academic self-concept and academic achievement: Development perspectives on their causal ordering. Journal of Educational Psychology, 95, 124-136.
  • Marsh, H. W., Hau, K-T, & Kong, C-K, (2002). Multilevel Modeling of Longitudinal Growth and Change: Substantive Effects or Regression Toward the Mean Artifacts? Multivariate Behavioral Research, 37, 245-282.
  • Jayasinghe, U. W., Marsh, H. W. & Bond, N. (2002). A Multilevel Cross-classified Modelling Approach to Peer Review of Grant Proposals: The Effects of Assessor and Researcher Attributes on Assessor Ratings. Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A-Statistics in Society, 166, 279-300.
  • Marsh, H. W., Ellis, L., & Craven, R. G. (2002). How do preschool children feel about themselves? Unravelling measurement and multidimensional self-concept structure. Developmental Psychology, 38, 376-393.
  • Marsh, H. W. & Hattie, J. (2002). The relationship between research productivity and teaching effectiveness: Complimentary, antagonistic or independent constructs. Journal of Higher Education, 73, 603-642.
  • Marsh, H. W. & Kleitman, S. (2002). Extracurricular school activities: The good, the bad, and the nonlinear. Harvard Educational Review, 72, 464-502.
  • Marsh, H. W., Rowe, K., Martin, A. (2002). PhD students’ evaluations of research supervision: Issues, complexities and challenges in a nationwide Australian experiment in benchmarking universities. Journal of Higher Education, 73 (3), 313-348.
  • Marsh, H. W., Koeller, O., & Baumert, J. (2001). Reunification of East and West German school systems: Longitudinal multilevel modeling study of the big fish little pond effect on academic self-concept. American Educational Research Journal, 38 (2), 321-350.
  • Marsh, H. W., Parada, R. H., Yeung, A. S. & Healey, J. (2001). Aggressive School Troublemakers and Victims:A Longitudinal Model Examining the Pivotal Role of Self-concept. Journal of Educational Psychology, 93(2), 411-419.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2001). Distinguishing between good (useful) and bad workload on students’ evaluations of teaching. American Educational Research Journal, 38 (1), 183-212.
  • Marsh, H. W., Hau, K-T, & Kong, C-K, (2000). Late Immersion and Language of Instruction (English vs. Chinese) in Hong Kong High Schools: Achievement Growth in Language and Nonlanguage Subjects. Harvard Educational Review 70, 302-346.
  • Marsh, H. W., Kong, C-K, Hau, K-T (2000).  Longitudinal Multilevel Modeling of the Big Fish Little Pond Effect on Academic Self-concept:  Counterbalancing Social Comparison and Reflected Glory Effects in Hong Kong High Schools. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 78,  337-349.
  • Marsh, H. W., & Roche, L. A. (2000). Effects of grading leniency and low workloads on students’ evaluations of teaching: Popular myth, bias, validity or innocent bystanders? Journal of Educational Psychology, 92,:202-228.
  • Marsh, H. W., Craven, R. G., & Debus, R. (1998). Structure, stability, and development of young children’s self-concepts: A multicohort-multioccasion study. Child Development, 69(4), 1030-1053.
  • Marsh, H. W., Hau, K-T., Balla, J R., & Grayson, D. (1998) Is more ever too much? The number of indicators per factor in confirmatory factor analysis. Multivariate Behavioral Research, 33, 181-220.
  • Marsh, H. W., & Roche, L. A (1997). Making students’ evaluations of teaching effectiveness effective. American Psychologist, 52, 1187-1197.
  • Marsh, H. W. (1997). The measurement of physical self-concept: A construct validation approach. In K. Fox (Ed.), The physical self-: From motivation to well-being (pp. 27-58). Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.
  • Marsh, H. W.,  & Craven, R. (1997). Academic self-concept: Beyond the dustbowl. In G. Phye (Ed.), Handbook of classroom assessment: Learning, achievement, and adjustment (pp. 131-198). Orlando, FL : Academic Press.

Ingrid Lunt is a psychologist by background, and joined the Oxford Department of Education in 2005, having previously worked for 20 years at the Institute of Education, University of London.

She was Director of Graduate Studies for 5 years, and the first Director of the new ESRC Doctoral Training Centre (DTC) in the Social Sciences.

She has been President of the British Psychological Society (1998-1999), President of the European Federation of Psychologists Associations (1993-1999), and Vice President of the International Union of Psychological Science (2004-2008).

She has carried out research in the field of special educational needs and inclusive education, and more recently in the area of higher education, in particular higher professional education, and doctoral education. For the past 20 years she has been leading a project, initially funded by the European Union, which has been developing a common qualifications framework for psychologists across Europe.

Research

Ingrid’s research interests include higher professional learning, doctoral education, comparative higher education policy in European countries.

Publications

Selected publications include:

  • Scott D., Brown A., Lunt I., Thorne L. (2004) Professional Doctorates: Integrating professional and academic knowledge. Open University Press and SRHE
  • Klenowski V. and Lunt I. (2008) Enhancing Learning at Doctoral Level through the use of reflection? Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education 33, 2, 203-217.
  • Lunt I. (2008) Psychologist qualifications in Europe: Common standards for quality and mobility. Australian Psychologist 43, 4, 222-230
  • Lunt I. (2008) Beyond tuition fees? The legacy of Blair’s government to higher education. Oxford Review of Education 34, 6, 741-752
  • Edwards A., Lunt I., Stamou E. (2010) Inter-professional work and expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools. British Educational Research Journal 36, 1, 27-45
  • Lunt I. (2011) EuroPsy: the development of standards and competence of psychologists. European Psychologist 16, 2, 104-111
  • Lunt I. and Peiro J. M. (2012) The Bologna Process, education and assessment in psychology. In Ed. D. Dunn, S.C Baker, C.M Mehrota, R.E. Landrum, M.M McCarthy Assessing teaching and learning in psychology: current and future perspectives. Wadsworth Publishing, Belmont CA.
  • Lunt I., McAlpine L., Mills D. (2014) Lively bureaucracy: the ESRC’s Doctoral Training Centres and UK universities. Oxford Review of Education 40, 2, 151-170
  • Lunt I. (2014) International frameworks for psychology education and training: a European perspective. In R. Silbereisen, P. Ritchie, J. Panday (eds.) Psychology Education and Training : a global perspective. Hove: Psychology Press
  • Clarke, G. and Lunt, I. (2014) The concept of ‘originality’ in the PhD: how is it interpreted by examiners? Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, 39 (7), 803-820.
  • Lunt I., Peiró J.M., Poortinga Y.H., Roe R.A. (2015) EuroPsy: Standards and Quality in Education for Professional Psychologists. Göttingen: Hogrefe Pub.

Anne joined the Department in 2005 having held Chairs at the Universities of Leeds and Birmingham. She was Director of the Department for three years (January 2010 to December 2012) and when not in that post, she was its Director of Research. She became Professor Emerita in October 2014.

Anne is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, and of the Learned Society of Wales and is a former President of the British Educational Research Association. She is a Fellow of St Hilda’s College and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Oslo from 2007 to 2016 and has been awarded Doctorates honoris causa by the Universities of Helsinki and Oslo and in 2022 she received a lifetime’s achievement award from the American Educational Research Association’s Cultural-Historical SIG.

She was a member of the ESRC’s Research Grants Board between 2003 and 2007 and a member of the Education sub-panel in the 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise. She is co-founder of OSAT (the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research), is a founding editor of Learning Culture and Social Interaction. She is a member of the UK Cabinet Office’s Research Evidence Impact Panel (REIP), sits on several research advisory boards internationally, undertakes research evaluations for research councils worldwide and continues to be involved in institutional reviews.

Research

Anne’s research draws on cultural-historical approaches to learning. She focuses on professional learning and, in particular, the relational turn in expertise with the concepts of relational expertise, common knowledge and relational agency. These ideas are discussed in her 2010 book with Springer. In her later edited book Working relationally in and across practices (Cambridge University Press, 2017) researchers, who work with her ideas, have tested and refined these concepts in a range of different settings. Her research on practice, relational expertise and inter-professional work with vulnerable children and families also informs her interest in user engagement with research and its implications for the design of educational research. User engagement was discussed in her 2011 book with Mark Rickinson and Judy Sebba, in an exploration of knowledge exchange in the social sciences based in Oxford, and in study of school-university research relationships through the work of school-based research champions.

Her current research, informed by cultural-historical theory, is based at the University of Oslo. The research team has recently completed a Norwegian Research Council study of how elementary school teachers work successfully with shy and withdrawn children. The team has been awarded a further four years’ funding to examine shy children’s experiences of transitions between lessons in high school. She is currently co-authoring a book with Mariane Hedegaard for Cambridge University Press, where the two authors revisit their own research studies to make a case for a relational pedagogy, based in Vygotskian approaches to emotion, development and learning. She is also co-editing, with Helen Bound and Karen Evans and Arthur Chia, a collection for Taylor and Francis on current approaches to workplace learning. Her contribution, with Dorothy Sutherland Olsen, draws on a study of the transitions that arise through the introduction of new technologies into existing workplaces.

Publications since 2009

Books

  • Edwards, A., Daniels, H., Gallagher, T., Leadbetter, J. & Warmington, P. (2009) Improving Inter-professional Collaborations: multi-agency working for children’s wellbeing. London: Routledge.
  • Daniels, H., Edwards, A., Engeström, Y. & Ludvigsen, S. (Eds.) (2009) Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge.
  • Ellis, V., Edwards, A. & Smagorinsky, P.  (Eds.) (2009) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Being an Expert Professional Practitioner: the relational turn in expertise. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Rickinson, M., Sebba, J. & Edwards, A. (2011) Improving User-engagement in Educational Research. London: Routledge.
  • Hedegaard, M., Edwards, A. & Fleer, M. (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wells, G. & Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2013) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Edwards, A. (Ed.) (2017) Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Hedegaard, M.& Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2019) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (Eds.) (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer.
  • Bound, H., Edwards, A. & Evans, K. (Eds.) (forthcoming) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor and Francis.
  • Hedegaard, M. & Edwards, A. (forthcoming) Taking Children Seriously: a relational approach to Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chapters in Books

  • Edwards, A.  (2009) Becoming a Teacher, in H. Daniels, J. Porter & H. Lauder (Eds.) Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning: vol 1. London: Routledge, pp. 153-164.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Agency and Activity Theory: from the systemic to the relational, in A Sannino, H Daniels & K. Guttierez (Eds.) Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 197-211.
  • Edwards, A. & Kinti I. (2009) Working Relationally at Organisational Boundaries: negotiating expertise and identity, in H. Daniels, A. Edwards, Y. Engeström & S. Ludvigsen (Eds.)  Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge, pp. 126-139.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) How can CHAT help us to understand and develop teacher education?, in V. Ellis, A. Edwards & P. Smagorinsky (Eds.) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge, pp. 63-77.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Learning How to Know Who: professional learning for expansive practice between organisations, in S Ludvigsen, A. Lund, I. Rasmussen & R. Saljo (Eds.) Learning Across Sites. London: Routledge, pp. 17-32.
  • Edwards, A.  (2010) Qualitative Designs and Analysis, in G. MacNaughton, S. Rolfe & I. Siraj-Blatchford (Eds.) Doing Early Childhood Research: Theory and Process: an international perspective 2nd Edition. Melbourne: Allen and Unwin, pp.155-175.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) Expertise in the Children’s Workforce: knowledge and motivation in engagement with children, in M. Hedegaard, A. Edwards & M. Fleer (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 173-190.
  • Edwards, A. & Ellis, V.  (2012) The Professional Development of Teachers: European perspectives, in C. Day (Ed.) International Handbook on Teacher and School Development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) User Engagement and the Processes of Educational Research, in L. Farrell & T. Fenwick (Eds.) Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities. London:  Routledge
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Integrating Children’s Services, in G. Head (Ed.) Professionals, Children and the Community: working together, London: Pearson.
  • Edwards, A. & Thompson, M. (2013) Resourceful Leadership: revealing the creativity of organizational leaders, in A. Sannino & V. Ellis (Eds.) Learning and Collective Creativity: Activity-Theoretical and Sociocultural Studies. London: Routledge.  pp. 49-64.
  • Childs, A., Edwards, A. & McNicholl, J. (2013) Developing a Multi-layered System of Distributed Expertise: What does cultural historical theory bring to understandings of workplace learning in school university partnerships?, in O. McNamara et al. (Eds.) Teacher Learning in the Workplace: widening perspectives on practice and policy. Dordecht: Springer. pp. 29-45.
  • Lundsteen, N. & Edwards, A. (2013) Internship: navigating the practices of an investment bank, in G. Wells &   Edwards (Eds.) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.pp.155-168.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Learning from Experience in teaching; a cultural historical critique, in V. Ellis & J. Orchard (Eds.) Learning Teaching from Experience: Multiple Perspectives, International Contexts. London: Bloomsbury.pp.47-61.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Designing Tasks which Engage Learners with Knowledge, in I. Thompson (Ed.) Task Design,Subject Pedagogy and Student Engagement. London: Routledge. pp. 13-27.
  • Edwards, A. (2016) A Cultural-historical Approach to Practice: working within and across practices, in J. Lynch et al. (Eds.) Practice Theory: Diffractive readings in professional practice and education. London: Routledge.127-140.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural-historical Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: teaching to support student agency, in B. Leibowitz, V. Bozalek & P. Kahn (Eds.) Theorising Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Taylor and Francis. pp.124-138.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Introductory chapter, final chapter and a joint chapter on knowledge exchange in the social sciences with E. Stamou, in A. Edwards (Ed.), Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural Historical Theory and Pedagogy: the influence of Vygotsky on the field, in R. MacLean (Ed.) Handbook on Life in Schools and Classrooms: Past, present and future visions. Dordrecht, Springer. pp. 153-166.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Relational Expertise: a cultural-historical approach to teacher education, in Peters, B. Cowie & I Menter (Eds.) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 555-567.
  • Edwards, A. & Montecinos, C. (2017) Working Relationally on Complex Problems: building the capacity for joint agency in new forms of work, in M. Goller & S. Paloniemi (Eds.) Agency at Work. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 229-247.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) The Dialectic of Person and Practice: how cultural-historical accounts of agency can inform teacher education, in J. Clandinin & J. Husu (Eds.) The Sage Handbook on Research on Teacher Education, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. pp.269-285.
  • Edwards, A. & Hedegaard, M. (2019) Rethinking Professional Support for Challenging Transitions: enabling the agency of children, young people and their families, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 1-18.
  • Edwards, A. & Evangelou, M. (2019) Easing Transitions into School for Children from Socially Excluded ‘Hard to Reach’ Families: from risk and resilience to agency and demand, in M.Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 115-130.
  • Edwards, A. & Fay, Y. (2019) Supporting the Transitions to Work of Autistic Young People: building and using common knowledge, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp 262-278.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp. 1-20.
  • Edwards, A., Chan, J. & Tan, D. (2019) Motive Orientation and the Exercise of Agency: responding to recurrent demands in practices, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp.201-214.
  • Edwards, A. (in press) Learning for a High Skills Economy: what a cultural-historical approach can offer, in H. Bound, A. Chia, J. Tan & R. Lim Wei Ying (Eds.) Flipping the Lens from Teaching to Learning. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Edwards, A. & Sutherland Olsen, D. (forthcoming) Cultural-historical Understandings of Transitions in Changing Workplaces, in H. Bound, A. Edwards, K. Evans, A. Chia (Eds.) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor & Francis.
  • Edwards, A. (forthcoming) A Relational View of a Future-oriented Pedagogy: sustaining the agency of learners and teachers, in N. Hopwood & A. Sannino (Eds.) Agency and Transformation: Motives, mediation and motion. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Refereed Articles

  • Edwards, A. (2009) Understanding Boundaries in Inter-professional Work, The Scottish Educational Review, 41, 1, 5-21.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Relational Agency in Collaborations for the Wellbeing of Children and Young People, Journal of Children’s Services, 4, 1, 33-43.
  • Shaw, I., Morris, K &. Edwards, A. (2009) Technology, Social Services and Organizational Innovation or How Great Expectations in London and Cardiff are Dashed in Lowestoft and Cymtyrch, Journal of Social Work Practice,  23, 4, 383 – 400.
  • Edwards, A., Lunt, I. & Stamou, E. (2010) Inter-professional Work and Expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools, British Educational Research Journal, 36, 1, 27-45.
  • Edwards, A. (2011) Building Common Knowledge at Boundaries between Professional Practices, International Journal of Educational Research 50, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A & Daniels, H. (2012) The knowledge that matters in professional practices Journal of Education and Work 25, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) The role of common knowledge in achieving collaboration across practices Learning Culture and Social Interaction 1, 1, 22-32.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) A Tool for Public Services Research and Development, International Journal of Public Management. 11,1, 21-33.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Discussant’s Comments: Recognising and Realising Teachers’ Professional Agency, Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice. 21, 6, 779-784.
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. & Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: the development of the Oxford Education Deanery narrative, Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373. http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/edui.v6.27724
  • Hopwood, N., Day, C. & Edwards, A. (2016) Partnership Practice as Collaborative Knowledge Work: overcoming common dilemmas through an augmented view of professional expertise, Journal of Children’s Services. 11, 2, 111-123.
  • Engeness, I. & Edwards, A. (2016) The Complexity of Learning: Exploring the Interplay of Different Mediational Means in Group Learning with Digital Tools, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 61, 1, 650-667. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2016.1173093
  • Hopwood, N. & Edwards, A. (2017) How common knowledge is constructed and why it matters in collaboration between professionals and clients, International Journal of Educational Research, 83, 107–119.
  • Edwards, A. (2020) Agency, Common Knowledge and Motive Orientation: working with insights from Hedegaard in research on provision for vulnerable children and young people, Learning Culture and Social Interaction. 26, 100224. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.lcsi.2018.04.004
  • Mjelve, L.H., Nyborg, G., Edwards, A.& Crozier, R. (2019) Teachers’ Understandings of Shyness: psychosocial differentiation for student inclusion, British Educational Research Journal. 45(6), 1295- doi:10.1002/berj.3563
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, H., Edwards, A. & Crozier, R. (2020 ) Teachers’ Strategies for Enhancing Shy Children’s Engagement in Oral Activities: necessary but insufficient? International Journal of Inclusive Education. 1-16. doi:10.1080/13603116.2020.1711538
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A. & Nyborg, G. (2020) Leading for School Inclusion: how school leadership teams support shy students, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 1-14. doi:10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Solberg, S., Edward, A., Mjelve, L.H., & Nyborg, G. (in press). Working relationally with networks of support within schools: Supporting teachers in their work with shy students. Journal of Education for Children Placed at Risk (JESPAR), 1-23. doi.org/10.1080/10824669.2020.1854760
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A., & Nyborg, G. (2020). Leading for school inclusion and prevention? How school leadership teams support shy students and their teachers. Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, 1-14. doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Burn, K. Conway, R., Edwards, A. & Harries, E. (2021) The Role of School-based Research Champions in a School-University Partnership. British Educational Research Journal, 47(3). 616-633. doi.org/10.1002/berj.3675
  • Rickinson, M. & Edwards, A. (2021) The Relational Features of Evidence Use, Cambridge Journal of Education, 51(4), 509-526.  doi.org/10.1080/0305764X.2020.1865877
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, L.H., Edwards, A., Crozier, R. & Coplan, R. (2022) Working relationally with shy students: pedagogical insights from teachers and students. Learning, Culture and Social Interaction. authors.elsevier.com/sd/article/S2210-6561(22)00011-3

Reports

  • Edwards, A. & Stamou, E. (2009) The Development of Preventative Practices in England: implications for the children’s workforce. DCSF: Children’s Workforce Development Council
  • Hannan, S., Canwell, A. Longfils, H. & Edwards, A. (2011) The Resourceful Leader, Nottingham: National College
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Leading the Learning: how the intelligent leader builds capacity. Nottingham: National College.
  • Edwards, A. & Downes, P. (2013) Alliances for Inclusion: cross-sector policy synergies and inter-professional collaboration in and around schools. NESET for the European Commission.
  • Alexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. & Menter, I. (2014) Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools. Oxford University: CitiFoundation.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Inter-professional Working in and around Schools, in C. McLaughlin (Ed.) The Connected School: a design for wellbeing. London: Pearson / NCB.

Geoffrey Walford is Emeritus Professor of Education Policy and an Emeritus Fellow of Green Templeton College at the University of Oxford.

He was previously Reader in Education Policy at Oxford, and Senior Lecturer in Sociology and Education Policy at Aston Business School, Aston University, Birmingham.

He has academic degrees from Oxford, Kent, London and the Open Universities, has authored or edited more than 40 books, and published rather too many academic articles and book chapters. He was Joint Editor of the British Journal of Educational Studies from 1999 to 2002, and was Editor of the Oxford Review of Education from 2004 to 2010. He remains as a Deputy Editor of Ethnography and Education and serves on several editorial boards.

Professor Walford’s main research foci are the relationships between central government policy and local processes of implementation, private schools, choice of schools, religiously-based schools, and ethnographic research methodology. He remains engaged with various scholarly writing activities working, in particular, on issues connected to private schooling for the poor and social justice. He was awarded a DLitt from Oxford University in 2016.

Publications

Major articles and book chapters

  • Geoffrey Walford (2023) ‘Low-fee private schools.’  In Bob Tierney, Fazal Rizvi and Kadriye Wrcikan (editors-in-chief); Fazal Rizvi and Jason Beech (eds.) Section 1, Globalization and shifting geopolitics of education, International Encyclopedia of Education 4th edition, Vol 1 (Oxford: Elsevier) pp.355-365.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2022) ‘Country houses repurposed as private schools: what might be the motivations?’  Oxford Review of Education, 48, 1, pp. 14-27.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2021) ‘Country houses repurposed as private schools: building on inequality.’ Oxford Review of Education, 47, 3, pp. 369-385.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2021) ‘What is worthwhile auto-ethnography? Research in the age of the selfie.’ Ethnography and Education, 16, 1, pp. 31-43.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2020) ‘Interviews and interviewing in the ethnography of education.’ In George W. Noblit. (ed.) Oxford Encyclopedia of Qualitative Research Methods in Education (New York: Oxford University Press) (Reprint) pp. 672-685.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2020) ‘Ethnography is not qualitative.’ Ethnography and Education, 15, 1, pp. 122-136.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2019) ‘The provenance of Stowe. Percy Warrington: the founder schools wished to forget.’ History of Education Researcher, 104, pp. 100-108.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2018) ‘The impossibility of anonymity in ethnographic research.’ Qualitative Research, 18, 5, pp. 516-525.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2018) ‘Interviews and interviewing in the ethnography of education.’Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Education, Editor in Chief: George W. Noblit. On-line. DOI: 10.1093/acrefore/9780190264093.013.320, May, pp. 20.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2018) ‘Recognisable continuity. A defence of multiple methods.’ In Dennis Beach, Carl Bagley, and Sofia Maques da Silva (eds.) The Wiley Handbook of Ethnography of Education (London, Wiley) pp. 17-29.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2017) ‘Ruling-class classification and framing.’ In Agnés Van Zanten (ed.) Elites in Education, Volume 2, National Traditions and Cosmopolitism in Elite Education. (London, Routledge) (Reprint)
  • Geoffrey Walford (2016) ‘Ethnographic methodology: A Virtual Special Issue of Ethnography and Education. Introduction.’ Ethnography and Education.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2015) ‘The globalisation of low-fee private schools’ In Joseph Zajda (ed.) Second International Handbook on Globalisation, Education and Policy Research (Amsterdam, Springer) ISBN: 978-94-017-9492-3, pp. 309-20.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2014) ‘Site selection within comparative case study and ethnographic research.’ (Reprint) In Malcolm Tight (ed.) Case Studies (London, Sage)
  • Ian Macpherson, Susan Robertson and Geoffrey Walford (2014) ‘An introduction to privatisation, education and social justice.’ In Ian Macpherson, Susan Robertson and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) Education, Privatisation, and Social Justice: Case studies from Africa, South Asia, and South East Asia (Abingdon, Symposium) pp. 9-24.
  • Ingrid Lunt and Geoffrey Walford (2014) ‘Contributions to the sociology of education: Past, present and future. A Festschrift for John Furlong.’ Oxford Review of Education, 40, 4, pp. 411-414.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2014) ‘From City Technology Colleges to Free schools: Ideas of social justice.’ Research Papers in Education, 29, 3, pp. 315-329.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2014) ‘Introduction: Academies, Free Schools and social Justice.’ Research Papers in Education, 29, 3, pp. 263-267.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2013) ‘The development of private and public schools in England.’ In Aydin Gürlevik, Christian Palentien and Robert Heyer (eds.) Privatschulen versus staatliche Schulen (Wiesbaden, Germany: Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden) pp. 89-102.  ISBN: (pb) 978-3-531-18199-8; (e-book) 978-3-531-18978-9.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2013) ‘Low-fee private schools: a methodological and political debate.’ In Prachi Srivastava (ed.) Low-Fee Private Schooling: Aggravating equity or mitigating disadvantage? (Oxford: Symposium Books) pp. 199-213. ISBN: 978-1-873927-91-5.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2013) ‘State support for private schooling in India: What do the evaluations of the British Assisted Places Schemes suggest?’ Oxford Review of Education, 39, 4, pp. 533-547.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2013) ‘The development of private and public schools in England.’ In Aydin Gürlevik, Christian Palentien and Robert Heyer (eds.) Privatschulen versus staatliche Schulen (Wiesbaden, Germany: Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden) pp. 89-102.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2013) ‘Low-fee private schools: a methodological and political debate.’ In Prachi Srivastava (ed.) Low-Fee Private Schooling: Aggravating equity or mitigating disadvantage? (Oxford, Symposium Books) pp. 199-213.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2012) ‘Researching the powerful in education: a re-assessment of the problems.’ International Journal for Research and Method in Education, 35, 2, pp. 111-118
  • Geoffrey Walford (2011) ‘Globalization and low-fee private schools?’ Educational Practice and Theory, 33, 1, pp. 37-50.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2011) ‘The Oxford Ethnography Conference: A place in history?’ Ethnography and Education, 6, 2, pp. 133-145.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2011) ‘Low-fee private schools in England and in less economically developed countries. What can we learn from a comparison?’ Compare, 41, 3, pp. 401-413.
  • Eric Tucker, Madhu Viswanathan and Geoffrey Walford (2010) ‘Reflections on social measurement:  How social scientists generate, modify, and validate indicators and scales.’ In Geoffrey Walford, Eric Tucker and Madhu Viswanathan (eds.) The Sage Handbook of Measurement(London, Sage) pp. 1-5.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2010) ‘Faith-based schools in England after ten years of Tony Blair’, in Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Blair’s Educational Legacy? (London, Routledge) pp. 52-62.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2009) ‘For ethnography?’ Ethnography and Education, 4, 3, pp. 273-284.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2009) ‘Private schools in England.’ Zeitschrift für Pädagogik, 55, 5, pp. 716- 731.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2009) ‘The practice of writing ethnographic fieldnotes.’ Ethnography and Education, 4, 2, pp. 117-130.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2009) ‘Symposium review of: John Beck, Meritocracy, Citizenship and Education’ (with Anthony Giddens and Yoshiko Nozaki) British Journal of Sociology of Education, 30, 1, pp. 97-105.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘Finding the limits: autoethnography and being an Oxford University Proctor.’ In Paul Atkinson and Sara Delamont (eds.) Representing Ethnography (London, Sage) pp. 147-162.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘Selecting sites, and gaining ethical and practical access.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.)How to do Educational Ethnography (London, Tufnell Press) pp. 16-38.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘The nature of educational ethnography.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) How to do Educational Ethnography (London, Tufnell Press) pp. 1-15.
  • Martin Forsey, Scott Davies and Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘The globalisation of school choice: an introduction to key issues and concerns.’ In Martin Forsey, Scott Davies and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) The Globalisation of School Schoice? (Abingdon, Symposium Books) pp. 9-25.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘School choice in England: globalisation, policy borrowing or policy corruption? In Martin Forsey, Scott Davies and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) The Globalisation of School Schoice? (Abingdon, Symposium Books) pp. 95-109.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ’Faith-based schools in England after 10 years of Tony Blair.’ Oxford Review of Education, 34, 6, pp. 689-699.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘Muslim schools in England and the Netherlands: sustaining cultural continuity.’ In Zvi Bekerman and Ezra Kopelowitz (eds.) Cultural Education – Cultural Sustainability: Minority, diaspora, indigenous and ethno-religious groups in multicultural societies. (London, Routledge)
  • Geoffrey Walford (2007) ‘Finding the limits: autoethnography and being an Oxford University Proctor.’ In Alan Bryman (ed.) Qualitative Research 2, Volume 3 Issues of Representation and reflexivity (London, Sage) pp. 214-229.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2007) ‘Classification and framing of interviews in ethnographic interviewing. Ethnography and Education, 2, 2, pp. 145-157.
  • Geoffrey Walford and Prachi Srivastava (2007) ‘Examining Private Schooling in Less Economically Developed Countries: Key Issues and New Evidence.’ In Prachi Srivastava and Geoffrey Walford (2007) (eds.) Private Schooling in Less-Economically Developed Countries: Asian and African perspectives (Abingdon, Symposium Books)
  • Geoffrey Walford (2007) ‘Everyone generalizes, but ethnographers should resist doing so.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Methodological Developments in Ethnography (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 12) (Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, Elsevier)
  • Geoffrey Walford (2006) ‘New Christian schools in England: What are the equity mplications?’ International Journal of Learning, 13, 5, pp. 167-176.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2006) ‘From City Technology Colleges to sponsored grant-maintained schools.’ In David Phillips and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) Tracing Education Policy. Selections from the Oxford Review of Education(London, Routledge) pp. 359-375.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2006) ‘Introduction: education and the Labour Government.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Education and the Labour Government. An evaluation of two terms. (London, Routledge).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2005) ‘Learning and the local community: Is community involvement always a good thing?’ International Journal of Learning, 11, pp. 1219-1225.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2005) ‘Research ethical guidelines and anonymity.’ International Journal of Research and Method in Education, 28, 1, pp. 83-93.
  • Holger Daun, Reza Arjmand and Geoffrey Walford (2004) ‘Muslims and education in a global context.’ In Holger Daun and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) Educational Strategies among Muslims in the Context of Globalization. Some National Case Studies. (Leiden, Boston, Brill) pp. 5-36.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2004) ‘Private schooling in England’ (in Chinese) Journal of Non-Government Educational Development, 103, pp. 55-60.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2004) ‘When tradition meets modern law: changing the role of the Oxford University Proctors.’ Research in Education, 72, pp. 103-114.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2004) ‘No discrimination on the basis of irrelevant qualifications.’ Cambridge Journal of Education, 34, 3, pp. 353-361.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2004) ‘Finding the limits: autoethnography and being an Oxford University Proctor.’Qualitative Research, 4, 3, pp. 403-417.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘Country Report on school-based management in England.’ Precedings of the Third International Forum on Educational Reform Education Decentralization Revisited: School-Based Management(Bangkok, Office of the Education Council) pp. 1-23.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘Separate schools for religious minorities in England and the Netherlands: using a framework for the comparison and evaluation of policy.’Research Papers in Education , 18, 3, pp 1-19.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘School choice, educational change and inequality in England.’ In The Organising Committee (eds.) Proceedings of the 37th Annual Conference of the Japan Educational Administration Society(Tokyo, Dojidai Sha, Nichi-nichi Kyoiku Bunko)  pp. 19-49 (in Japanese) pp.147-172 (in English).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘Muslim schools in Britain.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) British Private Schools: research on policy and practice. (London, Woburn Press) pp. 158-174.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘Introduction.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) British Private Schools: research on policy and practice. (London, Woburn Press) pp. 1-8.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘School choice and educational change in England and Wales.’ In  David N. Plank and Gary Sykes (eds.) Choosing Choice: School Choice in International Perspective (New York & London, Teachers College Press) pp. 68-91.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘Education.’ In W. S. F. Pickering (ed.) Durkheim Today, New York, Oxford, Berghahn Books,  pp. 105-115.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘Introduction.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Doing a Doctorate in Educational Ethnography (Studies in  Educational Ethnography, Volume 7) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI, pp. 1-8.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘When policy moves fast, how long can ethnography take?’ In Bradley A. U. Levinson, Sandra L. Cade, Ana Padawer and Ana Patricia Elvir (eds.) Ethnography and Education Policy Across the Americas, Westport, CT, Praeger,  pp. 23-38.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘Why don’t we name our research sites?’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Educational Ethnography and Methodology, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 6) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI, pp. 95-105.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘Educational reform and sociology in England and Wales.’ In David L. Levinson, Peter W. Cookson, Jr., and Alan R. Sadovnik (eds.) Education and Sociology: An Encyclopaedia, New York and London, RoutledgeFalmer, pp. 211-219.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘Classification and framing of the curriculum in evangelical Christian and Muslim schools in England and the Netherlands.’ Educational Studies, 28, 4, pp. 403-419.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘Redefining school effectiveness.’ Westminster Studies in Education, 25, 1, pp. 47-58.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘The state and civil society in education in England: past developments and current problems.’ In Heinz-Dieter Meyer and William Lowe Boyd (eds.) Education between State, Markets, and Civil Society: Comparative perspectives, Mahwah, NJ & London, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, pp. 81-100.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Privatization in industrialized countries.’ In Henry M. Levin (ed.) Privatizing Education. Can the marketplace deliver choice, efficiency, equity, and social cohesion? Boulder, CO  & Oxford, Westview Press, pp. 178-200.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘From common schooling to selection? Affirming and contesting the comprehensive ideal, 1976-2001.’ In Robert Phillips and John Furlong (eds.)  Education, Reform and the State: Politics, Policy and Practice 1976-2001 London & New York, RoutledgeFalmer, pp. 45-57.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Introduction: ethnography and policy.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Ethnography and Education Policy, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 4) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI, pp. 1-9.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Durkheim, democracy and diversity: some thoughts on recent changes in England and Wales.’ In W S F Pickering (ed.) Emile Durkheim: Critical Assessments of Leading Sociologists. Volume VI,London & New York, Routledge, pp. 543-559.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Introduction’ (to Education Section). In W S F Pickering (ed.) Emile Durkheim: Critical Assessments of Leading Sociologists. Volume VI, London & New York, Routledge, pp. 365-371.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Funding for religious schools in England and the Netherlands. Can the piper call the tune?’ Research Papers in Education, 16, 4, pp. 359-380.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Evangelical Christian schools in England and the Netherlands.’  Oxford Review of Education, 27, 4, pp. 529-541.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Building identity through communities of practice: Evangelical Christian schools in the Netherlands.’ International Journal of Education and Religion, 2, 2, pp. 126-143.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘The fate of the new Christian schools: from growth to decline?’ Educational Studies,27, 4, pp. 465-477.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Site selection within comparative case-study and ethnographic research.’ Compare, 31, 2, pp.151-164.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Does the market ensure quality?’ Westminster Studies in Education 24, 1, pp. 23-33.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘School choice and social exclusion in England and Wales.’ In John Sayer and Johan Vanderhoven (eds.) School Choice, Equity and Social Exclusion, Leuven, Garant.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘Introduction.’ In Geoffrey Walford and Caroline Hudson (eds.) Genders and Sexualities in Educational Ethnography, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 3) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI/Elsevier.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘First days in the field: gender and sexuality in an evangelical Christian school.’ In Geoffrey Walford and Caroline Hudson (eds.) Genders and Sexualities in Educational Ethnography, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 3) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI/Elsevier.
  • W S F Pickering and Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘Introduction.’ In W. S.F. Pickering and Geoffrey Walford (eds.)Durkheim’s Suicide: a century of research and debate, London & New York, Routledge, pp. 1-10.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘What’s new about academic capitalism’ Learning & Managing, 6, 2, pp. 174-181.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘Government policy on private schooling in England’ Education and Society, 18, 1, pp. 25-43.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘From City Technology Colleges to sponsored grant-maintained schools’ Oxford Review of Education, 26, 2, pp. 145-158.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘A policy adventure: sponsored grant-maintained schools’ Educational Studies, 26, 2, pp. 247-262.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1999) ‘L’enseignement privé en Angleterre: tendances récentes et problèmes soulevés’Carrefours de l’éducation, 8, pp. 126-139.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1999) ‘Selling your way in: gaining access to research sites.’ In Alexander Massey and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) Explorations in Methodology, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 2)  Stamford, CT, JAI Press,  pp. 1-15.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1999) ‘Educating religious minorities within the English state-maintained sector’International Journal of Educational Management, 13, 2, pp. 98-106.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Durkheim, democracy and diversity: some thoughts on recent changes in England.’ In Geoffrey Walford and W. S. F. Pickering (eds.)  Durkheim and Modern Education, London & New York, Routledge, pp. 125-141.
  • W. S. F. Pickering and Geoffrey Walford (1988) ‘Introduction: Durkheim and education.’ In Geoffrey Walford and W. S. F. Pickering (eds.) Durkheim and Modern Education, London & New York, Routledge, pp. 1-16.
  • Alexander Massey and Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Children learning: Ethnographers learning.’ In Geoffrey Walford and Alexander Massey  (eds.) Children Learning in Context, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 1), Stamford, CT & London, JAI Press, pp. 1-18.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Essay review: Is there a ‘new variant’ diploma disease?’ Oxford Review of Education, 24, 3,  pp. 405-409.
  • David Rigoni and Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Questioning the quick-fix: Assertive Discipline and the 1997 Education White Paper’ Journal of Education Policy, 13, 3, pp. 443-452.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Compulsive writing behaviour: getting it published.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Doing Research About Education, London & Washington D.C., Falmer, pp. 184-198.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Research accounts count.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Doing Research About Education, London & Washington, D.C., Falmer, pp. 1-10.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Reading and writing the small print: The fate of sponsored grant-maintained schools.’  Educational Studies, 24, 2, pp. 241-257.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘School choice and the common good: a reply to Brighouse’ Oxford Review of Education, 23, 4, pp. 517-521.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997)  ‘The 14-19 curriculum in private schools.’ In Sally Tomlinson (ed.) Education 14-19: Critical Perspectives, London & Atlantic Highlands, NJ, Athlone, pp. 101-112.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘Diversity, choice and selection in England and Wales’ Educational Administration Quarterly 33, 2, pp. 158-169.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘Sponsored grant-maintained schools: extending the franchise?’ Oxford Review of Education, 23, 1, pp. 31-44.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘Education and private schools.’ In Anthony Giddens (ed.) Sociology: Introductory readings, Cambridge, Polity, pp. 329-336.
  • Steven Carroll and Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘The child’s voice in school choice’ Educational Management and Administration, 25, 2, pp. 169-180.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘Privatization and selection.’ In Richard Pring and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) Affirming the Comprehensive Ideal, London, Falmer.
  • Steven Carroll and Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘Parents’ responses  to the school quasi-market’ Research Papers in Education, 12, 1, pp. 3-26.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘Power and responsibility in pressure group activity.’ In Keith Watson, Sohan Modgil and Celia Modgil (eds.)  Educational Dilemmas: Debate and diversity, London, Cassell,  pp. 247-253 and 264-265.
  • Steven Carroll and Geoffrey Walford (1996) ‘A panic about school choice’ Educational Studies, 22, 3, pp. 393-407.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1996)  ‘School choice and equity in England and Wales’  Oxford Studies in Comparative Education, 6, 1, pp. 49-62.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1996) ‘Diversity and choice in school education: an alternative view’ Oxford Review of Education,  22, 2, pp. 143-154.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1996)  ‘Faith-based grant-maintained schools: Selective international policy borrowing from The Netherlands’ in John Ahier, Ben Cosin and Margaret Hales (eds.) Diversity and Change: Education, policy and selection, London, Routledge, pp. 63-78.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995)  ‘The Northbourne amendments: Is the House of Lords a garbage can?’ Journal of Education Policy, 10 (5) pp. 413-425.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995) ‘Faith-based schools, diversity and inequity.’ In Gwen Wallace (ed.)  Schools, Markets and Management, Bournmouth, Hyde Publications, pp. 13-20.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995) ‘The Christian Schools Campaign – a successful educational pressure group?’ British Educational Research Journal, 21 (4) pp. 451-464.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995)  ‘Faith-based grant-maintained schools: Selective international policy borrowing from The Netherlands.’ Journal of Education Policy, 10 (2) pp. 245-257.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995) ‘Classification and framing in English public boarding schools.’  In Paul Atkinson, Brian Davies and Sara Delamont (eds.) Discourse and Reproduction. Essays in honor of Basil Bernstein, New Jersey, USA, Hampton Press, pp. 191-207.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994)  ‘A return to selection?’ Westminster Studies in Education, 17, pp. 19-30.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994) ‘Political commitment in the study of the City Technology College, Kingshurst.’  In David Halpin and Barry Troyna (eds.) Researching Education Policy: Ethical and Methodological Issues, London, Falmer, pp. 94-106.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994)  ‘The dilemma of choice in education.’ In Ian Lawrence (ed.) Education Tomorrow, London, Cassell, pp. 130-144.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994)  ‘Reflections on researching the powerful.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Researching the Powerful in Education, London, UCL Press, pp. 222-231.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994)  ‘Ethics and power in a study of pressure group politics.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.)Researching the Powerful in Education, London, UCL Press, pp. 81-93.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994) ‘A new focus on the powerful.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Researching the Powerful in Education, London, UCL Press, pp. 2-11.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994) ‘Educational choice, control and inequity.’ In David Scott (ed.) Accountability and Control in Educational Settings, London, Cassell, pp. 73-86.
  • Colin Poyntz and Geoffrey Walford (1994) ‘The new Christian schools: A survey.’  Educational Studies, 20, 1, pp. 127-143.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994) ‘The new religious grant-maintained schools.’ Educational Management and Administration, 22, 2, pp. 123-130.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994)   ‘Weak choice, strong choice and the new Christian schools.’ In J. Mark Halstead (ed.)  Parental Choice and Education: Principles, policies and practice,  London, Kogan Page, pp. 139-150.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1993)  ‘Self-managing schools, choice and equity.’ In John Smyth (ed.) A Socially Critical View of the Self-Managing School, Basingstoke, Falmer, pp. 229-244.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1993)  ‘Selection for secondary schooling.’  In Briefings for the Paul Hamlyn Foundation National Commission on Education,  London, Heinemann, pp. 89-102.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1993) ‘The real lessons in school reform from Britain.’ Educational Policy, 7, 2, pp. 212-222.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1993) ‘Girls’ private schooling: past and present.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) The Private Schooling of Girls: Past and present, London, Woburn Press, pp. 9-32.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1992)  Selection for Secondary Schooling National Commission on Education Briefing Paper No. 7,  October.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1992) ‘Educational reform in the 1980s: National case studies. Great Britain.’ In Peter W. Cookson, Jr., Alan R. Sadovnik and Susan F. Semel (eds.) International Handbook of Educational Reform, Westport, CT, USA, Greenwood Press, pp. 209-227.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1992) ‘Educational choice and equity in Great Britain.’ Educational Policy (USA), 6, (2) pp. 123-138.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1992) ‘The reform of higher education.’ In Madeline Arnot and Len Barton (eds.)  Voicing Concerns: Sociological Perspectives on contemporary educational reforms, Wallingford, Triangle Books, pp. 186-200.
  • Sharon Gewirtz, Henry Miller and Geoffrey Walford (1991) ‘Parents’ individualist and collectivist strategies at the City Technology College, Kingshurst.’ International Studies in Sociology of Education, 1, pp. 173-191.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991)  ‘The changing relationship between government and higher education in Britain.’  In Guy Neave and Frans van Vught (ed.) Prometheus Bound. The changing relationship between government and higher education in Western Europe, Oxford, Pergamon, pp. 165-183.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991) ‘Researching the City Technology College, Kingshurst.’  In Geoffrey Walford (ed.)Doing Educational Research, London, Routledge, pp. 82-100.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991)  ‘Reflexive accounts of doing educational research.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.)  Doing Educational Research, London, Routledge, pp. 1-17.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991)  ‘Choice of school at the first City Technology College.’ Educational Studies, 17, 1, pp. 65-75.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991)  ‘City Technology Colleges: A private magnetism?’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.)  Private Schooling: Tradition, change and diversity, London, Paul Chapman, pp. 158-76.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991) ‘The reluctant private sector: of small schools, people and politics.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Private Schooling: tradition, change and diversity, London Paul Chapman, pp. 115-32.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1990)  ‘Developing choice in British education.’  Compare. A Journal of Comparative Education, 20, 1, pp 22-56.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1990) ‘The 1988 Education Reform Act for England and Wales: Paths to privatization.’ Educational Policy, 4, 2, pp. 127-44.
  • Mark H. Robson and Geoffrey Walford (1989) ‘Independent schools and tax policy under Mrs Thatcher.’ Journal of Education Policy, 4, 2, pp. 149-62.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1989) ‘Scotland: Changes in government policy towards private schools.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.)  Private Schools in Ten Countries: Policy and practice, London, Routledge, pp. 32-56.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1989)  ‘Private schools policy and practice in comparative perspective.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Private Schools in Ten Countries: Policy and practice, London, Routledge, pp. 1-7.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1989)  ‘Bullying in public schools: Myth and reality.’ In Delwyn P. Tattum and David Lane (eds.) Bullying in Schools, London, Trentham Books, pp. 81-88.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1988)  ‘Young people’s views about the Youth Training Scheme in Scotland.’ British Journal of Sociology of Education, 9, 4, pp. 437-51.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1988)  ‘Shouts of joy and cries of pain: investigating young people’s comments on leaving school and entering the labour market.’ In David Raffe (ed.)  Education and the Youth Labour Market: Schooling and scheming, Lewes, Falmer, pp. 243-65.
  • Geoffrey Walford, June Purvis and Andrew Pollard (1988)  ‘Ethnography, policy and the emergence of the new vocationalism.’  In Andrew Pollard, June Purvis and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) Education, Training and the New Vocationalism: Experience and policy, Milton Keynes, Open University Press, pp. 3-14.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1988) ‘Training the elite – for education, training and jobs.’ Collected Original Resources in Education, 12, 1, pp. 1-19.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1988)  ‘The privatisation of British higher education.’ European Journal of Education, 23, 1/2, pp. 47-64.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1988)  ‘The Scottish Assisted Places Scheme. A comparative study of the origins, nature and practice of the APS in Scotland, England & Wales.’ Journal of Education Policy, 3, 2, pp. 137-53.
  • Mark H. Robson and Geoffrey Walford (1988)  ‘U.K. tax policy and independent schools.’ British Tax Review, 2, pp. 38-54.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1987)  ‘How important is the independent sector in Scotland’ Scottish Educational Review, 19, 2, pp. 108-21.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1987)  ‘How dependent is the independent sector?’ Oxford Review of Education, 13, 3, pp. 275-96.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1987)  ‘Research role conflicts and compromises in public schools.’  In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Doing Sociology of Education, Lewes, Falmer, pp. 45-65.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1987)  ‘The research process.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Doing Sociology of Education, Lewes, Falmer, pp. 1-15.
  • Geoffrey Walford and Sïan Jones (1986) ‘The Solihull adventure. An attempt to reintroduce selective education.’  Journal of Education Policy, 1, 3, pp. 239-53.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1986)  ‘Ruling-class classification and framing.’  British Educational Research Journal, 12, 2, pp. 183-95.
  • Henry Miller and Geoffrey Walford (1986) ‘A case study of financial constraints in British universities.’ IHELG Monograph, Number 86/5, Institute for Higher Education Law and Governance, University of Houston, Texas, USA.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1985)  ‘The influence of external pressure groups on the school curriculum: Two examples.’  Collected Original Resources in Education, 9, 2, pp. 1-45.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1985)  ‘The construction of a curriculum area.’ British Journal of Sociology of Education, 6, 2, pp. 155-71.
  • Henry Miller and Geoffrey Walford (1985)  ‘University cut and thrust.’  In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Schooling in Turmoil, Beckenham, Croom Helm, pp. 244-68.
  • Richard Thompson and Geoffrey Walford (1985)  ‘Teachers learning about industry: The two curricula and cultural disadvantage.’  In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Schooling in Turmoil, Beckenham, Croom Helm, pp. 59-83.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1984)  ‘The changing professionalism of public school teachers.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) British Public Schools: Policy and practice, Lewes, Falmer, pp. 111-35.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1984)   ‘The numbering of postgraduate research.’  Higher Education Review, 16, 2, pp. 61-65.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1983)  ‘Science education and sexism in the Soviet Union.’  School Science Review, 85, 2, pp. 213-24.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1983)  ‘Postgraduate education and the student’s contribution to research.’ British Journal of Sociology of Education, 4, 3, pp. 241-54.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1983) ‘Research state and research style: A sociological analysis of postgraduate education.’  Collected Original Resources in Education, 7, 1, pp. 1-108.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1983)  ‘Science textbook images and the reproduction of sexual divisions in society.’ Research in Science and Technological Education, 1, 1, pp. 65-72.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1983)  ‘Parental attitudes and girls in physical science.’ School Science Review, 64, pp. 566-67.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1983)  ‘Girls in boys’ public schools: A prelude to further research.’ British Journal of Sociology of Education, 4, 1, pp. 39-54.
  • Leo Raby and Geoffrey Walford (1981) ‘Job status aspirations and their determinants for middle and lower stream pupils in an urban, multi-racial comprehensive school.’ British Educational Research Journal, 7, 2, pp. 173-81.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1981)  ‘Classification and framing in higher education.’ Studies in Higher Education, 6, 2, pp. 147-58.
  • Leo Raby and Geoffrey Walford (1981) ‘Career related attitudes and their determinants for middle- and low-stream pupils in an urban, multi-racial comprehensive school.’ Research in Education, 25, pp. 19-35.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1980) ‘Why physics students start doctorates.’ Studies in Higher Education, 5, 1, pp. 77-80.

Books

  • Geoffrey Walford (2006) Markets and Equity in Education London, Continuum, ISBN: 0 8264 8735 1.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2005) Private Education: tradition and continuity
    London, Continuum, ISBN: 0 8264 8599 5.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) Doing Qualitative Educational Research: a personal guide to the research process, London, Continuum. ISBN: 0-8264-4701-5,  0-8264-4702-3.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) Policy, Politics and Education – sponsored grant-maintained schools and religious diversity, Aldershot, Ashgate. ISBN: 0-7456-1031-4.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1996) Public School, Japanese edition of Life in Public Schools, translated by Yo Takeuchi. Japan, Sekai Shisosha Kyogakusha. ISBN: 4-7907-0626-5.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995) Educational Politics: Pressure groups and faith-based schools, Aldershot, Avebury, ISBN: 1-85628-907-9.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994) Choice and Equity in Education, London, Cassell, ISBN: 0-304-32775-1,  0-304-32774-3.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1993) Contemporary British Education and Privatization, Japanese edition of Privatization and Privilege in Education with new forward and postscript, translated by Norio Iwahashi, Kyoto, Japan, Houritu-Bunka-sha, ISBN: 4589-01705-9.
  • Geoffrey Walford and Henry Miller (1991) City Technology College, Milton Keynes, Open University Press, ISBN: 0335 09275 6.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1990) Privatization and Privilege in Education, London & New York, Routledge, ISBN: 0415 04247 X,  0415 04248 8.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1987) Restructuring Universities: Politics and power in the management of change, Beckenham, Croom Helm, ISBN: 07099 3694 X.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1986) Life in Public Schools, London, Methuen, ISBN: 0416 37170 1,  0416 37180 9.
  • Richard Thompson and Geoffrey Walford (1983) Teachers into Industry, Birmingham, AEEM, ISBN: 0903 703 14 9.

Edited books

  • Prachi Srivastava and Geoffrey Walford (2018) Non-State Actors in Education in the Global South. London, Routledge. ISBN: 978-1-138-57067-2 (hb), 143 pp.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2016)(ed.) Academies, Free Schools and social Justice (Didcot, Routledge) ISBN 13: 978-1-138-96007-7, 118 pp.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2016)(ed.) Privatization, Education and Social Justice (Didcot, Routledge) ISBN 13: 978-1-138-59439-7, 150 pp.
  • Ian Macpherson, Susan Robertson and Geoffrey Walford (eds.)(2014) Education, Privatisation, and Social Justice: Case studies from Africa, South Asia, and South East Asia (Abingdon, Symposium)
  • Geoffrey Walford, Eric Tucker and Madhu Viswanathan (2010) (eds.) The Sage Handbook of Measurement (London, Sage) ISBN: 978-1-4129-4814-2.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2010) (ed.) Blair’s Educational Legacy? (London, Routledge) ISBN: 0-415-48305-0.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) (ed.) How to do Educational Ethnography, London, Tufnell Press, ISBN: 978-1-872767-92-5 (pb).
  • Martin Forsey, Scott Davies and Geoffrey Walford (2008(eds.) The Globalisation of School VChoice? Abingdon, Symposium Books, ISBN: 978-1-873927-12-0 (pb).
  • Prachi Srivastava and Geoffrey Walford (2007) (eds.) Private Schooling in Less-Economically Developed Countries: Asian and African Perspectives Abingdon, Symposium Books. ISBN: 978-1-873927-85-4 (pb).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2007) (ed.) Methodological Developments in Ethnography (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 12) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, Elsevier.  ISBN: 0-7623-1437-0 (hb).
  • David Phillips and Geoffrey Walford (2006) (eds.) Tracing Education Policy: Selections for the Oxford Review of Education Abingdon, Routledge. ISBN: 0-413-39861-4 (hb).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2006) (ed.) Education and the Labour Government: an evaluation of two termsAbingdon, Routledge. ISBN: 0 415 36870 7 (hb).
  • Geoff Troman, Bob Jeffrey and Geoffrey Walford (2005) (eds.) Methodological issues and practices in Ethnography. (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 11) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, Elsevier.  ISBN: 0-7623-1252-1 (hb).
  • Geoff Troman, Bob Jeffrey and Geoffrey Walford (2004) (eds.) Identity, Agency, and Social Institutions in Educational Ethnography. (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 10) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, Elsevier. ISBN: 0-7623-1144-4 (hb).
  • Bob Jeffrey and Geoffrey Walford (2004) (eds.)Ethnographies of Educational and Cultural Conflicts: Strategies and resolutions. (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 9) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, Elsevier. ISBN: 07623-11126 (hb).
  • Holger Daun and Geoffrey Walford (2004) (eds.) Educational Strategies among Muslims in the Context of Globalization. Leiden, Brill. ISBN: 90-04-13675-4 (hb).
  • Geoffrey Walford and W. S. F. Pickering (2003) (ed.) Durkheim and Modern Education, Japanese Edition. Tokyo, Tokyo Metropolitan University Press. ISBN: 4-88683-496-5 (hb).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) (ed.) British Private Schools: research on policy and practice, London, Woburn Press. ISBN: 0-7130-0228-X,  0-7130-4048-3.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) (ed.) Investigating Educational Policy through Ethnography, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume  Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-1018-9 (hb).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) (ed.) Doing a Doctorate in Educational Ethnography, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 7) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-0906-7 (hb).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) (ed.) Debates and Developments in Ethnographic Methodology, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 6) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-0893-1.
  • Phil Carspecken and Geoffrey Walford (2001) (eds.) Critical Educational Ethnography,
    (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 5) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-0797-8.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) (ed.) Ethnography and Education Policy, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 4) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-0768-4.
  • Geoffrey Walford and Caroline Hudson (2000) (eds.) Genders and Sexualities in Educational Ethnography, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 3) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-0738-2.
  • W. S. F. Pickering and Geoffrey Walford (2000) (eds.) Durkheim’s Suicide: a century of research and debate, London & New York, Routledge. ISBN: 0-415-20582-4.
  • Alexander Massey and Geoffrey Walford (1999) (eds.) Explorations in Methodology, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 2) Stamford, CT, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-0563-0.
  • Geoffrey Walford and Alexander Massey (1998) (eds.) Children Learning in Context, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 1). London & Greenwich, CT, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-76230-436-7.
  • Geoffrey Walford and W. S. F. Pickering (1998) (eds.) Durkheim and Modern Education, London & New York, Routledge. ISBN: 0-415-18168-2.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1998) (ed.) Doing Research about Education, London & Washington D.C., Falmer. ISBN: 0-7507-0782-8,  0-7507-0783-6.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) (ed.) Choice, Diversity and Equity in Secondary Schooling, Special Issue of Oxford Review of Education. ISSN:  0305-4985 .
  • Richard Pring and Geoffrey Walford (1997) (eds.) Affirming the Comprehensive Ideal, London & Washington D.C., Falmer. ISBN: 0-7507-0619-8,  0-7507-0620-1.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1996) (ed.) School Choice and the Quasi-Market, Special Issue of Oxford Studies in Comparative Education, Wallingford, Triangle Books. ISBN: 1-873927-23-1.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995) (ed.) La Otra Cara de la Investigación Educativa, Spanish edition of Doing Educational Research, translated by Javier Orduna Cosmen. Madrid, La Muralla. ISBN: 84-7133-646-4.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994) (ed.) Researching the Powerful in Education, London, UCL Press, ISBN: 1-85728-133-0, 1-85728-134-9.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1993) (ed.) The Private Schooling of Girls: Past and present, London, Woburn Press, ISBN: 0-7130-0186-0.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1992) (ed.) Privatne Skole. Iskustva u deset zemalja, Croatian edition of Private Schools in Ten Countries, translated by Mirna Varlandy Supek, Zagreb, Croatia, EDUCA Publishing House, ISBN: 86-7841-002-7.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991) (ed.) Doing Educational Research, London, Routledge, ISBN: 0415 05289 0,  0415 05290 4.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991) (ed.) Private Schooling: Tradition, change and diversity, London, Paul Chapman, ISBN: 185396 116 7.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1989) (ed.) Private Schools in Ten Countries: Policy and practice, London & New York, Routledge, ISBN: 0415 03464 7.
  • Andrew Pollard, June Purvis and Geoffrey Walford (1988) (eds.) Education, Training and the New Vocationalism: experience and policy, Milton Keynes & Philadelphia, Open University Press, ISBN: 0335 15845 5,  0335 15844 7.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1987) (ed.) Doing Sociology of Education, Lewes & Philadelphia, Falmer, ISBN: 085000 145 6,  085000 146 4.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1985) (ed.) Schooling in Turmoil, Beckenham, Croom Helm, ISBN: 07099 3618 4.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1984) (ed.) British Public Schools: Policy and practice,
    Lewes & Philadelphia, Falmer, ISBN: 0905 273 84 2,  0905 273 83 4.

Anne’s main areas of research in Mathematics Education are exemplification and task design in mathematics teaching and learning, from a variation theory perspective; the role of mathematics education in social justice issues; the use of fine-grained approaches to analysis of mathematics interaction within socio-cultural perspectives and the school mathematics curriculum.

Detailed information, papers, presentations and activities can be found on her website at pmtheta.com and on researchgate.net.

Anne convened and co-edited an Study on Task Design for the International Committee on Mathematics Education and has co-authored a book about learning key ideas in secondary mathematics – Key Ideas in Teaching Mathematics for Oxford University Press.

Her most recent publication is the book: Care in Mathematics Education published by Palgrave-Macmillan.

She is a member of the Association of Teachers of Mathematics (ATM), the British Society for Research into the Learning of Mathematics, the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education and the Higher Education Academy and the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group. She is a Fellow of the International Society for Design and Development in Education.  In retirement she runs, with her husband John Mason, free workshops for teachers and others on key conceptual themes that run throughout mathematics (see pmtheta@home on pmtheta.com).

Anne is a member of the Quaker Values in Education Group of the Society of Friends, see: Rowe, D. and Watson, A. (eds.) (2018)  Faith and Experience in Education: essays on Quaker perspectives. London: Trentham Press.

Activities in curriculum
  • Two syntheses of research about how children learn mathematics for the Nuffield Foundation: Key Understandings in Learning Mathematics (with Nunes and Bryant) and Key Ideas in Teaching Mathematics (with Jones and Pratt).
  • Member of the expert drafting panel for the primary and secondary mathematics National Curriculum for the Department for Education.
  • Curriculum Advisor to the Welsh Assembly.
Publications
Selected recent papers
  • Biza, I., Hewitt, A., Watson, A., Mason, J. (2019) Generalization Strategies in Finding the nth Term Rule for Simple Quadratic Sequences. International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, (), 1-22 DOI 10.1007/s10763-019-10009-0
  • Venkat, H., Askew, M., Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2019) Architecture of Mathematical Structure. FLM 39(1), 19-23.
  • Biza, I., Hewitt, A., Watson, A., Mason, J. (2019) Generalization Strategies in Finding the nth Term Rule for Simple Quadratic Sequences. International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, (), 1-22 DOI 10.1007/s10763-019-10009-0
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018) A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice.  73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • Al-Murani, T., Kilhamn, C., Morgan, D., & Watson, A. (2018). Opportunities for learning: the use of variation to analyse examples of a paradigm shift in teaching primary mathematics in England. Research in Mathematics Education, 1-19.
  • Watson, A., Ayalon, M., & Lerman, S. (2018). Comparison of students’ understanding of functions in classes following English and Israeli national curricula. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 97(3), 255-272.
  • Ayalon, M., Watson, A. & Lerman, S. (2016) Students’ conceptualisations of function revealed through definitions and examples. Research in Mathematics Education. 19(1), 1-19
  • Watson, A. (2016) Pedagogy of variations: synthesis of various notions of variation pedagogy in Huang, R. & Li, Y. (eds.) Teaching and learning mathematics through variation. p85-105. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers
  • Ayalon, M., Watson, A. & Lerman, S. (2016) Reasoning about variables in 11 to 18 year olds: informal, schooled and formal expression in learning about functions. Mathematics Education Research Journal. 28(3), 379-404.
  • Ayalon, M., Watson, A., & Lerman, S. (2015). Progression Towards Functions: Students’ Performance on Three Tasks About Variables from Grades 7 to 12. International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, 90(3), 321-339
  • Ayalon, M., Watson, A. and Lerman, S. (2015) Functions represented as linear sequential data: relationships between presentation and student responses Educational Studies in Mathematics.Online DOI 10.1007/s10649-015-9628-9
  • Watson, A. and Ohtani, M. (2015) Themes and issues in mathematics education concerning task design: Editorial introduction. In Watson, A. and Ohtani, M. (eds.) Task Design in Mathematics Education: An ICMI study.  (pp. 3-18 ) Heidelberg: Springer
  • Watson, A. and Thompson, D. (2015) Design issues related to text-based tasks. In Watson, A. and Ohtani, M. (eds.) Task Design in Mathematics Education: An ICMI study.  (pp.143-190) Heidelberg: Springer.
  • Watson, A., De Geest, E. (2014) Department-initiated change. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(3), 351-368.
Selected Books
  • Watson, A. (2021) Care in Mathematics Education: Alternative educational spaces and practices. Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Watson, A. (ed.) (2018) Variation in mathematics: A collection of writings from ATM Mathematics Teaching. Association of Teachers of Mathematics, Derby, UK.
  • Watson, A. and Ohtani, M. (2015) (Eds.) Task Design in Mathematics Education: An ICMI study.  Heidelberg: Springer.
  • Watson, A.,  Jones, K. and Pratt, D. (2013)  Key Ideas in Teaching Mathematics: Research-based guidance for ages 9-19 (Oxford University Press + Nuffield website)
  • Watson and P. Winbourne (eds.) (2007) New Directions for Situated Cognition in Learning Mathematics, pub. Springer
  • Watson, A. (2006) Raising Achievement in Secondary Mathematics Maidenhead, Open University Press
  • Watson, A. and Mason, J. (2005) Mathematics as a constructive activity: learners generating examples. Lawrence Erlbaum Publishers.

David Phillips is Emeritus Professor of Comparative Education, and Emeritus Fellow of St Edmund Hall.

A linguist by origin, David Phillips now works exclusively on various aspects of comparative and international education, with a particular focus on policy issues in historical context. He is the author of many publications, especially on education in Germany (more particularly in the post-war and post-unification periods) and on policy ‘borrowing’ in education. He has edited  Comparative Education, Research in Comparative and International Education, and the Oxford Review of Education and  and serves on the editorial boards of various other journals; he also edits the book series Oxford Studies in Comparative Education. He is co-chair of the Anglo-German Educational Research Group (www.aerg.org)

He has been Chair of the British Association for Comparative and International Education (BAICE). In 1990-91 he served on a commission of the German Wissenschaftsrat which reported to the German government on the future of teacher education in the territory of the former German Democratic Republic, and he has (2003-4) been a member of a commission appointed by the Minister for Science, Culture and the Arts in Baden-Württemberg with the task of evaluating educational studies in higher education in that state of the Federal Republic of Germany. He has evaluated projects for the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft and for other research bodies. He is a Fellow of the Social Sciences Academy and a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society.

Professor Phillips’s main teaching involved theoretical and methodological issues in comparative education, educational policy in Western Europe (particularly EU countries) and in Eastern Europe, in Japan, and in the United States. Many of his doctoral students focused on education in Germany and Japan, and on a range of topics involving education and training policy in the European Union as well as on aspects of educational policy borrowing in a variety of contexts.

Publications
  • Zur Universitätsreform in der Britischen Besatzungszone 1945-1948, Böhlau 1983
  • (Editor): Hochschuloffiziere und Wiederaufbau des Hochschulwesens in Westdeutschland 1945-1952, Teil 1: Die Britische Zone, Lax, 1990
  • (Editor): Lessons of Cross-National Comparison in Education, Triangle Books, 1992
  • (Editor, with Michael Kaser): Education and Economic Change in Eastern Europe, Triangle Books, 1992
  • Pragmatismus und Idealismus: Das ‘Blaue Gutachten’ und die Britische Hochschulpolitik in Deutschland 1948, Böhlau, 1995
  • (Editor, with others): Education for Reconstruction, Symposium Books, 1998
  • (Editor): Education in Germany: Tradition and Reform in Historical Context, Routledge, 1995
  • (Editor, with Michael Kaser): Aspects of Education and the European Union, Triangle Books, 1995
  • (Editor, with others): Learning From Comparing: New Directions in Comparative Educational Research , Vol. 1, Contexts, Classrooms and Outcomes, Symposium Books, 1999 (with Robin Alexander and Patricia Broadfoot); Vol.2, Policy, Professionals and Development,: Symposium Books, 2000 (with Robin Alexander and Marilyn Osborn)
  • (Editor): Education in Eastern Germany Since Unification, Symposium Books, 2000
  • ‘Reconstructing Education in Germany: Some Similarities and Contrasts in the Post-War and Post-Unification Rethinking in Educational Provision’, in: Leslie J. Limage (ed): Democratizing Education and Educating Democratic Citizens: International and Historical Perspectives, New York (Routledge/Falmer), 2001
  • ‘Helena Deneke and the Women of Germany. A Note on Post-War Reconstruction’, German Life and Letters, Vol.53 No.1, 2000
  • Reflections on British Interest in Education in Germany in the Nineteenth Century. (A Progress Report), Educa, Lisbon, 2002
  • ‘Comparative Historical Studies in Education: Problems of Periodisation Reconsidered’, British Journal of Educational Studies, Vol.50, No.3, 2002
  • ‘Beyond Travellers’ Tales: Some Nineteenth-Century British Commentators on Education in Germany’, Oxford Review of Education, Vol.26 No.1, 2000
  • ‘Comparative Studies and “Cross-National Attraction” in Education: a typology for the analysis of English interest in educational policy and provision in Germany, Educational Studies, Vol.28, No.4, 2002 (with Kimberly Ochs)
  • ‘Processes of Policy Borrowing in Education: Some Explanatory and Analytical Devices, (with Kimberly Ochs), Comparative Education, Vol. 39, No.4, 2003
  • (Editor, with Roger Goodman): Can the Japanese Change Their Education System? Symposium Books, 2003
  • (Editor, with Hubert Ertl): Implementing European Union Education and Training Policy: A Comparative Study of Issues in Four Member States, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2003
  • Articles on ‘Helena Deneke’, ‘Evelyn Spearing’, and ‘Edith Wardale’, New Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004
  • ‘Researching Policy Borrowing: Some Methodological Problems in Comparative Education’, British Educational Research Journal, Vol.30 No.6, 2004 (with Kimberly Ochs)
  • ‘A Typology of Cross-National Attraction in Education’, in: Gita Steiner-Khamsi (ed.): The Global Politics of Educational Borrowing and Lending, Teachers College Press, 2004
  • (Editor, with Kimberly Ochs): Educational Policy Borrowing: Historical Perspectives, Symposium Books, 2004
  • ‘Policy Borrowing in Education: Frameworks for Analysis’, in: Joseph Zajda (ed.): International Handbook on Globalisation, Education and Policy Research: Global Pedagogies and Policies, Springer, 2005
  • ‘Comparative Education: An Approach to Educational Inquiry’, in: Clifton Conrad and Ronald Serlin (eds.): The Sage Handbook on Research in Education: Engaging Ideas and Enriching Inquiry, Sage, 2005
  • ‘Michael Sadler and Comparative Education’, Oxford Review of Education, Vol. 32, No.1, 2006
  • Comparative and International Education: An Introduction to Theory, Method and Practice, Continuum, 2006 (with Michele Schweisfurth)
  • (Editor): Special issue of Comparative Education on ‘Mapping EU Education and Training Policy’, Vol.42, No.1, 2006
  • (Editor): Special issue of Oxford Review of Education on ‘Comparative Inquiry and Educational Policy Making’, Vol.42, No.3, 2006
  • The German Example: English Interest in Educational Provision in Germany Since 1800, Continuum 2011
  • ‘Aspects of Education for Democratic Citizenship in Post-War Germany, Oxford Review of Education, Vol.38, No.6, 2012
  • Investigating Education in Germany: Historical Studies from a British Perspective, Routledge 2015
  • Educating the Germans. People and Policy in the British Zone of Germany, 1945-1949, 2018
Research

David Phillips’s main research interests are in education in Germany, transition in education in eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, educational policy ‘borrowing’, theoretical perspectives in comparative education, and EU education and training policy.

Much of David Phillips’s recent research has been in the area of educational policy borrowing and in EU education and training policy. He recently (1998-2002 inclusive) directed a five-year EU-funded project (PRESTIGE – ‘Problems of Educational Standardisation and Transition in a Global environment’) in this latter area, and oversaw and contributed to the many publications which emerged from the project. Currently the focus of his work is on British interest in educational provision in Germany over the past 200 years. In 2005, together with Alis Oancea, he organised an international seminar funded by the European Science Foundation on the subject ‘15 Years On: Post-communist transitions and European integration of central and eastern European Countries’.

One of his recent books is The German Example: English Interest in Educational Provision in Germany Since 1800 (Continuum,2011), and he has most recently published Educating the Germans, a study of British educational policy in occupied Germany, 1945-1949.  The research for this book was supported by a Leverhulme Trust Emeritus Fellowship awarded in 2012. In 2015 Routledge published Investigating Education in Germany: Historical Studies from a British Perspective. 

Professor of Sociology of Education in the Department of Education from 2010-2015, and before that Director of the Centre for Educational Sociology (CES), University of Edinburgh, Jenny also worked at Strathcyde, Keele, UWE Bristol, and the Open University.

She is an Honorary Professorial Visiting Fellow in the School of Social and Political Sciences, the University of Edinburgh, and has an attachment to the University of Umea, Sweden. She is a Fellow of the British Academy and has been a visiting scholar at Helsinki University, Finland. She holds an honorary doctorate from Turku University, Finland and is a member of the ESF College of Expert Reviewers. She teaches on the EU funded summer school in European Education Studies (SUSEES). The MOOC may be accessed here http://www.susees.eu/mooc-2017-lecture-2-governing-education-europe-changing-role-knowledge/

Research

Jenny’s most recent funded research was a Leverhulme Emeritus Fellowship, on Governing Education: knowledge and policy in England and Scotland since 1986. The study investigates the changing relationship between knowledge and policy in governing education in the period 1986-2015 in England and Scotland.

Jenny also continues to research and publish on education policy with a focus on governance and governing, through investigation of the resources that are being mobilized by new governing forms and through new policy technologies. She works in collaboration with colleagues in the UK and Europe, located in a variety of disciplines-including political science and social policy.

Publications
Recent books
  • Ozga, J (2016) (ed) Sage Library of Educational Thought and Practice: Sociology of Education (four volumes)
  • Fenwick. T., Mangez, E., and Ozga.J. (Eds) (2014) Governing Knowledge: Comparison, Knowledge-Based Technologies and Expertise in the Regulation of Education, (World Yearbook of Education 2014) London, Routledge
  • 2011: Fabricating Quality in Europe: data and education governance (edited with Peter Dahler-Larsen, Christina Segerholm and Hannu Simola London, Routledge
  • 2007: Lingard, B and Ozga, J (eds) The Routledge Reader in Education Policy and Politics, London, Routledge.
  • 2006: Ozga, J. Seddon T and Popkewitz T.S. (eds) Research and Policy: steering the knowledge-based Economy (World Yearbook of Education 2006) London, Routledge
Recent articles
  • Ozga, Jenny (2021) Problematising policy: the development of (critical) policy sociology, Critical Studies in Education, 62:3, 290-305, DOI: 10.1080/17508487.2019.1697718
  • Ozga, Jenny (2021) Who governs? Political leadership in transnational times, School Leadership & Management, 41:1-2, 6-21, DOI: 10.1080/13632434.2020.1789857
  • Ozga, Jenny (2020) The politics of accountability. Journal of Educational Change 21, 19–35 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10833-019-09354-2
  • Ozga, Jenny, & Arnott, M. A. (2019). Governando para além do PISA: conhecimento, redes e narrativas. [Governing Beyond PISA: knowledge, networks and narratives] Roteiro,44(3), 1-22. https://doi.org/10.18593/r.v44i3.21004
  • Ozga, J (2017) ‘Education policy should not be driven by performance data’ Nature: Human Behaviour Vol 1 Issue 1 http://www.nature.com/articles/s41562-016-0014
  • Ozga, Jenny (2016) Trust in numbers? Digital Education Governance and the inspection process  European Educational Research Journal Vol. 15(1) 69–81
  • Margaret Arnott & Jenny Ozga (2016) Education and nationalism in Scotland: governing a ‘learning nation’, Oxford Review of Education, 42:3, 253-265, DOI: 10.1080/03054985.2016.1184865
  • Ozga J and Lawn, M (2014) Frameworks of Regulation: Evidence, Knowledge and Judgement in Inspection Introduction to Special issue of Sisyphus, Journal of Education Volume 2 Issue 1 pp 7-16 (available at http://revista.rcap.pt/sisyphus)
  • Ozga, J (2014) Knowledge, Inspection and the Work of Governing Special issue of Sisyphus, Journal of Education Volume 2 Issue 1 pp16-40 (available at http://revista.rcap.pt/sisyphus)
  • Ozga, J and Lawn, M (2014) Inspectorates and Politics-the trajectories of inspection in England and Scotland  Revue Francaise de Pedagogie 186 pp11-23
  • Ozga, J Baxter, J, Clarke, J. Grek, S and Lawn M (2013) ‘The Politics of Educational Change: Governing and School Inspection in England and Scotland’ Swiss Journal of Sociology 39(2) 205-224.
  • Ozga J (2013) ‘Accountability as a Policy Technology: accounting for education performance in Europe’ International Review of Administrative Science 79 (2) 292-309.
  • Grek, S Lawn, M Ozga, J and Segerholm, C (2013) ‘Governing by Inspection? European Inspectorates and the creation of a European Education Policy Space Comparative Education, 49 (4) 486-502
  • Grek S and Ozga J (2012) Governing through Learning: School Self-Evaluation as a Knowledge-based Regulatory Tool. Recherches sociologiques et anthropologiqes 2012/2 83-103
  • Ozga J (2012) ‘Governing knowledge: data, inspection and education policy in Europe’ Globalisation, Societies and Education
  • Ozga J (2011) Knowledge Stocks and Flows: Data and Education Governance in Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities (Eds) Tara Fenwick and Lesley Farrell, London Routledge
  • Ozga J (2011) Governing Narratives: ‘local’ meanings and globalising education policy Education Inquiry 2 (2) June pp 305-318
  • Ozga J (2011) ‘Knowledge Transfer and Transformation: moving knowledge from research to policy’  PERSPECTIVA, Florianópolis, v. 29, n. 1, 49-67, jan./jun. 2011
  • Ozga J (2011) Researching the Powerful: Seeking Knowledge about Policy European Educational Research Journal Volume 10 Number 2 2011 pp 218-224
  • Arnott, M.A. & Ozga, J. (2010) ‘Nationalism, Governance and Policy Making: The SNP in Power’ Public Money and Management, vol.30 no.2 pp.91-97
  • Arnott, M. and Ozga J. (2010) Education and Nationalism: the discourse of education policy in Scotland Discourse 31(3 ) 335-350
  • Grek S and Ozga J (2010) Governing Education through Data: Scotland, England and the European Education Policy Space British Education Research Journal 36 (6) 937-952
  • Grek, S. and Ozga, J. (2010) ‘Re-inventing Public Education: the new role of knowledge in education policy-making’, Public Policy and Administration 25 (3) 271-288
  • Ozga, J. (2009) Governing Education through Data in England: From Regulation to Self-Evaluation, Special Issue of Journal of Education Policy, 24(2) 149-163
  • Grek, S.,Lawn M, Lingard, B Ozga, J. Rinne, R., Segerholm, C.and Simola, H. (2009) ‘National policy brokering and the construction of the European Education Space in England, Sweden, Finland and Scotland’  Comparative Education 45(1) 5-22
  • Ozga J (2008) Governing Knowledge: research steering and research quality, European  Educational Research Journal, 7(3), pp.261-272.
  • Byrne D and Ozga J (2008) Education Research and Policy Research Papers in Education, 23(4), pp.377-407
  • Ozga, J (2007) Knowledge and Policy: Research and Knowledge Transfer Critical Studies in Education 48 (1) pp63-78
Recent book chapters
  • Ozga, Jenny (2020) Elites and Expertise: The Changing Material Production of Knowledge for Policy in Fan, Guorui and Popkewitz, Thomas (Eds.) Handbook of Education Policy Studies volume 1 Values, Governance, Globalization, and Methodology (https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9789811383465)
  • Ozga, J (2019) ‘Governing and Knowledge: Theorising the Relationship’ in Langer, R and Brusemeister, T Handbuch Educational Governance Theorien Springer
  • Ozga J (2017) ‘Education and Nationalism in Scotland: nationalism as a governing resource’ in Kantasalmi, K and Holm, G (eds) The State, Schooling and Identity Singapore, Palgrave Macmillan/Springer
  • Ozga, Jenny (2015) Working Knowledge: Data, Expertise and Inspection in the Governing of Education in Kotthoff H-G and Klerides, E (eds) Governing Educational Spaces Knowledge, Teaching, and Learning in Transition Rotterdam, Sense Publishers  pp 15-35 https://www.sensepublishers.com/media/2526-governing-educational-spaces.pdf
  • Ozga J and Dubois-Shaik F (2015) ‘Referencing Europe:usages  of Europe in National Identity Projects’ in Carter, C and Lawn, M (eds) Governing Europe’s Spaces: European Union Re-imagined Manchester, Manchester University Press
  • Ozga J and Segerholm C (2015) Neo-Liberal Agendas in Education in Grek, S and Lindgren, J (eds) Governing by Inspection Routledge pp27-38
  • Ozga J, Lawn M (2015) The History and Development of Inspectorates in England, Sweden and Scotland in Grek, S and Lindgren, J (eds) Governing by Inspection Routledge pp58-74
  • Lawn M and Ozga J (2012) Making Good Progress? Governing by Inspection: a post-comparative approach. Helsinki, Finnish Education Research Association.
  • Arnott M and Ozga J  (2012) ‘Education, Nationalism and Social Justice in Scott, G. & Mooney, G. (eds) Social Justice and Social Policy: the Politics of Social Policy in Scotland, Bristol, Policy Press
  • Ozga J (2012) ‘Trans-national Technologies and National Contexts: a Comparative Analysis of Education Policy in Scotland and England’ in Kauko, J Rinne R & Kynkäänniemi H (eds) Restructuring the Truth of Schooling – Essays on Discursive Practices in Sociology and the Politics of Education Helsinki, Finnish Educational Research Association
  • Arnott m and Ozga J (2010) ‘Education Policy & the SNP Government’ in Scott, G. & Mooney, G. (eds) (2010) Politics of Social Policy in Scotland, Policy Press

Ian is former President of BERA, 2013-2015. At OUDE he was Director of Professional Programmes and led the development of the Oxford Education Deanery.Before moving to Oxford, Ian was Professor of Teacher Education at the University of Glasgow. Prior to that he held posts at the University of the West of Scotland (Dean of Education and Media), London Metropolitan University (Head of School of Education), University of the West of England and the University of Gloucestershire.

Ian was President of the Scottish Educational Research Association from 2005–07 and chaired the Research and Development Committee of the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers from 2008-11. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts and is a Visiting Professor at Bath Spa University and Ulster University and an Honorary Professor at the University of Exeter. Since 2018 he has been a Senior Research Associate at Kazan Federal University, Russia.

Publications
Books
  • Menter, I., Muschamp, Y., Nicholls, P., Ozga, J. with Pollard, A. (1997) Work and Identity in the Primary School: A Post-Fordist Analysis Buckingham: Open University Press
  • Menter, I., Brisard, E. and Smith, I. (2006) Convergence or Divergence?: Initial teacher education in Scotland and England Edinburgh: Dunedin Academic Press.
  • Menter, I. and Murray, J. (eds.) (2011) Developing Research in Teacher Education, London: Routledge.
  • Menter, I., Elliot, D., Hulme, M., Lewin, J. and Lowden, K. (2011) A Guide to Practitioner Research in Education, London: Sage.
  • The Teacher Education Group (2015) Teacher Education in Times of Change. Bristol: Policy Press.
  • Peters, M., Cowie, B and Menter, I. (eds.) (2017) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education Research. Singapore: Springer.
  • Childs, A. and Menter, I. (eds.) (2018) Mobilising Teacher Researchers: challenging educational inequality. London: Routledge
  • Tatto, M.T. and Menter, I. (eds.) (2019) Knowledge, Policy and Practice in Teacher Education – A Cross-National Study. London: Bloomsbury.
Recent research reports
  • 2009 Final Report Curriculum for Excellence Draft Experiences and Outcomes: Collection, analysis and reporting of data for Learning and Teaching Scotland (Menter, I., Baumfield, V., Hulme, M., Devlin, A., Ellott, D., Hall, J., Hall, S. and Lowden, K.)
  • 2010 ‘Teachers: formation, training and identity’ (A literature review for Culture, Creativity and Education) (Menter, I.)
  • 2010 Literature Review on Teacher Education in the 21stCentury, Edinburgh: The Scottish Government. (Menter, I.,Hulme, M., Elliot, D. and Lewin, J.)
  • 2010 Research to support Schools of Ambition: Final Report, Edinburgh: The Scottish Government (Menter, I., Hulme, M., Christie, D., Payne, F., Coutts, N., Robson, D. and Spratt, J.)
  • 2011 Research to support Schools of Ambition: Final Report, Edinburgh: The Scottish Government (Menter, I., Hulme, M., Christie, D., Payne, F., Coutts, N., Robson, D. and Spratt, J.)
  • 2011 The Glasgow West Teacher Education Initiative: A Clinical Approach to Teacher Education. Evaluation Report. (Menter. I., Baumfield, V., Carroll, M., Dickson, B., Hulme, M., Lowden, K. and Mallon, W.) University of Glasgow.
  • 2012 The Glasgow West Teacher Education Initiative: Evaluation of second phase. Menter, I. and Lowden, K. Glasgow: The University of Glasgow.
  • 2013 Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools, funded by Citi Foundation (Aexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. and Menter, I.)
  • 2017 The role and contribution of higher education in contemporary teacher education. (Menter, I.) Commissioned by the Scottish Council of Deans of Education.
Recent book chapters
  • Menter, I. (2016) Teacher education – making connections with curriculum, pedagogy and assessment. In: Wyse, D., Hayward, L. and Pandya, J. (Eds.) The Sage Handbook of Curriculum, Pedagogy and Assessment. London: SAGE. pp 1015-1028.
  • Menter, I. (2016) ‘Foreword’ to Beckett, L. Teachers and Academic Partners in Urban Schools. London: Routledge.
  • Menter, I. and Walker, M. (2016) ‘School and society’ in Wyse, D. and Rogers, S. (Eds.) A Guide to Early Years and Primary Teaching. London: Sage.
  • Menter, I. (2016) Teacher education: generator of change or a mechanism for conformity? in Lees, H. and Noddings, N. (eds.) The Palgrave International Handbook of Alternative Education. London: Palgrave. 257-272.
  • Menter, I. (2017) ‘Reasons for education research’. In Wyse, D., Selwyn, N., Smith, E. and Suter, L. (Eds.) The BERA/SAGE Handbook of Educational Research. London: Sage. pp. 37-52.
  • Menter, I. (2017) ‘Diversity, development, devolution: the three Ds of UK teacher education and professional development in the twenty-first century’. In Florian, L. and Pantic, N. (Eds.) Teacher Education for the Changing Demographics of Schooling – Issues for research and practice. Cham, Switzerland: Springer. pp39-51.
  • Menter, I. (2017) ‘Teacher Education Research’ In Oxford Encyclopedia of Education. Oxford University Press. DOI: 10.1093/acrefore/9780190264093.013.275
  • Menter, I. (2018) ‘Teacher education in a crucible of change’ in Smith, L. and Wyatt, C. (Eds.) Innovation and Accountability in Teacher Education: Setting directions for new cultures in teacher education. Singapore: Springer. pp313-326.
  • Menter, I. and Reynolds, K. (2019) ‘Diversity in Teacher Education: Afterword’ In Sorensen, N. (Ed.) Diversity in Teacher Education. London: UCL IoE Books.
Recent journal articles
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. and Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: The Development of the Oxford Education Deanery Narrative. Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373.
  • Menter, I. (2015) Unity or disunity in the United Kingdom? Policy and practice in teacher education. Education and Self-Development. 2 (44),156-164.
  • Thompson, I., McNicholl, J. and Menter, I. (2016) Student teachers’ perceptions of poverty and educational achievement, Oxford Review of Education 42, 2, 214-229 DOI: 10.1080/03054985.2016.1164130
  • Menter, I. (2016) Helga Eng lecture 2015: What is a teacher in the 21st century and what does a 21st century teacher need to know? Acta Didactica Norge,10, 2, 11-25.
  • Lynch, D., Smith, R. and Menter, I. (2016) Reforming teacher education: from partnership to ‘syndication’. International Journal of Innovation, Creativity and Change. www.ijicc.net Volume 2, Issue 3.
  • Mutton, T., Burn, K. and Menter, I. (2017) Deconstructing the Carter Review: Competing conceptions of quality in England’s ‘school-led’ system of initial teacher education. Journal of Education Policy. 32, 1, 14-33. DOI: 10.1080/02680939.2016.1214751
  • Menter, I. (2017) Competences and Standards for Teachers and Teacher Education – Developments and Problems – a common approach for the United Kingdom? 26th Bulletin of the Japanese Society for the Study of Teacher Education. 8-19.
  • Menter, I., Valeeva, R. and Kalimullin, A. (2017) A tale of two countries – forty years on: politics and teacher education in Russia and England. European Journal of Teacher Education. 40, 5, 616-629.
  • Whiting, C., Whitty, G., Menter, I., Black, P., Hordern, J., Parfitt, A., Reynolds, K. and Sorenson, N. (2018) Diversity and Complexity: Becoming a teacher in England in 2015-16. Review of Education 6, 1, 69-96.
  • Menter, I. (2018) Defining teachers’ professional knowledge: the interaction of global and national influences. Education and Self-Development.13, 1, 32-42.
  • Loughran, J. and Menter, I. (2019) The essence of being a teacher educator and why it matters, Asia-Pacific Journal of Teacher Education, DOI:10.1080/1359866X.2019.1575946
Research and professional activity

Ian’s research interests are in teacher education and teachers’ work, with a particular interest in policy. He has carried out a number of ‘home international’ comparative studies within the UK, including ESRC-sponsored initiatives and has led projects commissioned by the Scottish Government and The National College for School Leadership. He led a research support team from OUDE working on the National College for Teaching and Leadership project, Closing the Gap – Test and Learn. He was also Director of the Oxford City Council funded Leadership for Learning project, working in city primary schools.

Ian is a founding editor of Review of Education, a journal of the British Educational Research Association, launched in 2013. He is series editor for Critical Guides for Teacher Educators, published by Critical Publishing. He is a founder member of two UK-wide research groups, TEG (Teacher Education Group) and CAPeR-UK (Curricululum, Assessment and Pedagogy Reform across the UK), as well as the OUDE –led research group on Poverty and Teacher Education. He was also a member of the steering group for the BERA-RSA Inquiry into Research and Teacher Education.

Ken Mayhew is Emeritus Professor of Education and Economic Performance and Emeritus Fellow of Pembroke College, Oxford.

He is an Extraordinary Professor at Maastricht University, a Director of the Centre for Tutorial Teaching and has recently finished a term as a member of the Department for Education’s Skills and Productivity Board. He was the founding Director of SKOPE, a multi-disciplinary centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, based in the Oxford Department of Education.
Ken is also currently a member of the ESRC’s College of Peer Reviewers; the Expert Group for CEDEFOP’s European Training and Learning Survey; the Expert Working Group for Cedefop’s Second European Skills and Jobs Survey; Bright Blue’s Commission on the Welfare System after the COVID 19 Pandemic. He is an editor of Oxford Economic Papers

Ken obtained a First in Modern History at Worcester College, Oxford and took a Masters in Economics at LSE. After graduate school he joined Her Majesty’s Treasury before moving to Oxford. In 1989 and 1990 he was Economic Director at the UK National Economic Development Office, and has worked as a consultant for many private and public sector organisations at home and abroad. In the UK these include the Department of Education and Skills, the Department of Trade and Industry, DEFRA, the Skills Funding Agency, the CIPD and the Confederation of British Industry. Abroad they include the EU, the Polish, Belgian and Omani Governments, SIK (Sweden) and Group Training Australia. He was on the Academic Advisory Board of the National Skills Taskforce and Chair of an expert group advising the OECD on the background questionnaire for PIAAC. His major research interests are in labour economics, human resource management and the economics of education and training. He has published widely in these areas.

Ken Mayhew would welcome informal contacts from prospective students interested in the following topics:

• The economics of education
• Transitions from the education system to the labour market
• Work-based training and learning
• Education and social mobility
• The labour market

Research

Ken’s current research is mainly in six areas: transitions from education into the labour market; the economics of work-based training; the economics of higher education; low paid work in the UK and Europe; the labour market as a social model; inequality with special emphasis on regional inequality.

Featured publications
  •  Oxford Handbook of Skills and Training, Oxford University Press, 2017 (with J. Buchanan, D. Finegold and C. Warhurst)
  • “Educating for a cooperative society –building human and social capital: the role of government” in G. Redding, A. Drew and S. Crump (eds), The Oxford Handbook of Higher Education Systems and University Management, 2019
  • “Inequality”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 2019 (with S. Wills)
  • Holmes, C, Mayhew, K (2016) “The economics of higher education”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 32(4) 475-496.
  • Mayhew, K, Holmes, C (2015) Over-qualification and skills mismatch in the graduate labour market. London: CIPD.
  • Mayhew, K (2015) “UK labour market policy then and now”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy.
  • “BREXIT and higher education” (2022) Oxford Review of Economic Policy
  • “What accounts for changes in the chances of being NEET in the UK?” (2021) Journal of Education and Work (with C. Holmes and E. Murphy)
  • Higher education and the labour market” (2020) Oxford Review of Education (with H. Lauder)
Books
  • Oxford Handbook of Skills and Training, Oxford University Press, paperback edition 2018 (with J. Buchanan, D. Finegold and C. Warhurst)
  • Oxford Handbook of Skills and Training, Oxford University Press, 2017 (with J. Buchanan, D. Finegold and C. Warhurst)
  • Appelbaum, E, Bosch, G, Gautié, J, Mason, G, Mayhew, K, Salverda, W, Schmitt, J, Westergaard-Nielsen, N (2010) Introduction and overview.
  • LLoyd, C, Mason, G, Mayhew, K (2008) Low-Wage Work in the United Kingdom. Russell Sage Foundation.
  • Grip, AD, Loo, JV, Mayhew, K (2002) The Economics of Skills Obsolescence Theoretical Innovations and Empirical Applications. Jai.
  • Mayhew, K, Fenn, P, McGuire, A (1994) Providing Health Care. Oxford: OUP.
  • Mayhew, K, Layard, R, Owen, G (1994) Britain’s Training Deficit. Avebury Publishing.
  • Bowen, A, Mayhew, K (1991) Reducing Regional Inequalities.
  • Fenn, P, McGuire, A, Mayhew, K (1991) Providing Health Care. Oxford: OUP.
  • Bowen, A, Mayhew, K (1990) Improving Incentives for the Low-Paid. Springer.
  • Mayhew, K (1983) Trade Unions and the Labour Market. Blackwell Pub.
  • Robinson, DJS, Mayhew, K (1983) Pay policies for the future.
Book chapters
  • “NEETS in England”, in M. Levels, C. Brzinsky-Fay, C. Holmes and J. Jongbloed (eds), The Dynamics of Marginalised Youth, Routledge, 2022 (with C. Holmes, L. Wright, E. Murphy, E. Keep and S. Maguire)
  • “Derek Robinson” in R. Cord (ed), The Palgrave Companion to Oxford Economics, Palgrave, 2021
  • “What, if anything, can we learn from Germany, Switzerland, Austria, the Netherlands and Denmark?”, in D. Goodhart (ed.), The Training We Need Now, Policy Exchange, 2020
  • “Educating for a cooperative society –building human and social capital: the role of government” in G. Redding, A. Drew and S. Crump (eds), The Oxford Handbook of Higher Education Systems and University Management, 2019
  • “The economic and social benefits of skills” in Oxford Handbook of Skills and Training, 2017 (with I Grugulis and C. Holmes)
  • “Skills and training: the landscape” in Oxford Handbook of Skills and Training, 2017 (with J. Buchanan, D. Finegold and C. Warhurst)
  • Mayhew, K, Wickham-Jones, M (2014) “The UK’s Social Model from New Deal to Economic Crisis”, In: J-E Dolvik, A Martin (eds.) European Social Models from Crisis to Crisis: Employment and Inequality in an Era of Monetary Integration.Oxford: OUP.
  • Holmes, C, Mayhew, K (2014) “The winners and losers in the ‘hourglass’ labour market”, In: Understanding Employer Engagement in Education: Theories and Evidence. 92-113
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.4324/9781315779966
  • Mayhew, K (2010) “Comment on Anderson and Ruhs”, In: B Anderson, M Ruhs (eds.) Who Needs Migrant Workers: Labour Shortages, Immigration and Public Policy.
  • Gautié, J, Westergaard-Nielsen, N, Schmitt, J, Mayhew, K (2010) “The impact of institutions on the supply side of the low-wage labor market”, In: Low-Wage Work in the Wealthy World. 147-182
  • Bosch, G, Mayhew, K, Gautié, J (2010) “Industrial relations, legal regulations, and wage setting”, In: Low-Wage Work in the Wealthy World. 91-146
  • Mayhew, K, Keep, E (2009) “Knowledge, skills and competitiveness”, In: F Rauner, R Maclean (eds.) Handbook of TVET Research.
  • Mayhew, K, Mason, G, Osborne, M, Stevens, P (2008) “Low pay, labour market institutions and job quality”, In: C Lloyd, G Mason, K Mayhew (eds.) Low Wage Work in the UK. New York: Russell Sage.
  • Mayhew, K, Mason, G (2008) “Low paid work in the UK: an overview”, In: C Lloyd, G Mason, K Mayhew (eds.) Low Wage Work in the UK. New York: Russell Sage.
  • Mayhew, K, Deer, C (2007) “The changing nature and context of higher education in the UK”, In: T Butler, M Dane (eds.) Reflections on Change.
  • Mayhew, K (2005) How to improve the human capital of older workers. Paris: OECD.
  • Mayhew, K, de Grip, A, van Loo, J (2002) “The economics of skills obsolescence”, In: A de Grip, J van Loo, K Mayhew (eds.) The Economics of Skills Obsolescence: Theoretical Innovations and Empirical Applications. Jai.
  • Mayhew, K (2002) “The high skills vision”, In: A Jolly (ed.) Skills and Training Directory. Kogan Page.
  • Mayhew, K (2002) “Higher education – size matters”, In: G Hayward, S James (eds.) Growing Higher Education: Expansion or Hyperinflation.
  • Mayhew, K, Holtham, G, Ingram, P (1998) “The long term unemployed – what more can be done?”, In:J McCormick, C Oppenheim (eds.) Welfare in Working Order. London: IPPR.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1998) “Vocational Education and Training and Economic Performance”, In: T Buxton, P Chapman, J Temple (eds.) Britain’s Economic Performance. 2nd edition. London: Routledge. 367-395
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1998) “Training and Development”, In: S Fox (ed.) The European business environment UK. London: Thomson Business Press. 219-241
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1996) “UK Training Policy – Assumptions and Reality”, In: A Booth, DJ Snower (eds.) Acquiring Skills Market Failures, Their Symptoms and Policy Responses. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 303-334
  • Mayhew, K, Ingram, P, Guest, D (1996) “How do we think about pay?”, In: H Murlis (ed.) Pay at the Crossroads. London: IPD.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1996) “Training for the Unemployed”, In: P Meadows (ed.) Work out – or Work in? Contributions to the debate on the future of work. York: Joseph Rowntree Foundation. 140-155
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1995) “The Economic Demand for Higher Education, and Investing in People – Two Aspects of Sustainable Development in British Higher Education”, In: F Coffield (ed.) Higher Education in a Learning Society. Durham: Durham University School of Education. 81-110
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1995) Training Policy for Competitiveness – Time for a Fresh Perspective? London: Policy Studies Institute. 110-145
  • Mayhew, K, Layard, R, Owen, G (1994) “Why we need a Training Reform Act”, In: K Mayhew, R Layard, G Owen (eds.) Britain’s Training Deficit. Avebury.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1994) “The Changing Structure of Training Provision”, In: T Buxton, P Chapman, P Temple (eds.) Britain’s Economic Performance. London: Routledge.
  • Mayhew, K, Anderton, R (1994) “A comparative analysis of the UK labour market”, In: R Barrell (ed.) The UK Labour Market: Comparative Aspects and Institutional Developments. Cambridge University Press.
  • Mayhew, K (1994) “Pay policies in the private sector: an international overview”, In: M Lavender (ed.) International Pay Policies. London: Public Finance Foundation.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1993) “Training and the Labour Market”, In: C Trinder, P Jackson (eds.) The Public Services Yearbook 1993. London: Chapman and Hall. 169-190
  • Mayhew, K (1992) “Incomes policy”, In: New Palgrave Dictionary of Money and Finance. Palgrave.
  • Mayhew, K (1991) “Pay policies in the private sector: an international overview”, In: J Hawkins (ed.) International Pay Policies. London: Public Finance Foundation.
  • Mayhew, K, McGuire, A, Fenn, P (1991) “The economics of health care”, In: K Mayhew, A McGuire, P Fenn (eds.) Providing Health Care. Oxford: OUP.
  • Mayhew, K, Bowen, A (1991) “Regional economic disparities: some public policy issues”, In: K Mayhew, A Bowen (eds.) Reducing Regional Inequalities.
  • Mayhew, K (1991) “Training: the way ahead”, In: Employment Institute (ed.) Improving Britain’s Industrial Performance. Employment Institute.
  • Mayhew, K (1991) “Regional issues in economics: setting the scene”, In: K Mayhew, A Bowen (eds.) Reducing Regional Inequalities.
  • Keep, EJ (1990) “Training for the Low Paid”, In: A Bowen, K Mayhew (eds.) Improving Incentives for the Low-Paid. London: Macmillan/NEDO. 139-180
  • Mayhew, K, Ray, A (1990) “White collar pay and employment”, In: M Gregory, A Thompson (eds.) A Portrait of Pay. OUP.
  • Mayhew, K, Bowen, A (1990) “Incentives for the low paid: issues for public policy”, In: K Mayhew, A Bowen (eds.) Improving Incentives for the Low Paid.
  • Mayhew, K, Bowen, A, Brewer, D (1990) “Incentives for the low paid: setting the scene”, In: K Mayhew, A Bowen (eds.) Improving Incentives for the Low Paid.
  • Mayhew, K, Turnbull, P (1989) “Models of union behaviour”, In: R Perlman, R Drago (eds.) Microeconomic Issues in the Labour Market. Harvester.
  • Mayhew, K (1986) “Economists and immigration”, In: A Dummett (ed.) Towards a Just Immigration Policy.
  • Mayhew, K (1986) “Employee behaviour”, In: D Morris (ed.) The Economic System in the UK. OUP.
  • Mayhew, K, Addison, J (1983) “Discrimination in the labour market”, In: G Bain (ed.) Industrial relations in Britain. Blackwell.
  • Mayhew, K (1983) “Traditional incomes policies”, In: D Robinson, K Mayhew (eds.) Pay Policies for the Future.
  • Mayhew, K, Greenhalgh, C (1981) “Labour supply in Great Britain: theory and evidence”, In: Z Hornstein, J Grice (eds.) The Economics of the Labour Market. HMSO.
  • Mayhew, K (1981) “Incomes policy and the private sector”, In: R Elliott, L Fallick (eds.) Incomes Policy, Inflation and Relative Pay. George Allen and Unwin.
  • Mayhew, K (1981) “The institutional context of incomes policy”, In: R Chater, A Dean, R Elliott (eds.) Incomes Policies. OUP.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K “Education and Training”, In: C Trinder, P Jackson (eds.) Public Services Yearbook 1994. London: Chapman and Hall. 237-254
Conference papers
Journal articles
  • “BREXIT and UK higher education”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 2022
  • “Kurzarbeit/short time working: experiences and lessons from the COVID-induced downturn”, National Institute Economic Review, 2022 (with B. Casey)
  • “What accounts for changes in the chances of being NEET in the UK?”, Journal of Education and Work, 2021 (with C. Holmes and E. Murphy)
  • “Regional inequalities: causes and cures”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 2021 (with F. Corvers)
  • “COVID 19 and the labour market”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 2020 (with P. Anand)
  • “Higher education and the labour market”, Oxford Review of Education, 2020 (with H. Lauder)
  • Inequality”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 2019 (with S. Wills)
  • Mayhew, K (2017) “UK higher education and Brexit”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 33(1) S155-S161.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grx012
  • Mayhew, K (2016) “Human Capital, Growth and Inequality”, Welsh Economic Review. 24(0) 23-23.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.18573/j.2016.10052
  • Holmes, C, Mayhew, K (2016) “The economics of higher education”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 32(4) 475-496.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grw031
  • Mayhew, K (2015) “Derek Robinson (9 February 1932-1 September 2014)”, ECONOMIC AND LABOUR RELATIONS REVIEW.26(3) 490-492.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/1035304615597839
  • Laczik, A, Mayhew, K (2015) “Labour market developments and their significance for VET in England: Current concerns and debates”, Research in Comparative and International Education. 10(4) 558-575.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/1745499915615974
  • Mayhew, K (2015) “UK labour market policy then and now”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 31(2) 199-216.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grv017
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K (2014) “Inequality – ‘wicked problems’, labour market outcomes and the search for silver bullets”, OXFORD REVIEW OF EDUCATION. 40(6) 764-781.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/03054985.2014.979580
  • Mayhew, K (2013) “Government and business: an introduction”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 29(2) 249-260.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grt028
  • Cobham, D, Adam, C, Mayhew, K (2013) “The economic record of the 1997-2010 Labour government: an assessment”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 29(1) 1-24.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grt014
  • Amable, B, Mayhew, K (2011) “Unemployment in the OECD”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 27(2) 207-220.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grr019
  • Lloyd, C, Mayhew, K (2010) “Skill: the solution to low wage work?”, Industrial Relations Journal. 41(5) 429-445.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2338.2010.00578.x
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K (2010) “Moving beyond skills as a social and economic panacea”, WORK EMPLOYMENT AND SOCIETY. 24(3) 565-577.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0950017010371663
  • Salverda, W, Mayhew, K (2009) “Capitalist economies and wage inequality”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 25(1) 126-154.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grp008
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K, Payne, J (2006) “From skills revolution to productivity miracle – Not as easy as it sounds?”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 22(4) 539-559.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grj032
  • Mayhew, K, Neely, A (2006) “Improving productivity – Opening the black box”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 22(4) 445-456.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grj026
  • Mayhew, K, Deer, C, Dua, M (2004) “The move to mass higher education in the UK: many questions and some answers”, OXFORD REVIEW OF EDUCATION. 30(1) 65-82.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/0305498042000190069
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K (2004) “The economic and distributional implications of current policies on higher education”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 20(2) 298-314.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grh017
  • Gold, M, Charlwood, A, Müller-Camen, M, Lucas, R, Crowley, S, Heery, E, Benson, J, Mayhew, K, Bach, S, Moore, S, Finkin, M, Rowlinson, M, Beauregard, A (2002) “Book Reviews”, British Journal of Industrial Relations. 40 341-368.
  • Mayhew, K (2002) “The state of working Britain”, BRITISH JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS. 40(2) 355-357.
    Borghans, L, Green, F, Mayhew, K (2001) “Skills measurement and economic analysis: An introduction”, OXFORD ECONOMIC PAPERS-NEW SERIES. 53(3) 375-384.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oep/53.3.375
  • Mayhew, K (2000) “The assessment: Labour markets and welfare”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 16(1) 1-12.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/16.1.1
  • Felstead, A, Green, F, Pack, A, Mayhew, K (2000) “The Impact of Training on Labour”, British Journal of Industrial Relations. 38(2)
  • Green, F, Felstead, A, Mayhew, K, Pack, A (2000) “The impact of training on labour mobility: Individual and firm-level evidence from Britain”, BRITISH JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS. 38(2) 261-275.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/1467-8543.00162
  • Felstead, A, Green, F, Mayhew, K (1999) “Britain’s training statistics: A cautionary tale”, WORK EMPLOYMENT AND SOCIETY. 13(1) 107-115.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1017/S0950017099000070
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K (1999) “The assessment: Knowledge, skills, and competitiveness”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 15(1) 1-15.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/15.1.1
  • Mayhem, K (1997) “The Education and Training Mismatch”, Business Strategy Review. 8(2) 51-53.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/1467-8616.00022
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K (1996) “Towards a learning society — Definition and measurement”, Policy Studies. 17(3) 215-232.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/01442879608423708
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K (1996) “Economic Demand for Higher Education? A Sound Foundation for Further Expansion?”, Higher Education Quarterly. 50(2) 89-109.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2273.1996.tb01693.x
  • MAYHEW, K, SEABRIGHT, P (1992) “INCENTIVES AND THE MANAGEMENT OF ENTERPRISES IN ECONOMIC TRANSITION: CAPITAL MARKETS ARE NOT ENOUGH”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy. 8(1) 105-129.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/8.1.105
  • HELM, D, MAYER, C, MAYHEW, K (1991) “THE ASSESSMENT – MICROECONOMIC POLICY IN THE 1980S”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 7(3) 1-12.
  • MAYHEW, K (1991) “THE ECONOMICS OF HUMAN – RESOURCE MANAGEMENT – MITCHELL, DJB, ZAIDI, MA”, BRITISH JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS. 29(3) 534-535.
  • MAYHEW, K (1991) “THE ASSESSMENT – THE UK LABOR-MARKET IN THE 1980S”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 7(1) 1-17.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/7.1.1
  • McGUIRE, A, FENN, P, MAYHEW, K (1989) “THE ASSESSMENT: THE ECONOMICS OF HEALTH CARE”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy. 5(1) 1-20.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/5.1.1
  • KEEP, E, MAYHEW, E (1988) “THE ASSESSMENT: EDUCATION, TRAINING AND ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy. 4(3) 1-1.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/4.3.1-a
  • KNIGHT, JB, MAYHEW, K (1987) “WAGE DETERMINATION AND LABOR-MARKET INFLEXIBILITY – INTRODUCTION”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 49(1) 1-8.
  • MAYHEW, K (1986) “WAGE RESTRAINT BY CONSENSUS – BRITAIN SEARCH FOR AN INCOMES-POLICY AGREEMENT 1965-79 – FISHBEIN, WH”, JOURNAL OF ECONOMIC LITERATURE. 24(2) 694-695.
  • Mayhew, K (1985) “Reforming the labour market”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy. 1(2) 60-79.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/1.2.60
  • MAYHEW, K (1985) “ECONOMICS OF UNEMPLOYMENT – AN HISTORICAL-PERSPECTIVE – CASSON, M”, INDUSTRIAL & LABOR RELATIONS REVIEW. 38(4) 667-668.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.2307/2524010
  • ROBINSON, D, MAYHEW, K (1983) “SPECIAL ISSUE – PAY POLICIES FOR THE FUTURE – INTRODUCTION”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 45(1) 3-13.
  • MAYHEW, K (1983) “FAIRNESS, COLLECTIVE-BARGAINING, AND INCOMES-POLICY – WILLMAN, P”, MANCHESTER SCHOOL OF ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL STUDIES. 51(1) 105-106.
  • MAYHEW, K (1983) “TRADITIONAL INCOMES POLICIES”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 45(1) 15-32.
    ROBINSON, D, MAYHEW, K (1983) “SPECIAL ISSUE – PAY POLICIES FOR THE FUTURE – CONCLUSIONS”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 45(1) 127-139.
  • MAYHEW, K, ROSEWELL, B (1981) “OCCUPATIONAL-MOBILITY IN BRITAIN”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 43(3) 225-255.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1981.mp43003001.x
  • MAYHEW, K, ROSEWELL, B (1979) “LABOR-MARKET SEGMENTATION IN BRITAIN”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 41(2) 81-115.
  • MAYHEW, K (1979) “ECONOMISTS AND STRIKES”,OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 41(1) 1-19.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1979.mp41001001.x
  • MAYHEW, K, ROSEWELL, B (1978) “IMMIGRANTS AND OCCUPATIONAL CROWDING IN GREAT-BRITAIN”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 40(3) 223-248.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1978.mp40003003.x
  • MAYHEW, K (1977) “DEGREE OF UNIONIZATION 1948-68 – COMMENT”, BULLETIN OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH. 29(1) 51-53.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8586.1977.tb00409.x
  • MAYHEW, K (1977) “EARNINGS DISPERSION IN LOCAL LABOR-MARKETS – IMPLICATIONS FOR SEARCH BEHAVIOR”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 39(2) 93-107.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1977.mp39002001.x
  • MAYHEW, K (1976) “REGIONAL VARIATIONS OF MANUAL EARNINGS IN ENGINEERING”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 38(1) 11-25.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1976.mp38001002.x
  • MAYHEW, K (1976) “PLANT SIZE AND EARNINGS OF MANUAL WORKERS IN ENGINEERING”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 38(3) 149-160.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1976.mp38003001.x
  • MAYHEW, K (1975) “REVERSAL OF SKILL DIFFERENTIALS UNDER PAYMENT BY RESULTS SYSTEMS CASE OF ENGINEERING”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 37(4) 251-267.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1975.mp37004001.x
  • Mayhew, K “The resurgence of incomes policy”, Manpower Policy and Practice.
  • Mayhew, K, Rijkers, B “Improving the human capital of older workers”, Ageing Horizons.
  • Mayhew, K, Felstead, A, Green, F “Interpreting training statistics in Europe: issuing a health warning”, European Journal for Vocational Training.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K “Towards the knowledge-driven economy”, 7(4) 50-59.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K “Was Ratner Right? Product Market and Competitive Strategies and Their Links with Skills and Knowledge”, EPI Economic Report. 12(3) 1-14.
  • Mayhew, K “The Assessment: Labour Markets and Welfare”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Vol. 16.(1)
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/16.1.1
Reports
  • Alternative Pathways into the Labour Market, CIPD, 2016 (with Craig Holmes)
  • Wilde, S, James, SF, Mayhew, K (2015) Training Managers: Benefits from and barriers to WorldSkills UK participation. Oxford: Oxford University Consulting.
  • Mayhew, K, Holmes, C (2015) Over-qualification and skills mismatch in the graduate labour market. London: CIPD.
  • James Relly, SF, Holmes, C, Mayhew, K (2015) Learning environments to develop vocational excellence. http://vocationalexcellence.education.ox.ac.uk/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/Project-2-Phase-2-Final-Report-Learning-environments-to-develop-vocational-excellence.pdf:
  • Chankseliani, M, James Relly, S, Mayhew, K (2015) WorldSkills competitors and entrepreneurship: A Report to the Skills Funding Agency.
  • Chankseliani, M, James Relly, Susan, Mayhew, Ken (2015) “Benefits of Developing Vocational Excellence. A Report to the National Apprenticeship Service of Project 3 (Phase II) of the DUVE suite of projects”, In: Benefits of Developing Vocational Excellence. A Report to the National Apprenticeship Service of Project 3 (Phase II) of the DUVE suite of projects.
  • James Relly, SF, Allen, J, Mayhew, K (2015) Further education college participation in worldSkills and other competitions. http://vocationalexcellence.education.ox.ac.uk/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/Project-4-Further-education-college-participation-in-WorldSkills-and-other-skills-competitions.pdf:
  • James Relly, SF, Rodriguez Leal, T, Mayhew, K (2014) Interim Evaluation Report on the Skills Competition CPD Programme. Oxford: Oxford University Consulting.
  • James Relly, SF, Rodriguez Leal, T, Mayhew, K (2014) Final Evaluation Report on the Skills Competition CPD Programme. Oxford: Oxford University Consulting.
  • James, SF, Mayhew, K, Laczik, A, Mordarska, M (2013) Report on Apprenticeships, Employer Engagement and Vocational Formation in England. Oxford: Oxford University Consulting.
  • James, SF, Mayhew, K, Chankseliani, M, Laczik, A (2013) “Benefits of Developing Vocational Excellence. A Report to the National Apprenticeship Service. Oxford: SKOPE”, In: Benefits of Developing Vocational Excellence A Report to the National Apprenticeship Service of Project 3 of the DUVE suite of projects.
  • James, S, Holmes, C, Mayhew, K (2013) “Learning Environments to Develop vocational Excellence. Oxford: SKOPE”, In: A Report to the National Apprenticeship Service of Project 2 of the DUVE suite of projects. Oxford: SKOPE.
  • Mayhew, K, Holmes, C (2012) Is the UK labour market polarising. London: Resolution Foundation.
  • Holmes, C, Mayhew, K, Keep, EJ (2012) “Ten Big Questions for Higher Education”, In: SKOPE Issues Paper. Cardiff: Cardiff University, SKOPE.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (2011) “Future Directions for Skills Policy”, In: SKOPE submission to the Labour Party Policy Review on skills (mimeo). Universities of Oxford and Cardiff, SKOPE.
  • Mayhew, K, Green, F, Stasz, C (2005) Defining a strategy for the direct assessment of adult skills. Copenhagen:Danish Technological Institute.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (2004) Can Employers Be Persuaded That Training Pays? Glasgow: Future Skills Scotland/ScottishEnterprise.
  • Mayhew, K, Wilson, R, Hogarth, T, Keep, E (2003) Tackling the low skills equilibrium. London: Department of Trade and Industry.
  • Mayhew, K, Green, F, Molloy, E (2003) Employer Perspectives on Skill. London: Department for Education and Skills.
  • Mayhew, K, Keep, E, Bosworth, D (2003) Tackling the low skills equilibrium: a review of the issues. Department of Trade and Industry.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K, Corney, M (2002) Review of the evidence on the rate of return to employers of investment in training and employer training measures. Department of Trade and Industry.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (2001) “Globalisation, Models of Competitive Advantage and Skills”, In: SKOPE Research Paper. Coventry: University of Warwick, SKOPE.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (2000) “The Leisure Sector”, In: National Skills Task Force Research Project Report. Sheffield: DfEE.
  • Mayhew, K, Felstead, A, Green, F (1997) Getting the measure of training. Leeds: Centre for Industrial Policy and Performance, Leeds University.
  • Mayhew, K, Holtham, G (1996) Tackling long term unemployment. London: Institute for Public Policy Research.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1994) “UK Training Policy – Assumptions and Reality”, In: Background briefing paper for TUC national conference ‘Looking Forward to Full Employment’. London: TUC.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1994) Scoping paper for the Institute of Personnel Management ‘What Makes Training Pay?’ Project. London: IPM.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1993) Submission on training and skills utilisation to the House of Commons Select Committee on Trade and Industry’s inquiry into the competitiveness of British manufacturing’, June, 1993. (subsequently published in Evidence to the House of Commons Select Committee on Trade and Industry, Trade and Industry Committee 2nd Report ‘Competitiveness of UK Manufacturing Industry’, Vol 2, Memoranda of Evidence. London: HMSO.
  • Layard, R, Mayhew, K, Owen, G (1993) The Training Reform Act of 1994.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1108/01437729310033296
  • Mayhew, K, St John, B (1989) Subcontracting in Britain. London: Confederation of British Industry.
  • Mayhew, K, Rosewell, B (1981) Manpower problems and changes in the labour market. Bradford: MCB Publications.
  • Mayhew, K, Rosewell, B (1980) Employment and Unemployment Issues in the 1970s.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1108/eb001235
  • Mayhew, K, Lall, S (1973) The income and balance of payments effects of private foreign investment in manufacturing: case studies of Colombia and Malaysia. UNCTAD.
Other
  • “BREXIT and UK higher education”, Realites Industrielles, Feb 2021
  • Skills and Skills Mismatch in Food and Drink Manufacturing, a Report for DEFRA, 2020 (with Craig Holmes)
  • “Career choice and a policy dilemma”, CEDEFOP’S Skill Set and Match, November 2018
  • Oman: National Workforce Planning, SKOPE, 2016
  • Mayhew, K (2015) “Derek Robinson”, Royal Economic Society Newsletter.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1999) “Demand and supply”, People Management. 40-42.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1998) “Was Ratner Right”, T-Magazine. 15-17.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1998) “Welfare to Work – some questions ministers must answer”, Parliamentary Brief. 5(3) 18-19.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1996) “What Training Can and Cannot Do for the Jobless”, Parliamentary Brief. 4(4) 43-46.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1994) “Skilling the Jobless: Time for a New Deal”, Employment Policy Institute Economic Report. 8(1) 1-5.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1994) “Skills Cannot Promise a Job”, Parliamentary Brief .3(2) 17-20.

Herb completed a BA (Hons) Psychology at Indiana University in 1968. After that, he achieved an MA at Indiana before moving to UCLA to complete a DPhil in Psychology in 1974.

Shortly after, he was appointed Head of Evaluation Research Services at University of Southern California for 5 years, before moving to Sydney, Australia in 1980 to take a position as Lecturer, and then Senior Lecturer, at Sydney University.

At the same time, he was a Reader in Education. He held these posts until 1990, when he joined the University of Western Sydney. Over the next 15 years at that institution, he served a number of roles, including Research Professor of Education, Professor of Psychology, Dean of Graduate Research Studies, Pro-Vice Chancellor of Research, and Director of Self-concept Enhancement and Learning Facilitation (SELF) Research Centre. Indeed, in 1997 he founded the SELF Research Centre, which now has over 450 members, including many of the top self-concept researchers in the world, and satellite centres at leading Universities in Australia, Europe, North America, and Asia (see http://self.uws.edu.au/). He served as Director of SELF until he departed at the start of 2006 to become a Professor at the University of Oxford.

Herb has supervised scores of Honours-level and Doctoral candidates. Some of his recent PhD supervisions have been in the areas of self-concept theory and intervention, motivation, scale development, bullying, mental toughness in elite athletes, the peer review process, and eating disorders, among others. They generally employ complex quantitative research techniques

Research

Herb Marsh is widely published with 350 articles in more than 70 different journals, 60 chapters, 14 monographs, and 350 conference papers; and co-edits the International Advances in Self Research monograph series. In the most important journals in his disciplines over the last quarter century he is the most frequently published author in American Educational Research Journal (29 articles) and the Journal of Sport & Exercise Psych (21 articles), and second most frequently published author in Journal of Educational Psychology (61 articles). He has a total of 276 journal articles listed in ISI that have been cited a total of more than 11,00 times – including 55 articles with at least 55 citations (ISI H index = 55) and one article with more than 1,100 citations.

He has been recognized as the most productive educational psychologist in the world, as one of the top 10 international researchers in Higher Education and in Social Psychology, and the 11th most productive researcher in the world across all disciplines of psychology. He is a highly cited researcher on ISI’s list of the “world’s most cited and influential scientific authors over a sustained period according to a common standard that covers all countries and all scientific disciplines” (http://isihighlycited.com/), one of only a few UK social science researchers to achieve this recognition and one of the few anywhere to achieve this distinction in two different categories (general social sciences and psychology/psychiatry; presently there is no classification for education).

He has reviewed articles for more than 75 journals and has been on the editorial boards of 14 international journals (J. Ed Psych; Am Ed Res J; Child Devel; Perspectives on Psych Sci; J Pers & Soc Psych; Structural Equation Modelling; Inter J of Sport Psych; Ed & Psych Measurement; J Exp Educ; Educ Res and Eval; J Sport & Exercise Psych; Int J of Sport & Exercise Psych; J of Contemporary Ed Psych; Organizational Res Methods; Multivariate Behavioral Res).

He has served on external advisory committees for the: Scientific Advisory Board of the German Max Planck Institute (Education and Human Development, Berlin); Hong Kong Institute of Educational Research, Chinese University of Hong Kong; Social Sciences and Humanities for the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zürich (Zürich ETH); and the International Research School “The Life Course: Evolutionary and Ontogenetic Dynamics” co-organised by the Univ of Michigan (USA), Univ of Virginia (USA), Humboldt University (Germany), Free University (Germany) and the Max Planck Institute.

Professor Marsh’s research has consistently attracted external funding, including a 100% success record on 24 proposals to the highly competitive Australian Research Council during the last 25 years as well as more recent United Kingdom grants from the Economic and Social Research Council, Higher Education Funding Council for England, and Higher Education Authority.

Other international awards include a Career Achievement Award from the American Educational Research Association, the prestigious Wen Lin Visiting Professorship from The Chinese University of Hong Kong, a visiting travelling fellowship from the British Psychological Society, Fellow of the Australian Academy of Social Sciences and the Society of Multivariate Experimental Psychology, and many keynote presentations at international conferences including the presidential invited keynote addresses for 2007 meetings of both the British Educational Research Association and the American Educational Research Association. In 2008 Professor Marsh was awarded the ESRC Professorial Fellowship which provides professorial salary, support staff and infrastructure for an extended research programme, a highly competitive fellowship awarded to only 3-5 social science researchers across all of the UK.

Major research/scholarly interests

Self-concept and Motivational constructs: Theory, Measurement, Research, Enhancement; Teaching Effectiveness and Its Evaluation: Theory, measurement, research, and enhancement; Higher Education with a particular emphasis on students’ evaluation of teaching and relations between teaching and research; Developmental Psychology; Quantitative analysis, particularly confirmatory factor analysis, structural equation modelling, multilevel modelling; Sports psychology with a particular focus on physical self-concept and motivation; health psychology with a focus on motivational aspects of health related physical activity, physical fitness, and eating disorders; The peer review process in relation to both journals and research grants; Peer support and anti-bullying interventions.

Recent publications (2008 and in press)
Journal articles
  • Cowin, L.S. Johnson, M., Craven, R.G., & Marsh, H.W. (2008) Causal modeling of self-concept, job satisfaction, and retention of nurses International Journal Of Nursing Studies 45, 1449-1459
  • Craven, R. & Marsh, H. W. (2008). The centrality of the self-concept construct for psychological wellbeing and unlocking human potential: Implications for child and educational psychologists Educational & Child Psychology 25, 104-118.
  • Guay, F., Marsh, H. W., Senécal, C. , Dowson, M. (2008). Representations of relatedness with parents and friends and autonomous academic motivation during the late adolescence-early adulthood period: Reciprocal or unidirectional effects? British Journal of Educational Psychology, 78, 621–637
  • Ginns, P., Marsh, H. W., Behnia, M., Cheng, J. H. & Scalas, F. (in press). Using postgraduate students’ evaluations of research experience to benchmark departments and faculties: Issues and challenges British Journal of Educational Psychology
  • Fernet, C., Senécal, C., Guay, F., Marsh, H., & Dowson, M. (2008). The Work Tasks Motivation Scale for Teachers (WTMST) Journal of Career Assessment 16(2), 256-279.
  • Lüdtke, O., Marsh, H. W., Robitzsch, A., Trautwein, U., Asparouhov, T., & Muthén, B. (2008). The multilevel latent covariate model: A new, more reliable approach to group-level effects in contextual studies Psychological Methods 13, 203-229.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2008). The elusive importance effect: More failure for the Jamesian perspective on the importance of importance in shaping self-esteem Journal of Personality 76, 1081-1121.
  • Marsh, H. W., Jayasinghe, U. W., & Bond, N. W. (2008). Improving the peer-review process for grant applications: Reliability, validity and generalization American Psychologist 63, 160-168.
  • Marsh; H., Ludtke, O., Robitzsch, A., Trautwein, U. Latent (in press). Profile Analysis of Academic Self-concept Dimensions: Synergy of Person- and Variable-centered Approaches to the Internal/External Frame of Reference Models Structural Equation Modeling
  • Marsh, H. W., Martin, A. J., & Cheng, J. H. S. (2008). A multilevel perspective on gender in classroom motivation and climate: Potential benefits of male teachers for boys? Journal of Educational Psychology 100, 78-95.
  • Marsh, H. W., & O’Mara, A. (2008). Reciprocal effects between academic self-concept, self-esteem, achievement and attainment over seven adolescent years: Unidimensional and multidimensional perspectives of self-concept  Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin 34, 542-552.
  • Marsh, H. W., O’Mara, A. J. & Malmberg, L. (2008). Meta-Analysis: A three-level multilevel meta-anlaysis.
  • Marsh, H. W., Seaton, M., Trautwein, U., Lüdtke, O., Hau, K. T., O’Mara, A. J., & Craven, R. G. (2008). The big-fish-little-pond-effect stands up to critical scrutiny: Implications for theory, methodology, and future research Educational Psychology Review 20, 319-350.
  • Marsh, H. W., Trautwein, U., Ludtke, O. & Köller, O. (2008). Social comparison and big-fish-little-pond effects on self-concept and other self-belief constructs: Role of generalized and specific others Journal of Educational Psychology 100, 510-524.
  • Martin, A. J., & Marsh, H. W. (2008). Academic buoyancy: Towards an understanding of students’ everyday academic resilience Journal of School Psychology 46, 53-83.
  • Martin, A.J., & Marsh, H.W. (in press). Academic resilience and academic buoyancy: an encompassing multidimensional and hierarchical framing of concepts, causes, correlates, and cognate constructs Oxford Review of Education.
  • Martin, A.J., & Marsh, H.W. (2008). Workplace and academic buoyancy: Psychometric assessment and construct validity amongst school personnel and students Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment 26, 168-184.
  • Martin, A.J., Marsh, H.W., Debus, R. L. & Malmberg L. E. (2008). Performance and mastery orientation of high school and university/college students – A Rasch perspective Educational And Psychological Measurement 68, 464-487.
  • Scalas, L. F. & Marsh, H. W. (in press). The Role of Actual-Ideal Discrepancy in Explaining the Relation Between Physical Appearance and Self-Concept: A Stronger Methodological Approach European Journal of Personality.
  • Seaton, M., Marsh; H., & Craven, R. G. (in press). Earning Its Place as a Pan-Human Theory: Universality of the Big-Fish-Little-Pond Effect (BFLPE) Across 41 Culturally and Economically Diverse Countries Journal of Educational Psycholoygy.
  • Seaton, M., Marsh; H. W., Dumas; F., Huguet, P., Monteil, J. M, Regner, I., Blanton, H., Buunk, A. P., Gibbons, F. X. Kuyper, H., Suls, J. & Wheeler, L. (2008). In search of the big fish: Investigating the coexistance of the big-fish-little-pond effect with the positive effects of upward comparison British Journal of Social Psychology 47, 73-103.
  • Wen, Z., Marsh, H.W.,  Kit-Tai, H. & (in press). Structural Equation Models of Latent Interactions: An Appropriate Standardized Solution and Its Scale-free Properties Structural Equation Modeling
Edited books and chapters
  • Marsh, H. W., Craven, R. G., & McInerney, D. (Eds.). (2008). Self-Processes, Learning, and Enabling Human Potential: Dynamic New Approaches. International Advances in Self Research. Volume 3. Information Age Press: Greenwich, CT.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2007). Application of confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling in sport and exercise psychology. In G. Tenenbaum & R. C. Eklund. (Eds), Handbook of sport psychology (3rd Ed.). (pp. 774-798). Hoboken, NJ, US: John Wiley & Sons Inc.
  • Marsh, H. W. (In press). A multidimensional, hierarchical model of self-concept: An important facet of personality. In G. J. Boyle (ed.). Handbook of Personality. Sage: London.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2007). Physical Self-Concept and Sport. In S. Jowette & D. Lavallee, David (Eds), Social Psychology in Sport. (pp. 159-179). Champaign, IL, US: Human Kinetics.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2007). Students’ evaluations of university teaching: A multidimensional perspective. In R. P. Perry & J C. Smart (Eds.), The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: An Evidence-Based Perspective (pp.319-384).  New York: Springer.
  • Marsh, H.W., Cheng, J.,  Middleton, C. J. (in press). The Physical Self: Exploring Measurement and Constructs Surrounding Physical Self-Concept
  • Marsh, H.W., Martin, A. J. & Cheng, J. (2008). How we judge ourselves from different perspectives: Contextual influences on self-concept formation. In M. L. Maehr, S. Karabenick & T. Urdan (Eds.). Advances in Motivation and Achievement (Volume 15). New York: Elsevier.
  • Marsh, H.W., & O’Mara, A. J. (2008). Self-concept is as multidisciplinary as it is multidimensional: A review of theory, measurement, and practice in self-concept research. In H. W. Marsh, R. G. Craven, & D. M. McInerney (Eds.). Self-Processes, Learning, and Enabling Human Potential: Dynamic New Approaches. (Volume 3, pp. 87-118). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing
  • Marsh, H.W., & Retali, K. (in press). Academic self-concept. K. Littleton, C. Wood, J. K. Staarman (Eds.). Elsevier Handbook of Educational Psychology: New Perspectives on Learning and Teaching. New York: Elsevier
  • Marsh, H.W., Scalas L.F. (in press). Self-concept and learning: Reciprocal effects model between academic self-concept and academic achievement. To appear in B. McGaw, E. Baker, P. P. Peterson (Eds.) International Encyclopedia of Education, 3rd edition. Elsevier.
  • McInerney, D. M., Marsh, H.W., & Craven, R. G., & (2008). Self-Processes, Learning, and Enabling Human Potential. In H. W. Marsh, R. G. Craven, & D. M. McInerney (Eds.). Self-Processes, Learning, and Enabling Human Potential: Dynamic New Approaches. (Volume 3, pp. 3-12). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.
  • Parada, R., Craven, R. G., & Marsh, H.W. (2008). The beyond bullying secondary program: An innovative program empowering teachers to counteract bullying in schools. Self-Processes, Learning, and Enabling Human Potential: Dynamic New Approaches. (Volume 3, pp. 373-426). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.
  • Seaton, M., Craven, R. G., &  Marsh, H.W. (2008). East Meets West: Investigating the Generalizability of the Big-Fish-Little-Pond Effect in Western and Non-Western Countries. In H. W. Marsh, R. G. Craven, & D. M. McInerney (Eds.). Self-Processes, Learning, and Enabling Human Potential: Dynamic New Approaches. (Volume 3, pp. 353-372). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.
Most important publications (prior to 2008)
  • Marsh, H. W. (2007). Students’ evaluations of university teaching: A multidimensional perspective. In R. P. Perry & J C. Smart (Ed.), The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: An Evidence-Based Perspective (pp.319-384).  New York: Springer.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2007).Self-concept theory, measurement and research into practice: The role of self-concept in educational psychology. Leicester, UK: British Psychological Society.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2007). Application of confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling in sport/exercise psychology. In G. Tenenbaum & R. C. Eklund (Eds.), Handbook of on sport psychology (3rd ed., pp. 774 – 798). New York: Wiley.
  • Marsh, H. W., & Hau, K-T. (2007). Applications of latent-variable models in educational psychology: The need for methodological-substantive synergies. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 32, 151-171.
  • Marsh, H. W., Hau, K-T., Artelt, C., Baumert, J., Peschar, J. L. (2006). OECD’s brief self-report measure of educational psychology’s most useful affective constructs: Cross-cultural, psychometric comparisons across 25 countries. International Journal of Testing. 6, 311–360.  (special issue of journal).
  • Marsh, H. W. & Craven, R. G. (2006). Reciprocal effects of self-concept and performance from a multidimensional perspective: Beyond seductive pleasure and unidimensional perspectives. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 1, 133-163.
  • Marsh, H. W., Martin, A. J., & Hau, K-T. (2006). A Multiple Method Perspective on Self-concept Research in Educational Psychology: A Construct Validity Approach. In M. Eid & E. Diener (Eds.), Handbook of Multimethod Measurement in Psychology (pp. 441-456). American Psychological Association: Washington DC.
  • Marsh, H.W., Papaioannou, A., Theodorakis, Y. (2006). Causal ordering of physical self-concept and exercise behavior: Reciprocal effects model and the influence of physical education teachers. Health Psychology, 25 (3): 316-328
  • Marsh, H. W., Trautwein, U., Lüdtke, O., Köller, O. & Baumert, J. (2006) Integration of multidimensional self-concept and core personality constructs: Construct validation and relations to well-being and achievement. Journal of Personality, 74, 403-455.
  • Marsh, H. W., Ellis, L., Parada, L., Richards, G. & Heubeck, B. G. (2005). A short version of the Self Description Questionnaire II: Operationalizing criteria for short-form evaluation with new applications of confirmatory factor analyses. Psychological Assessment, 17, 81-102.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2005). Big fish little pond effect on academic self-concept. German Journal of Educational Psychology, 19, 119-128.
  • Marsh, H. W. & Kleitman, S. (2005). Consequences of employment during high school: Character building, subversion of academic goals, or a threshold. American Educational Research Journal, 42, 331-369.
  • Marsh, H. W., Debus, R. & Bornholt, L. (2005). Validating Young Children’s Self-concept Responses: Methodological Ways and means to understand their responses. In D. M. Teti (Ed.), Handbook of Research Methods in Developmental Science (pp. 138-160). Blackwell Publishers: Oxford, UK.
  • Marsh, H. W., Hau, K-T & Grayson, D. (2005). Goodness of Fit Evaluation in Structural Equation Modeling. In A. Maydeu-Olivares & J. McArdle (Eds.), Contemporary Psychometrics. A Festschrift for Roderick P. McDonald (pp. 275-340). Mahwah NJ: Erlbaum.
  • Marsh, H. W., & Perry, C. (2005). Does a positive self-concept contribute to winning gold medals in elite swimming? The causal ordering of elite athlete self-concept and championship performances. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 27, 71-91.
  • Marsh, H. W., Trautwein, U., Lüdtke, O., Köller, O. & Baumert, J. (2005) Academic self-concept, interest, grades and standardized test scores: Reciprocal effects models of causal ordering. Child Development, 76, 297-416.
  • Marsh, H. W. & Hau, K. T. (2004). Explaining paradoxical relations between academic self-concepts and achievements: Cross-cultural generalizability of the internal-external frame of reference predictions across 26 countries. Journal of Educational Psychology, 96,  56-67
  • Marsh, H.W., Hau, K.T. & Wen, Z., (2004).  In search of golden rules: Comment on hypothesis testing approaches to setting cutoff values for fit indexes and dangers in overgeneralising Hu & Bentler’s (1999) findings. Structural Equation Modelling, 11, 320-341.
  • Marsh, H. W.; Wen, Z.; Hau, K. (2004). Structural equation models of latent interactions: Evaluation of alternative estimation strategies and indicator construction. Psychological Methods, 9, 275-300.
  • Marsh, H. W. & Hau, K. T. (2003). Big fish little pond effect on academic self-concept: A crosscultural (26 country) test of the negative effects of academically selective schools. American Psychologist, 58, 364-376.
  • Guay, F., Marsh, H. W. & Boivin, M. (2003). Academic self-concept and academic achievement: Development perspectives on their causal ordering. Journal of Educational Psychology, 95, 124-136.
  • Marsh, H. W., Hau, K-T, & Kong, C-K, (2002). Multilevel Modeling of Longitudinal Growth and Change: Substantive Effects or Regression Toward the Mean Artifacts? Multivariate Behavioral Research, 37, 245-282.
  • Jayasinghe, U. W., Marsh, H. W. & Bond, N. (2002). A Multilevel Cross-classified Modelling Approach to Peer Review of Grant Proposals: The Effects of Assessor and Researcher Attributes on Assessor Ratings. Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A-Statistics in Society, 166, 279-300.
  • Marsh, H. W., Ellis, L., & Craven, R. G. (2002). How do preschool children feel about themselves? Unravelling measurement and multidimensional self-concept structure. Developmental Psychology, 38, 376-393.
  • Marsh, H. W. & Hattie, J. (2002). The relationship between research productivity and teaching effectiveness: Complimentary, antagonistic or independent constructs. Journal of Higher Education, 73, 603-642.
  • Marsh, H. W. & Kleitman, S. (2002). Extracurricular school activities: The good, the bad, and the nonlinear. Harvard Educational Review, 72, 464-502.
  • Marsh, H. W., Rowe, K., Martin, A. (2002). PhD students’ evaluations of research supervision: Issues, complexities and challenges in a nationwide Australian experiment in benchmarking universities. Journal of Higher Education, 73 (3), 313-348.
  • Marsh, H. W., Koeller, O., & Baumert, J. (2001). Reunification of East and West German school systems: Longitudinal multilevel modeling study of the big fish little pond effect on academic self-concept. American Educational Research Journal, 38 (2), 321-350.
  • Marsh, H. W., Parada, R. H., Yeung, A. S. & Healey, J. (2001). Aggressive School Troublemakers and Victims:A Longitudinal Model Examining the Pivotal Role of Self-concept. Journal of Educational Psychology, 93(2), 411-419.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2001). Distinguishing between good (useful) and bad workload on students’ evaluations of teaching. American Educational Research Journal, 38 (1), 183-212.
  • Marsh, H. W., Hau, K-T, & Kong, C-K, (2000). Late Immersion and Language of Instruction (English vs. Chinese) in Hong Kong High Schools: Achievement Growth in Language and Nonlanguage Subjects. Harvard Educational Review 70, 302-346.
  • Marsh, H. W., Kong, C-K, Hau, K-T (2000).  Longitudinal Multilevel Modeling of the Big Fish Little Pond Effect on Academic Self-concept:  Counterbalancing Social Comparison and Reflected Glory Effects in Hong Kong High Schools. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 78,  337-349.
  • Marsh, H. W., & Roche, L. A. (2000). Effects of grading leniency and low workloads on students’ evaluations of teaching: Popular myth, bias, validity or innocent bystanders? Journal of Educational Psychology, 92,:202-228.
  • Marsh, H. W., Craven, R. G., & Debus, R. (1998). Structure, stability, and development of young children’s self-concepts: A multicohort-multioccasion study. Child Development, 69(4), 1030-1053.
  • Marsh, H. W., Hau, K-T., Balla, J R., & Grayson, D. (1998) Is more ever too much? The number of indicators per factor in confirmatory factor analysis. Multivariate Behavioral Research, 33, 181-220.
  • Marsh, H. W., & Roche, L. A (1997). Making students’ evaluations of teaching effectiveness effective. American Psychologist, 52, 1187-1197.
  • Marsh, H. W. (1997). The measurement of physical self-concept: A construct validation approach. In K. Fox (Ed.), The physical self-: From motivation to well-being (pp. 27-58). Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.
  • Marsh, H. W.,  & Craven, R. (1997). Academic self-concept: Beyond the dustbowl. In G. Phye (Ed.), Handbook of classroom assessment: Learning, achievement, and adjustment (pp. 131-198). Orlando, FL : Academic Press.

Ingrid Lunt is a psychologist by background, and joined the Oxford Department of Education in 2005, having previously worked for 20 years at the Institute of Education, University of London.

She was Director of Graduate Studies for 5 years, and the first Director of the new ESRC Doctoral Training Centre (DTC) in the Social Sciences.

She has been President of the British Psychological Society (1998-1999), President of the European Federation of Psychologists Associations (1993-1999), and Vice President of the International Union of Psychological Science (2004-2008).

She has carried out research in the field of special educational needs and inclusive education, and more recently in the area of higher education, in particular higher professional education, and doctoral education. For the past 20 years she has been leading a project, initially funded by the European Union, which has been developing a common qualifications framework for psychologists across Europe.

Research

Ingrid’s research interests include higher professional learning, doctoral education, comparative higher education policy in European countries.

Publications

Selected publications include:

  • Scott D., Brown A., Lunt I., Thorne L. (2004) Professional Doctorates: Integrating professional and academic knowledge. Open University Press and SRHE
  • Klenowski V. and Lunt I. (2008) Enhancing Learning at Doctoral Level through the use of reflection? Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education 33, 2, 203-217.
  • Lunt I. (2008) Psychologist qualifications in Europe: Common standards for quality and mobility. Australian Psychologist 43, 4, 222-230
  • Lunt I. (2008) Beyond tuition fees? The legacy of Blair’s government to higher education. Oxford Review of Education 34, 6, 741-752
  • Edwards A., Lunt I., Stamou E. (2010) Inter-professional work and expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools. British Educational Research Journal 36, 1, 27-45
  • Lunt I. (2011) EuroPsy: the development of standards and competence of psychologists. European Psychologist 16, 2, 104-111
  • Lunt I. and Peiro J. M. (2012) The Bologna Process, education and assessment in psychology. In Ed. D. Dunn, S.C Baker, C.M Mehrota, R.E. Landrum, M.M McCarthy Assessing teaching and learning in psychology: current and future perspectives. Wadsworth Publishing, Belmont CA.
  • Lunt I., McAlpine L., Mills D. (2014) Lively bureaucracy: the ESRC’s Doctoral Training Centres and UK universities. Oxford Review of Education 40, 2, 151-170
  • Lunt I. (2014) International frameworks for psychology education and training: a European perspective. In R. Silbereisen, P. Ritchie, J. Panday (eds.) Psychology Education and Training : a global perspective. Hove: Psychology Press
  • Clarke, G. and Lunt, I. (2014) The concept of ‘originality’ in the PhD: how is it interpreted by examiners? Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, 39 (7), 803-820.
  • Lunt I., Peiró J.M., Poortinga Y.H., Roe R.A. (2015) EuroPsy: Standards and Quality in Education for Professional Psychologists. Göttingen: Hogrefe Pub.

Anne joined the Department in 2005 having held Chairs at the Universities of Leeds and Birmingham. She was Director of the Department for three years (January 2010 to December 2012) and when not in that post, she was its Director of Research. She became Professor Emerita in October 2014.

Anne is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, and of the Learned Society of Wales and is a former President of the British Educational Research Association. She is a Fellow of St Hilda’s College and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Oslo from 2007 to 2016 and has been awarded Doctorates honoris causa by the Universities of Helsinki and Oslo and in 2022 she received a lifetime’s achievement award from the American Educational Research Association’s Cultural-Historical SIG.

She was a member of the ESRC’s Research Grants Board between 2003 and 2007 and a member of the Education sub-panel in the 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise. She is co-founder of OSAT (the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research), is a founding editor of Learning Culture and Social Interaction. She is a member of the UK Cabinet Office’s Research Evidence Impact Panel (REIP), sits on several research advisory boards internationally, undertakes research evaluations for research councils worldwide and continues to be involved in institutional reviews.

Research

Anne’s research draws on cultural-historical approaches to learning. She focuses on professional learning and, in particular, the relational turn in expertise with the concepts of relational expertise, common knowledge and relational agency. These ideas are discussed in her 2010 book with Springer. In her later edited book Working relationally in and across practices (Cambridge University Press, 2017) researchers, who work with her ideas, have tested and refined these concepts in a range of different settings. Her research on practice, relational expertise and inter-professional work with vulnerable children and families also informs her interest in user engagement with research and its implications for the design of educational research. User engagement was discussed in her 2011 book with Mark Rickinson and Judy Sebba, in an exploration of knowledge exchange in the social sciences based in Oxford, and in study of school-university research relationships through the work of school-based research champions.

Her current research, informed by cultural-historical theory, is based at the University of Oslo. The research team has recently completed a Norwegian Research Council study of how elementary school teachers work successfully with shy and withdrawn children. The team has been awarded a further four years’ funding to examine shy children’s experiences of transitions between lessons in high school. She is currently co-authoring a book with Mariane Hedegaard for Cambridge University Press, where the two authors revisit their own research studies to make a case for a relational pedagogy, based in Vygotskian approaches to emotion, development and learning. She is also co-editing, with Helen Bound and Karen Evans and Arthur Chia, a collection for Taylor and Francis on current approaches to workplace learning. Her contribution, with Dorothy Sutherland Olsen, draws on a study of the transitions that arise through the introduction of new technologies into existing workplaces.

Publications since 2009

Books

  • Edwards, A., Daniels, H., Gallagher, T., Leadbetter, J. & Warmington, P. (2009) Improving Inter-professional Collaborations: multi-agency working for children’s wellbeing. London: Routledge.
  • Daniels, H., Edwards, A., Engeström, Y. & Ludvigsen, S. (Eds.) (2009) Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge.
  • Ellis, V., Edwards, A. & Smagorinsky, P.  (Eds.) (2009) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Being an Expert Professional Practitioner: the relational turn in expertise. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Rickinson, M., Sebba, J. & Edwards, A. (2011) Improving User-engagement in Educational Research. London: Routledge.
  • Hedegaard, M., Edwards, A. & Fleer, M. (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wells, G. & Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2013) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Edwards, A. (Ed.) (2017) Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Hedegaard, M.& Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2019) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (Eds.) (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer.
  • Bound, H., Edwards, A. & Evans, K. (Eds.) (forthcoming) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor and Francis.
  • Hedegaard, M. & Edwards, A. (forthcoming) Taking Children Seriously: a relational approach to Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chapters in Books

  • Edwards, A.  (2009) Becoming a Teacher, in H. Daniels, J. Porter & H. Lauder (Eds.) Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning: vol 1. London: Routledge, pp. 153-164.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Agency and Activity Theory: from the systemic to the relational, in A Sannino, H Daniels & K. Guttierez (Eds.) Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 197-211.
  • Edwards, A. & Kinti I. (2009) Working Relationally at Organisational Boundaries: negotiating expertise and identity, in H. Daniels, A. Edwards, Y. Engeström & S. Ludvigsen (Eds.)  Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge, pp. 126-139.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) How can CHAT help us to understand and develop teacher education?, in V. Ellis, A. Edwards & P. Smagorinsky (Eds.) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge, pp. 63-77.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Learning How to Know Who: professional learning for expansive practice between organisations, in S Ludvigsen, A. Lund, I. Rasmussen & R. Saljo (Eds.) Learning Across Sites. London: Routledge, pp. 17-32.
  • Edwards, A.  (2010) Qualitative Designs and Analysis, in G. MacNaughton, S. Rolfe & I. Siraj-Blatchford (Eds.) Doing Early Childhood Research: Theory and Process: an international perspective 2nd Edition. Melbourne: Allen and Unwin, pp.155-175.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) Expertise in the Children’s Workforce: knowledge and motivation in engagement with children, in M. Hedegaard, A. Edwards & M. Fleer (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 173-190.
  • Edwards, A. & Ellis, V.  (2012) The Professional Development of Teachers: European perspectives, in C. Day (Ed.) International Handbook on Teacher and School Development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) User Engagement and the Processes of Educational Research, in L. Farrell & T. Fenwick (Eds.) Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities. London:  Routledge
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Integrating Children’s Services, in G. Head (Ed.) Professionals, Children and the Community: working together, London: Pearson.
  • Edwards, A. & Thompson, M. (2013) Resourceful Leadership: revealing the creativity of organizational leaders, in A. Sannino & V. Ellis (Eds.) Learning and Collective Creativity: Activity-Theoretical and Sociocultural Studies. London: Routledge.  pp. 49-64.
  • Childs, A., Edwards, A. & McNicholl, J. (2013) Developing a Multi-layered System of Distributed Expertise: What does cultural historical theory bring to understandings of workplace learning in school university partnerships?, in O. McNamara et al. (Eds.) Teacher Learning in the Workplace: widening perspectives on practice and policy. Dordecht: Springer. pp. 29-45.
  • Lundsteen, N. & Edwards, A. (2013) Internship: navigating the practices of an investment bank, in G. Wells &   Edwards (Eds.) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.pp.155-168.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Learning from Experience in teaching; a cultural historical critique, in V. Ellis & J. Orchard (Eds.) Learning Teaching from Experience: Multiple Perspectives, International Contexts. London: Bloomsbury.pp.47-61.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Designing Tasks which Engage Learners with Knowledge, in I. Thompson (Ed.) Task Design,Subject Pedagogy and Student Engagement. London: Routledge. pp. 13-27.
  • Edwards, A. (2016) A Cultural-historical Approach to Practice: working within and across practices, in J. Lynch et al. (Eds.) Practice Theory: Diffractive readings in professional practice and education. London: Routledge.127-140.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural-historical Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: teaching to support student agency, in B. Leibowitz, V. Bozalek & P. Kahn (Eds.) Theorising Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Taylor and Francis. pp.124-138.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Introductory chapter, final chapter and a joint chapter on knowledge exchange in the social sciences with E. Stamou, in A. Edwards (Ed.), Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural Historical Theory and Pedagogy: the influence of Vygotsky on the field, in R. MacLean (Ed.) Handbook on Life in Schools and Classrooms: Past, present and future visions. Dordrecht, Springer. pp. 153-166.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Relational Expertise: a cultural-historical approach to teacher education, in Peters, B. Cowie & I Menter (Eds.) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 555-567.
  • Edwards, A. & Montecinos, C. (2017) Working Relationally on Complex Problems: building the capacity for joint agency in new forms of work, in M. Goller & S. Paloniemi (Eds.) Agency at Work. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 229-247.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) The Dialectic of Person and Practice: how cultural-historical accounts of agency can inform teacher education, in J. Clandinin & J. Husu (Eds.) The Sage Handbook on Research on Teacher Education, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. pp.269-285.
  • Edwards, A. & Hedegaard, M. (2019) Rethinking Professional Support for Challenging Transitions: enabling the agency of children, young people and their families, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 1-18.
  • Edwards, A. & Evangelou, M. (2019) Easing Transitions into School for Children from Socially Excluded ‘Hard to Reach’ Families: from risk and resilience to agency and demand, in M.Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 115-130.
  • Edwards, A. & Fay, Y. (2019) Supporting the Transitions to Work of Autistic Young People: building and using common knowledge, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp 262-278.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp. 1-20.
  • Edwards, A., Chan, J. & Tan, D. (2019) Motive Orientation and the Exercise of Agency: responding to recurrent demands in practices, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp.201-214.
  • Edwards, A. (in press) Learning for a High Skills Economy: what a cultural-historical approach can offer, in H. Bound, A. Chia, J. Tan & R. Lim Wei Ying (Eds.) Flipping the Lens from Teaching to Learning. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Edwards, A. & Sutherland Olsen, D. (forthcoming) Cultural-historical Understandings of Transitions in Changing Workplaces, in H. Bound, A. Edwards, K. Evans, A. Chia (Eds.) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor & Francis.
  • Edwards, A. (forthcoming) A Relational View of a Future-oriented Pedagogy: sustaining the agency of learners and teachers, in N. Hopwood & A. Sannino (Eds.) Agency and Transformation: Motives, mediation and motion. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Refereed Articles

  • Edwards, A. (2009) Understanding Boundaries in Inter-professional Work, The Scottish Educational Review, 41, 1, 5-21.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Relational Agency in Collaborations for the Wellbeing of Children and Young People, Journal of Children’s Services, 4, 1, 33-43.
  • Shaw, I., Morris, K &. Edwards, A. (2009) Technology, Social Services and Organizational Innovation or How Great Expectations in London and Cardiff are Dashed in Lowestoft and Cymtyrch, Journal of Social Work Practice,  23, 4, 383 – 400.
  • Edwards, A., Lunt, I. & Stamou, E. (2010) Inter-professional Work and Expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools, British Educational Research Journal, 36, 1, 27-45.
  • Edwards, A. (2011) Building Common Knowledge at Boundaries between Professional Practices, International Journal of Educational Research 50, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A & Daniels, H. (2012) The knowledge that matters in professional practices Journal of Education and Work 25, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) The role of common knowledge in achieving collaboration across practices Learning Culture and Social Interaction 1, 1, 22-32.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) A Tool for Public Services Research and Development, International Journal of Public Management. 11,1, 21-33.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Discussant’s Comments: Recognising and Realising Teachers’ Professional Agency, Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice. 21, 6, 779-784.
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. & Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: the development of the Oxford Education Deanery narrative, Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373. http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/edui.v6.27724
  • Hopwood, N., Day, C. & Edwards, A. (2016) Partnership Practice as Collaborative Knowledge Work: overcoming common dilemmas through an augmented view of professional expertise, Journal of Children’s Services. 11, 2, 111-123.
  • Engeness, I. & Edwards, A. (2016) The Complexity of Learning: Exploring the Interplay of Different Mediational Means in Group Learning with Digital Tools, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 61, 1, 650-667. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2016.1173093
  • Hopwood, N. & Edwards, A. (2017) How common knowledge is constructed and why it matters in collaboration between professionals and clients, International Journal of Educational Research, 83, 107–119.
  • Edwards, A. (2020) Agency, Common Knowledge and Motive Orientation: working with insights from Hedegaard in research on provision for vulnerable children and young people, Learning Culture and Social Interaction. 26, 100224. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.lcsi.2018.04.004
  • Mjelve, L.H., Nyborg, G., Edwards, A.& Crozier, R. (2019) Teachers’ Understandings of Shyness: psychosocial differentiation for student inclusion, British Educational Research Journal. 45(6), 1295- doi:10.1002/berj.3563
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, H., Edwards, A. & Crozier, R. (2020 ) Teachers’ Strategies for Enhancing Shy Children’s Engagement in Oral Activities: necessary but insufficient? International Journal of Inclusive Education. 1-16. doi:10.1080/13603116.2020.1711538
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A. & Nyborg, G. (2020) Leading for School Inclusion: how school leadership teams support shy students, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 1-14. doi:10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Solberg, S., Edward, A., Mjelve, L.H., & Nyborg, G. (in press). Working relationally with networks of support within schools: Supporting teachers in their work with shy students. Journal of Education for Children Placed at Risk (JESPAR), 1-23. doi.org/10.1080/10824669.2020.1854760
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A., & Nyborg, G. (2020). Leading for school inclusion and prevention? How school leadership teams support shy students and their teachers. Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, 1-14. doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Burn, K. Conway, R., Edwards, A. & Harries, E. (2021) The Role of School-based Research Champions in a School-University Partnership. British Educational Research Journal, 47(3). 616-633. doi.org/10.1002/berj.3675
  • Rickinson, M. & Edwards, A. (2021) The Relational Features of Evidence Use, Cambridge Journal of Education, 51(4), 509-526.  doi.org/10.1080/0305764X.2020.1865877
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, L.H., Edwards, A., Crozier, R. & Coplan, R. (2022) Working relationally with shy students: pedagogical insights from teachers and students. Learning, Culture and Social Interaction. authors.elsevier.com/sd/article/S2210-6561(22)00011-3

Reports

  • Edwards, A. & Stamou, E. (2009) The Development of Preventative Practices in England: implications for the children’s workforce. DCSF: Children’s Workforce Development Council
  • Hannan, S., Canwell, A. Longfils, H. & Edwards, A. (2011) The Resourceful Leader, Nottingham: National College
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Leading the Learning: how the intelligent leader builds capacity. Nottingham: National College.
  • Edwards, A. & Downes, P. (2013) Alliances for Inclusion: cross-sector policy synergies and inter-professional collaboration in and around schools. NESET for the European Commission.
  • Alexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. & Menter, I. (2014) Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools. Oxford University: CitiFoundation.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Inter-professional Working in and around Schools, in C. McLaughlin (Ed.) The Connected School: a design for wellbeing. London: Pearson / NCB.

Geoffrey Walford is Emeritus Professor of Education Policy and an Emeritus Fellow of Green Templeton College at the University of Oxford.

He was previously Reader in Education Policy at Oxford, and Senior Lecturer in Sociology and Education Policy at Aston Business School, Aston University, Birmingham.

He has academic degrees from Oxford, Kent, London and the Open Universities, has authored or edited more than 40 books, and published rather too many academic articles and book chapters. He was Joint Editor of the British Journal of Educational Studies from 1999 to 2002, and was Editor of the Oxford Review of Education from 2004 to 2010. He remains as a Deputy Editor of Ethnography and Education and serves on several editorial boards.

Professor Walford’s main research foci are the relationships between central government policy and local processes of implementation, private schools, choice of schools, religiously-based schools, and ethnographic research methodology. He remains engaged with various scholarly writing activities working, in particular, on issues connected to private schooling for the poor and social justice. He was awarded a DLitt from Oxford University in 2016.

Publications

Major articles and book chapters

  • Geoffrey Walford (2023) ‘Low-fee private schools.’  In Bob Tierney, Fazal Rizvi and Kadriye Wrcikan (editors-in-chief); Fazal Rizvi and Jason Beech (eds.) Section 1, Globalization and shifting geopolitics of education, International Encyclopedia of Education 4th edition, Vol 1 (Oxford: Elsevier) pp.355-365.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2022) ‘Country houses repurposed as private schools: what might be the motivations?’  Oxford Review of Education, 48, 1, pp. 14-27.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2021) ‘Country houses repurposed as private schools: building on inequality.’ Oxford Review of Education, 47, 3, pp. 369-385.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2021) ‘What is worthwhile auto-ethnography? Research in the age of the selfie.’ Ethnography and Education, 16, 1, pp. 31-43.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2020) ‘Interviews and interviewing in the ethnography of education.’ In George W. Noblit. (ed.) Oxford Encyclopedia of Qualitative Research Methods in Education (New York: Oxford University Press) (Reprint) pp. 672-685.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2020) ‘Ethnography is not qualitative.’ Ethnography and Education, 15, 1, pp. 122-136.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2019) ‘The provenance of Stowe. Percy Warrington: the founder schools wished to forget.’ History of Education Researcher, 104, pp. 100-108.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2018) ‘The impossibility of anonymity in ethnographic research.’ Qualitative Research, 18, 5, pp. 516-525.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2018) ‘Interviews and interviewing in the ethnography of education.’Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Education, Editor in Chief: George W. Noblit. On-line. DOI: 10.1093/acrefore/9780190264093.013.320, May, pp. 20.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2018) ‘Recognisable continuity. A defence of multiple methods.’ In Dennis Beach, Carl Bagley, and Sofia Maques da Silva (eds.) The Wiley Handbook of Ethnography of Education (London, Wiley) pp. 17-29.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2017) ‘Ruling-class classification and framing.’ In Agnés Van Zanten (ed.) Elites in Education, Volume 2, National Traditions and Cosmopolitism in Elite Education. (London, Routledge) (Reprint)
  • Geoffrey Walford (2016) ‘Ethnographic methodology: A Virtual Special Issue of Ethnography and Education. Introduction.’ Ethnography and Education.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2015) ‘The globalisation of low-fee private schools’ In Joseph Zajda (ed.) Second International Handbook on Globalisation, Education and Policy Research (Amsterdam, Springer) ISBN: 978-94-017-9492-3, pp. 309-20.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2014) ‘Site selection within comparative case study and ethnographic research.’ (Reprint) In Malcolm Tight (ed.) Case Studies (London, Sage)
  • Ian Macpherson, Susan Robertson and Geoffrey Walford (2014) ‘An introduction to privatisation, education and social justice.’ In Ian Macpherson, Susan Robertson and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) Education, Privatisation, and Social Justice: Case studies from Africa, South Asia, and South East Asia (Abingdon, Symposium) pp. 9-24.
  • Ingrid Lunt and Geoffrey Walford (2014) ‘Contributions to the sociology of education: Past, present and future. A Festschrift for John Furlong.’ Oxford Review of Education, 40, 4, pp. 411-414.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2014) ‘From City Technology Colleges to Free schools: Ideas of social justice.’ Research Papers in Education, 29, 3, pp. 315-329.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2014) ‘Introduction: Academies, Free Schools and social Justice.’ Research Papers in Education, 29, 3, pp. 263-267.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2013) ‘The development of private and public schools in England.’ In Aydin Gürlevik, Christian Palentien and Robert Heyer (eds.) Privatschulen versus staatliche Schulen (Wiesbaden, Germany: Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden) pp. 89-102.  ISBN: (pb) 978-3-531-18199-8; (e-book) 978-3-531-18978-9.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2013) ‘Low-fee private schools: a methodological and political debate.’ In Prachi Srivastava (ed.) Low-Fee Private Schooling: Aggravating equity or mitigating disadvantage? (Oxford: Symposium Books) pp. 199-213. ISBN: 978-1-873927-91-5.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2013) ‘State support for private schooling in India: What do the evaluations of the British Assisted Places Schemes suggest?’ Oxford Review of Education, 39, 4, pp. 533-547.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2013) ‘The development of private and public schools in England.’ In Aydin Gürlevik, Christian Palentien and Robert Heyer (eds.) Privatschulen versus staatliche Schulen (Wiesbaden, Germany: Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden) pp. 89-102.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2013) ‘Low-fee private schools: a methodological and political debate.’ In Prachi Srivastava (ed.) Low-Fee Private Schooling: Aggravating equity or mitigating disadvantage? (Oxford, Symposium Books) pp. 199-213.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2012) ‘Researching the powerful in education: a re-assessment of the problems.’ International Journal for Research and Method in Education, 35, 2, pp. 111-118
  • Geoffrey Walford (2011) ‘Globalization and low-fee private schools?’ Educational Practice and Theory, 33, 1, pp. 37-50.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2011) ‘The Oxford Ethnography Conference: A place in history?’ Ethnography and Education, 6, 2, pp. 133-145.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2011) ‘Low-fee private schools in England and in less economically developed countries. What can we learn from a comparison?’ Compare, 41, 3, pp. 401-413.
  • Eric Tucker, Madhu Viswanathan and Geoffrey Walford (2010) ‘Reflections on social measurement:  How social scientists generate, modify, and validate indicators and scales.’ In Geoffrey Walford, Eric Tucker and Madhu Viswanathan (eds.) The Sage Handbook of Measurement(London, Sage) pp. 1-5.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2010) ‘Faith-based schools in England after ten years of Tony Blair’, in Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Blair’s Educational Legacy? (London, Routledge) pp. 52-62.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2009) ‘For ethnography?’ Ethnography and Education, 4, 3, pp. 273-284.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2009) ‘Private schools in England.’ Zeitschrift für Pädagogik, 55, 5, pp. 716- 731.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2009) ‘The practice of writing ethnographic fieldnotes.’ Ethnography and Education, 4, 2, pp. 117-130.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2009) ‘Symposium review of: John Beck, Meritocracy, Citizenship and Education’ (with Anthony Giddens and Yoshiko Nozaki) British Journal of Sociology of Education, 30, 1, pp. 97-105.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘Finding the limits: autoethnography and being an Oxford University Proctor.’ In Paul Atkinson and Sara Delamont (eds.) Representing Ethnography (London, Sage) pp. 147-162.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘Selecting sites, and gaining ethical and practical access.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.)How to do Educational Ethnography (London, Tufnell Press) pp. 16-38.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘The nature of educational ethnography.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) How to do Educational Ethnography (London, Tufnell Press) pp. 1-15.
  • Martin Forsey, Scott Davies and Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘The globalisation of school choice: an introduction to key issues and concerns.’ In Martin Forsey, Scott Davies and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) The Globalisation of School Schoice? (Abingdon, Symposium Books) pp. 9-25.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘School choice in England: globalisation, policy borrowing or policy corruption? In Martin Forsey, Scott Davies and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) The Globalisation of School Schoice? (Abingdon, Symposium Books) pp. 95-109.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ’Faith-based schools in England after 10 years of Tony Blair.’ Oxford Review of Education, 34, 6, pp. 689-699.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘Muslim schools in England and the Netherlands: sustaining cultural continuity.’ In Zvi Bekerman and Ezra Kopelowitz (eds.) Cultural Education – Cultural Sustainability: Minority, diaspora, indigenous and ethno-religious groups in multicultural societies. (London, Routledge)
  • Geoffrey Walford (2007) ‘Finding the limits: autoethnography and being an Oxford University Proctor.’ In Alan Bryman (ed.) Qualitative Research 2, Volume 3 Issues of Representation and reflexivity (London, Sage) pp. 214-229.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2007) ‘Classification and framing of interviews in ethnographic interviewing. Ethnography and Education, 2, 2, pp. 145-157.
  • Geoffrey Walford and Prachi Srivastava (2007) ‘Examining Private Schooling in Less Economically Developed Countries: Key Issues and New Evidence.’ In Prachi Srivastava and Geoffrey Walford (2007) (eds.) Private Schooling in Less-Economically Developed Countries: Asian and African perspectives (Abingdon, Symposium Books)
  • Geoffrey Walford (2007) ‘Everyone generalizes, but ethnographers should resist doing so.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Methodological Developments in Ethnography (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 12) (Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, Elsevier)
  • Geoffrey Walford (2006) ‘New Christian schools in England: What are the equity mplications?’ International Journal of Learning, 13, 5, pp. 167-176.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2006) ‘From City Technology Colleges to sponsored grant-maintained schools.’ In David Phillips and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) Tracing Education Policy. Selections from the Oxford Review of Education(London, Routledge) pp. 359-375.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2006) ‘Introduction: education and the Labour Government.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Education and the Labour Government. An evaluation of two terms. (London, Routledge).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2005) ‘Learning and the local community: Is community involvement always a good thing?’ International Journal of Learning, 11, pp. 1219-1225.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2005) ‘Research ethical guidelines and anonymity.’ International Journal of Research and Method in Education, 28, 1, pp. 83-93.
  • Holger Daun, Reza Arjmand and Geoffrey Walford (2004) ‘Muslims and education in a global context.’ In Holger Daun and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) Educational Strategies among Muslims in the Context of Globalization. Some National Case Studies. (Leiden, Boston, Brill) pp. 5-36.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2004) ‘Private schooling in England’ (in Chinese) Journal of Non-Government Educational Development, 103, pp. 55-60.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2004) ‘When tradition meets modern law: changing the role of the Oxford University Proctors.’ Research in Education, 72, pp. 103-114.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2004) ‘No discrimination on the basis of irrelevant qualifications.’ Cambridge Journal of Education, 34, 3, pp. 353-361.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2004) ‘Finding the limits: autoethnography and being an Oxford University Proctor.’Qualitative Research, 4, 3, pp. 403-417.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘Country Report on school-based management in England.’ Precedings of the Third International Forum on Educational Reform Education Decentralization Revisited: School-Based Management(Bangkok, Office of the Education Council) pp. 1-23.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘Separate schools for religious minorities in England and the Netherlands: using a framework for the comparison and evaluation of policy.’Research Papers in Education , 18, 3, pp 1-19.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘School choice, educational change and inequality in England.’ In The Organising Committee (eds.) Proceedings of the 37th Annual Conference of the Japan Educational Administration Society(Tokyo, Dojidai Sha, Nichi-nichi Kyoiku Bunko)  pp. 19-49 (in Japanese) pp.147-172 (in English).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘Muslim schools in Britain.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) British Private Schools: research on policy and practice. (London, Woburn Press) pp. 158-174.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘Introduction.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) British Private Schools: research on policy and practice. (London, Woburn Press) pp. 1-8.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘School choice and educational change in England and Wales.’ In  David N. Plank and Gary Sykes (eds.) Choosing Choice: School Choice in International Perspective (New York & London, Teachers College Press) pp. 68-91.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘Education.’ In W. S. F. Pickering (ed.) Durkheim Today, New York, Oxford, Berghahn Books,  pp. 105-115.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘Introduction.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Doing a Doctorate in Educational Ethnography (Studies in  Educational Ethnography, Volume 7) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI, pp. 1-8.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘When policy moves fast, how long can ethnography take?’ In Bradley A. U. Levinson, Sandra L. Cade, Ana Padawer and Ana Patricia Elvir (eds.) Ethnography and Education Policy Across the Americas, Westport, CT, Praeger,  pp. 23-38.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘Why don’t we name our research sites?’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Educational Ethnography and Methodology, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 6) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI, pp. 95-105.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘Educational reform and sociology in England and Wales.’ In David L. Levinson, Peter W. Cookson, Jr., and Alan R. Sadovnik (eds.) Education and Sociology: An Encyclopaedia, New York and London, RoutledgeFalmer, pp. 211-219.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘Classification and framing of the curriculum in evangelical Christian and Muslim schools in England and the Netherlands.’ Educational Studies, 28, 4, pp. 403-419.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) ‘Redefining school effectiveness.’ Westminster Studies in Education, 25, 1, pp. 47-58.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘The state and civil society in education in England: past developments and current problems.’ In Heinz-Dieter Meyer and William Lowe Boyd (eds.) Education between State, Markets, and Civil Society: Comparative perspectives, Mahwah, NJ & London, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, pp. 81-100.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Privatization in industrialized countries.’ In Henry M. Levin (ed.) Privatizing Education. Can the marketplace deliver choice, efficiency, equity, and social cohesion? Boulder, CO  & Oxford, Westview Press, pp. 178-200.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘From common schooling to selection? Affirming and contesting the comprehensive ideal, 1976-2001.’ In Robert Phillips and John Furlong (eds.)  Education, Reform and the State: Politics, Policy and Practice 1976-2001 London & New York, RoutledgeFalmer, pp. 45-57.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Introduction: ethnography and policy.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Ethnography and Education Policy, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 4) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI, pp. 1-9.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Durkheim, democracy and diversity: some thoughts on recent changes in England and Wales.’ In W S F Pickering (ed.) Emile Durkheim: Critical Assessments of Leading Sociologists. Volume VI,London & New York, Routledge, pp. 543-559.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Introduction’ (to Education Section). In W S F Pickering (ed.) Emile Durkheim: Critical Assessments of Leading Sociologists. Volume VI, London & New York, Routledge, pp. 365-371.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Funding for religious schools in England and the Netherlands. Can the piper call the tune?’ Research Papers in Education, 16, 4, pp. 359-380.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Evangelical Christian schools in England and the Netherlands.’  Oxford Review of Education, 27, 4, pp. 529-541.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Building identity through communities of practice: Evangelical Christian schools in the Netherlands.’ International Journal of Education and Religion, 2, 2, pp. 126-143.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘The fate of the new Christian schools: from growth to decline?’ Educational Studies,27, 4, pp. 465-477.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Site selection within comparative case-study and ethnographic research.’ Compare, 31, 2, pp.151-164.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) ‘Does the market ensure quality?’ Westminster Studies in Education 24, 1, pp. 23-33.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘School choice and social exclusion in England and Wales.’ In John Sayer and Johan Vanderhoven (eds.) School Choice, Equity and Social Exclusion, Leuven, Garant.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘Introduction.’ In Geoffrey Walford and Caroline Hudson (eds.) Genders and Sexualities in Educational Ethnography, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 3) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI/Elsevier.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘First days in the field: gender and sexuality in an evangelical Christian school.’ In Geoffrey Walford and Caroline Hudson (eds.) Genders and Sexualities in Educational Ethnography, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 3) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI/Elsevier.
  • W S F Pickering and Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘Introduction.’ In W. S.F. Pickering and Geoffrey Walford (eds.)Durkheim’s Suicide: a century of research and debate, London & New York, Routledge, pp. 1-10.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘What’s new about academic capitalism’ Learning & Managing, 6, 2, pp. 174-181.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘Government policy on private schooling in England’ Education and Society, 18, 1, pp. 25-43.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘From City Technology Colleges to sponsored grant-maintained schools’ Oxford Review of Education, 26, 2, pp. 145-158.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) ‘A policy adventure: sponsored grant-maintained schools’ Educational Studies, 26, 2, pp. 247-262.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1999) ‘L’enseignement privé en Angleterre: tendances récentes et problèmes soulevés’Carrefours de l’éducation, 8, pp. 126-139.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1999) ‘Selling your way in: gaining access to research sites.’ In Alexander Massey and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) Explorations in Methodology, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 2)  Stamford, CT, JAI Press,  pp. 1-15.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1999) ‘Educating religious minorities within the English state-maintained sector’International Journal of Educational Management, 13, 2, pp. 98-106.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Durkheim, democracy and diversity: some thoughts on recent changes in England.’ In Geoffrey Walford and W. S. F. Pickering (eds.)  Durkheim and Modern Education, London & New York, Routledge, pp. 125-141.
  • W. S. F. Pickering and Geoffrey Walford (1988) ‘Introduction: Durkheim and education.’ In Geoffrey Walford and W. S. F. Pickering (eds.) Durkheim and Modern Education, London & New York, Routledge, pp. 1-16.
  • Alexander Massey and Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Children learning: Ethnographers learning.’ In Geoffrey Walford and Alexander Massey  (eds.) Children Learning in Context, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 1), Stamford, CT & London, JAI Press, pp. 1-18.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Essay review: Is there a ‘new variant’ diploma disease?’ Oxford Review of Education, 24, 3,  pp. 405-409.
  • David Rigoni and Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Questioning the quick-fix: Assertive Discipline and the 1997 Education White Paper’ Journal of Education Policy, 13, 3, pp. 443-452.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Compulsive writing behaviour: getting it published.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Doing Research About Education, London & Washington D.C., Falmer, pp. 184-198.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Research accounts count.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Doing Research About Education, London & Washington, D.C., Falmer, pp. 1-10.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1998) ‘Reading and writing the small print: The fate of sponsored grant-maintained schools.’  Educational Studies, 24, 2, pp. 241-257.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘School choice and the common good: a reply to Brighouse’ Oxford Review of Education, 23, 4, pp. 517-521.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997)  ‘The 14-19 curriculum in private schools.’ In Sally Tomlinson (ed.) Education 14-19: Critical Perspectives, London & Atlantic Highlands, NJ, Athlone, pp. 101-112.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘Diversity, choice and selection in England and Wales’ Educational Administration Quarterly 33, 2, pp. 158-169.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘Sponsored grant-maintained schools: extending the franchise?’ Oxford Review of Education, 23, 1, pp. 31-44.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘Education and private schools.’ In Anthony Giddens (ed.) Sociology: Introductory readings, Cambridge, Polity, pp. 329-336.
  • Steven Carroll and Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘The child’s voice in school choice’ Educational Management and Administration, 25, 2, pp. 169-180.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘Privatization and selection.’ In Richard Pring and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) Affirming the Comprehensive Ideal, London, Falmer.
  • Steven Carroll and Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘Parents’ responses  to the school quasi-market’ Research Papers in Education, 12, 1, pp. 3-26.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) ‘Power and responsibility in pressure group activity.’ In Keith Watson, Sohan Modgil and Celia Modgil (eds.)  Educational Dilemmas: Debate and diversity, London, Cassell,  pp. 247-253 and 264-265.
  • Steven Carroll and Geoffrey Walford (1996) ‘A panic about school choice’ Educational Studies, 22, 3, pp. 393-407.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1996)  ‘School choice and equity in England and Wales’  Oxford Studies in Comparative Education, 6, 1, pp. 49-62.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1996) ‘Diversity and choice in school education: an alternative view’ Oxford Review of Education,  22, 2, pp. 143-154.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1996)  ‘Faith-based grant-maintained schools: Selective international policy borrowing from The Netherlands’ in John Ahier, Ben Cosin and Margaret Hales (eds.) Diversity and Change: Education, policy and selection, London, Routledge, pp. 63-78.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995)  ‘The Northbourne amendments: Is the House of Lords a garbage can?’ Journal of Education Policy, 10 (5) pp. 413-425.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995) ‘Faith-based schools, diversity and inequity.’ In Gwen Wallace (ed.)  Schools, Markets and Management, Bournmouth, Hyde Publications, pp. 13-20.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995) ‘The Christian Schools Campaign – a successful educational pressure group?’ British Educational Research Journal, 21 (4) pp. 451-464.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995)  ‘Faith-based grant-maintained schools: Selective international policy borrowing from The Netherlands.’ Journal of Education Policy, 10 (2) pp. 245-257.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995) ‘Classification and framing in English public boarding schools.’  In Paul Atkinson, Brian Davies and Sara Delamont (eds.) Discourse and Reproduction. Essays in honor of Basil Bernstein, New Jersey, USA, Hampton Press, pp. 191-207.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994)  ‘A return to selection?’ Westminster Studies in Education, 17, pp. 19-30.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994) ‘Political commitment in the study of the City Technology College, Kingshurst.’  In David Halpin and Barry Troyna (eds.) Researching Education Policy: Ethical and Methodological Issues, London, Falmer, pp. 94-106.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994)  ‘The dilemma of choice in education.’ In Ian Lawrence (ed.) Education Tomorrow, London, Cassell, pp. 130-144.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994)  ‘Reflections on researching the powerful.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Researching the Powerful in Education, London, UCL Press, pp. 222-231.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994)  ‘Ethics and power in a study of pressure group politics.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.)Researching the Powerful in Education, London, UCL Press, pp. 81-93.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994) ‘A new focus on the powerful.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Researching the Powerful in Education, London, UCL Press, pp. 2-11.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994) ‘Educational choice, control and inequity.’ In David Scott (ed.) Accountability and Control in Educational Settings, London, Cassell, pp. 73-86.
  • Colin Poyntz and Geoffrey Walford (1994) ‘The new Christian schools: A survey.’  Educational Studies, 20, 1, pp. 127-143.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994) ‘The new religious grant-maintained schools.’ Educational Management and Administration, 22, 2, pp. 123-130.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994)   ‘Weak choice, strong choice and the new Christian schools.’ In J. Mark Halstead (ed.)  Parental Choice and Education: Principles, policies and practice,  London, Kogan Page, pp. 139-150.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1993)  ‘Self-managing schools, choice and equity.’ In John Smyth (ed.) A Socially Critical View of the Self-Managing School, Basingstoke, Falmer, pp. 229-244.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1993)  ‘Selection for secondary schooling.’  In Briefings for the Paul Hamlyn Foundation National Commission on Education,  London, Heinemann, pp. 89-102.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1993) ‘The real lessons in school reform from Britain.’ Educational Policy, 7, 2, pp. 212-222.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1993) ‘Girls’ private schooling: past and present.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) The Private Schooling of Girls: Past and present, London, Woburn Press, pp. 9-32.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1992)  Selection for Secondary Schooling National Commission on Education Briefing Paper No. 7,  October.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1992) ‘Educational reform in the 1980s: National case studies. Great Britain.’ In Peter W. Cookson, Jr., Alan R. Sadovnik and Susan F. Semel (eds.) International Handbook of Educational Reform, Westport, CT, USA, Greenwood Press, pp. 209-227.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1992) ‘Educational choice and equity in Great Britain.’ Educational Policy (USA), 6, (2) pp. 123-138.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1992) ‘The reform of higher education.’ In Madeline Arnot and Len Barton (eds.)  Voicing Concerns: Sociological Perspectives on contemporary educational reforms, Wallingford, Triangle Books, pp. 186-200.
  • Sharon Gewirtz, Henry Miller and Geoffrey Walford (1991) ‘Parents’ individualist and collectivist strategies at the City Technology College, Kingshurst.’ International Studies in Sociology of Education, 1, pp. 173-191.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991)  ‘The changing relationship between government and higher education in Britain.’  In Guy Neave and Frans van Vught (ed.) Prometheus Bound. The changing relationship between government and higher education in Western Europe, Oxford, Pergamon, pp. 165-183.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991) ‘Researching the City Technology College, Kingshurst.’  In Geoffrey Walford (ed.)Doing Educational Research, London, Routledge, pp. 82-100.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991)  ‘Reflexive accounts of doing educational research.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.)  Doing Educational Research, London, Routledge, pp. 1-17.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991)  ‘Choice of school at the first City Technology College.’ Educational Studies, 17, 1, pp. 65-75.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991)  ‘City Technology Colleges: A private magnetism?’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.)  Private Schooling: Tradition, change and diversity, London, Paul Chapman, pp. 158-76.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991) ‘The reluctant private sector: of small schools, people and politics.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Private Schooling: tradition, change and diversity, London Paul Chapman, pp. 115-32.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1990)  ‘Developing choice in British education.’  Compare. A Journal of Comparative Education, 20, 1, pp 22-56.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1990) ‘The 1988 Education Reform Act for England and Wales: Paths to privatization.’ Educational Policy, 4, 2, pp. 127-44.
  • Mark H. Robson and Geoffrey Walford (1989) ‘Independent schools and tax policy under Mrs Thatcher.’ Journal of Education Policy, 4, 2, pp. 149-62.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1989) ‘Scotland: Changes in government policy towards private schools.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.)  Private Schools in Ten Countries: Policy and practice, London, Routledge, pp. 32-56.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1989)  ‘Private schools policy and practice in comparative perspective.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Private Schools in Ten Countries: Policy and practice, London, Routledge, pp. 1-7.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1989)  ‘Bullying in public schools: Myth and reality.’ In Delwyn P. Tattum and David Lane (eds.) Bullying in Schools, London, Trentham Books, pp. 81-88.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1988)  ‘Young people’s views about the Youth Training Scheme in Scotland.’ British Journal of Sociology of Education, 9, 4, pp. 437-51.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1988)  ‘Shouts of joy and cries of pain: investigating young people’s comments on leaving school and entering the labour market.’ In David Raffe (ed.)  Education and the Youth Labour Market: Schooling and scheming, Lewes, Falmer, pp. 243-65.
  • Geoffrey Walford, June Purvis and Andrew Pollard (1988)  ‘Ethnography, policy and the emergence of the new vocationalism.’  In Andrew Pollard, June Purvis and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) Education, Training and the New Vocationalism: Experience and policy, Milton Keynes, Open University Press, pp. 3-14.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1988) ‘Training the elite – for education, training and jobs.’ Collected Original Resources in Education, 12, 1, pp. 1-19.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1988)  ‘The privatisation of British higher education.’ European Journal of Education, 23, 1/2, pp. 47-64.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1988)  ‘The Scottish Assisted Places Scheme. A comparative study of the origins, nature and practice of the APS in Scotland, England & Wales.’ Journal of Education Policy, 3, 2, pp. 137-53.
  • Mark H. Robson and Geoffrey Walford (1988)  ‘U.K. tax policy and independent schools.’ British Tax Review, 2, pp. 38-54.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1987)  ‘How important is the independent sector in Scotland’ Scottish Educational Review, 19, 2, pp. 108-21.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1987)  ‘How dependent is the independent sector?’ Oxford Review of Education, 13, 3, pp. 275-96.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1987)  ‘Research role conflicts and compromises in public schools.’  In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Doing Sociology of Education, Lewes, Falmer, pp. 45-65.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1987)  ‘The research process.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Doing Sociology of Education, Lewes, Falmer, pp. 1-15.
  • Geoffrey Walford and Sïan Jones (1986) ‘The Solihull adventure. An attempt to reintroduce selective education.’  Journal of Education Policy, 1, 3, pp. 239-53.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1986)  ‘Ruling-class classification and framing.’  British Educational Research Journal, 12, 2, pp. 183-95.
  • Henry Miller and Geoffrey Walford (1986) ‘A case study of financial constraints in British universities.’ IHELG Monograph, Number 86/5, Institute for Higher Education Law and Governance, University of Houston, Texas, USA.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1985)  ‘The influence of external pressure groups on the school curriculum: Two examples.’  Collected Original Resources in Education, 9, 2, pp. 1-45.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1985)  ‘The construction of a curriculum area.’ British Journal of Sociology of Education, 6, 2, pp. 155-71.
  • Henry Miller and Geoffrey Walford (1985)  ‘University cut and thrust.’  In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Schooling in Turmoil, Beckenham, Croom Helm, pp. 244-68.
  • Richard Thompson and Geoffrey Walford (1985)  ‘Teachers learning about industry: The two curricula and cultural disadvantage.’  In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Schooling in Turmoil, Beckenham, Croom Helm, pp. 59-83.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1984)  ‘The changing professionalism of public school teachers.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) British Public Schools: Policy and practice, Lewes, Falmer, pp. 111-35.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1984)   ‘The numbering of postgraduate research.’  Higher Education Review, 16, 2, pp. 61-65.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1983)  ‘Science education and sexism in the Soviet Union.’  School Science Review, 85, 2, pp. 213-24.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1983)  ‘Postgraduate education and the student’s contribution to research.’ British Journal of Sociology of Education, 4, 3, pp. 241-54.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1983) ‘Research state and research style: A sociological analysis of postgraduate education.’  Collected Original Resources in Education, 7, 1, pp. 1-108.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1983)  ‘Science textbook images and the reproduction of sexual divisions in society.’ Research in Science and Technological Education, 1, 1, pp. 65-72.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1983)  ‘Parental attitudes and girls in physical science.’ School Science Review, 64, pp. 566-67.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1983)  ‘Girls in boys’ public schools: A prelude to further research.’ British Journal of Sociology of Education, 4, 1, pp. 39-54.
  • Leo Raby and Geoffrey Walford (1981) ‘Job status aspirations and their determinants for middle and lower stream pupils in an urban, multi-racial comprehensive school.’ British Educational Research Journal, 7, 2, pp. 173-81.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1981)  ‘Classification and framing in higher education.’ Studies in Higher Education, 6, 2, pp. 147-58.
  • Leo Raby and Geoffrey Walford (1981) ‘Career related attitudes and their determinants for middle- and low-stream pupils in an urban, multi-racial comprehensive school.’ Research in Education, 25, pp. 19-35.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1980) ‘Why physics students start doctorates.’ Studies in Higher Education, 5, 1, pp. 77-80.

Books

  • Geoffrey Walford (2006) Markets and Equity in Education London, Continuum, ISBN: 0 8264 8735 1.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2005) Private Education: tradition and continuity
    London, Continuum, ISBN: 0 8264 8599 5.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) Doing Qualitative Educational Research: a personal guide to the research process, London, Continuum. ISBN: 0-8264-4701-5,  0-8264-4702-3.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2000) Policy, Politics and Education – sponsored grant-maintained schools and religious diversity, Aldershot, Ashgate. ISBN: 0-7456-1031-4.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1996) Public School, Japanese edition of Life in Public Schools, translated by Yo Takeuchi. Japan, Sekai Shisosha Kyogakusha. ISBN: 4-7907-0626-5.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995) Educational Politics: Pressure groups and faith-based schools, Aldershot, Avebury, ISBN: 1-85628-907-9.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994) Choice and Equity in Education, London, Cassell, ISBN: 0-304-32775-1,  0-304-32774-3.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1993) Contemporary British Education and Privatization, Japanese edition of Privatization and Privilege in Education with new forward and postscript, translated by Norio Iwahashi, Kyoto, Japan, Houritu-Bunka-sha, ISBN: 4589-01705-9.
  • Geoffrey Walford and Henry Miller (1991) City Technology College, Milton Keynes, Open University Press, ISBN: 0335 09275 6.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1990) Privatization and Privilege in Education, London & New York, Routledge, ISBN: 0415 04247 X,  0415 04248 8.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1987) Restructuring Universities: Politics and power in the management of change, Beckenham, Croom Helm, ISBN: 07099 3694 X.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1986) Life in Public Schools, London, Methuen, ISBN: 0416 37170 1,  0416 37180 9.
  • Richard Thompson and Geoffrey Walford (1983) Teachers into Industry, Birmingham, AEEM, ISBN: 0903 703 14 9.

Edited books

  • Prachi Srivastava and Geoffrey Walford (2018) Non-State Actors in Education in the Global South. London, Routledge. ISBN: 978-1-138-57067-2 (hb), 143 pp.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2016)(ed.) Academies, Free Schools and social Justice (Didcot, Routledge) ISBN 13: 978-1-138-96007-7, 118 pp.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2016)(ed.) Privatization, Education and Social Justice (Didcot, Routledge) ISBN 13: 978-1-138-59439-7, 150 pp.
  • Ian Macpherson, Susan Robertson and Geoffrey Walford (eds.)(2014) Education, Privatisation, and Social Justice: Case studies from Africa, South Asia, and South East Asia (Abingdon, Symposium)
  • Geoffrey Walford, Eric Tucker and Madhu Viswanathan (2010) (eds.) The Sage Handbook of Measurement (London, Sage) ISBN: 978-1-4129-4814-2.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2010) (ed.) Blair’s Educational Legacy? (London, Routledge) ISBN: 0-415-48305-0.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) (ed.) How to do Educational Ethnography, London, Tufnell Press, ISBN: 978-1-872767-92-5 (pb).
  • Martin Forsey, Scott Davies and Geoffrey Walford (2008(eds.) The Globalisation of School VChoice? Abingdon, Symposium Books, ISBN: 978-1-873927-12-0 (pb).
  • Prachi Srivastava and Geoffrey Walford (2007) (eds.) Private Schooling in Less-Economically Developed Countries: Asian and African Perspectives Abingdon, Symposium Books. ISBN: 978-1-873927-85-4 (pb).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2007) (ed.) Methodological Developments in Ethnography (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 12) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, Elsevier.  ISBN: 0-7623-1437-0 (hb).
  • David Phillips and Geoffrey Walford (2006) (eds.) Tracing Education Policy: Selections for the Oxford Review of Education Abingdon, Routledge. ISBN: 0-413-39861-4 (hb).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2006) (ed.) Education and the Labour Government: an evaluation of two termsAbingdon, Routledge. ISBN: 0 415 36870 7 (hb).
  • Geoff Troman, Bob Jeffrey and Geoffrey Walford (2005) (eds.) Methodological issues and practices in Ethnography. (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 11) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, Elsevier.  ISBN: 0-7623-1252-1 (hb).
  • Geoff Troman, Bob Jeffrey and Geoffrey Walford (2004) (eds.) Identity, Agency, and Social Institutions in Educational Ethnography. (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 10) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, Elsevier. ISBN: 0-7623-1144-4 (hb).
  • Bob Jeffrey and Geoffrey Walford (2004) (eds.)Ethnographies of Educational and Cultural Conflicts: Strategies and resolutions. (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 9) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, Elsevier. ISBN: 07623-11126 (hb).
  • Holger Daun and Geoffrey Walford (2004) (eds.) Educational Strategies among Muslims in the Context of Globalization. Leiden, Brill. ISBN: 90-04-13675-4 (hb).
  • Geoffrey Walford and W. S. F. Pickering (2003) (ed.) Durkheim and Modern Education, Japanese Edition. Tokyo, Tokyo Metropolitan University Press. ISBN: 4-88683-496-5 (hb).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) (ed.) British Private Schools: research on policy and practice, London, Woburn Press. ISBN: 0-7130-0228-X,  0-7130-4048-3.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) (ed.) Investigating Educational Policy through Ethnography, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume  Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-1018-9 (hb).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) (ed.) Doing a Doctorate in Educational Ethnography, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 7) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-0906-7 (hb).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2002) (ed.) Debates and Developments in Ethnographic Methodology, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 6) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-0893-1.
  • Phil Carspecken and Geoffrey Walford (2001) (eds.) Critical Educational Ethnography,
    (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 5) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-0797-8.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2001) (ed.) Ethnography and Education Policy, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 4) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-0768-4.
  • Geoffrey Walford and Caroline Hudson (2000) (eds.) Genders and Sexualities in Educational Ethnography, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 3) Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-0738-2.
  • W. S. F. Pickering and Geoffrey Walford (2000) (eds.) Durkheim’s Suicide: a century of research and debate, London & New York, Routledge. ISBN: 0-415-20582-4.
  • Alexander Massey and Geoffrey Walford (1999) (eds.) Explorations in Methodology, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 2) Stamford, CT, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-7623-0563-0.
  • Geoffrey Walford and Alexander Massey (1998) (eds.) Children Learning in Context, (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 1). London & Greenwich, CT, JAI Press. ISBN: 0-76230-436-7.
  • Geoffrey Walford and W. S. F. Pickering (1998) (eds.) Durkheim and Modern Education, London & New York, Routledge. ISBN: 0-415-18168-2.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1998) (ed.) Doing Research about Education, London & Washington D.C., Falmer. ISBN: 0-7507-0782-8,  0-7507-0783-6.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1997) (ed.) Choice, Diversity and Equity in Secondary Schooling, Special Issue of Oxford Review of Education. ISSN:  0305-4985 .
  • Richard Pring and Geoffrey Walford (1997) (eds.) Affirming the Comprehensive Ideal, London & Washington D.C., Falmer. ISBN: 0-7507-0619-8,  0-7507-0620-1.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1996) (ed.) School Choice and the Quasi-Market, Special Issue of Oxford Studies in Comparative Education, Wallingford, Triangle Books. ISBN: 1-873927-23-1.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1995) (ed.) La Otra Cara de la Investigación Educativa, Spanish edition of Doing Educational Research, translated by Javier Orduna Cosmen. Madrid, La Muralla. ISBN: 84-7133-646-4.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1994) (ed.) Researching the Powerful in Education, London, UCL Press, ISBN: 1-85728-133-0, 1-85728-134-9.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1993) (ed.) The Private Schooling of Girls: Past and present, London, Woburn Press, ISBN: 0-7130-0186-0.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1992) (ed.) Privatne Skole. Iskustva u deset zemalja, Croatian edition of Private Schools in Ten Countries, translated by Mirna Varlandy Supek, Zagreb, Croatia, EDUCA Publishing House, ISBN: 86-7841-002-7.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991) (ed.) Doing Educational Research, London, Routledge, ISBN: 0415 05289 0,  0415 05290 4.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1991) (ed.) Private Schooling: Tradition, change and diversity, London, Paul Chapman, ISBN: 185396 116 7.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1989) (ed.) Private Schools in Ten Countries: Policy and practice, London & New York, Routledge, ISBN: 0415 03464 7.
  • Andrew Pollard, June Purvis and Geoffrey Walford (1988) (eds.) Education, Training and the New Vocationalism: experience and policy, Milton Keynes & Philadelphia, Open University Press, ISBN: 0335 15845 5,  0335 15844 7.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1987) (ed.) Doing Sociology of Education, Lewes & Philadelphia, Falmer, ISBN: 085000 145 6,  085000 146 4.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1985) (ed.) Schooling in Turmoil, Beckenham, Croom Helm, ISBN: 07099 3618 4.
  • Geoffrey Walford (1984) (ed.) British Public Schools: Policy and practice,
    Lewes & Philadelphia, Falmer, ISBN: 0905 273 84 2,  0905 273 83 4.

Anne’s main areas of research in Mathematics Education are exemplification and task design in mathematics teaching and learning, from a variation theory perspective; the role of mathematics education in social justice issues; the use of fine-grained approaches to analysis of mathematics interaction within socio-cultural perspectives and the school mathematics curriculum.

Detailed information, papers, presentations and activities can be found on her website at pmtheta.com and on researchgate.net.

Anne convened and co-edited an Study on Task Design for the International Committee on Mathematics Education and has co-authored a book about learning key ideas in secondary mathematics – Key Ideas in Teaching Mathematics for Oxford University Press.

Her most recent publication is the book: Care in Mathematics Education published by Palgrave-Macmillan.

She is a member of the Association of Teachers of Mathematics (ATM), the British Society for Research into the Learning of Mathematics, the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education and the Higher Education Academy and the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group. She is a Fellow of the International Society for Design and Development in Education.  In retirement she runs, with her husband John Mason, free workshops for teachers and others on key conceptual themes that run throughout mathematics (see pmtheta@home on pmtheta.com).

Anne is a member of the Quaker Values in Education Group of the Society of Friends, see: Rowe, D. and Watson, A. (eds.) (2018)  Faith and Experience in Education: essays on Quaker perspectives. London: Trentham Press.

Activities in curriculum
  • Two syntheses of research about how children learn mathematics for the Nuffield Foundation: Key Understandings in Learning Mathematics (with Nunes and Bryant) and Key Ideas in Teaching Mathematics (with Jones and Pratt).
  • Member of the expert drafting panel for the primary and secondary mathematics National Curriculum for the Department for Education.
  • Curriculum Advisor to the Welsh Assembly.
Publications
Selected recent papers
  • Biza, I., Hewitt, A., Watson, A., Mason, J. (2019) Generalization Strategies in Finding the nth Term Rule for Simple Quadratic Sequences. International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, (), 1-22 DOI 10.1007/s10763-019-10009-0
  • Venkat, H., Askew, M., Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2019) Architecture of Mathematical Structure. FLM 39(1), 19-23.
  • Biza, I., Hewitt, A., Watson, A., Mason, J. (2019) Generalization Strategies in Finding the nth Term Rule for Simple Quadratic Sequences. International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, (), 1-22 DOI 10.1007/s10763-019-10009-0
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2018) A tale of two digital games: How discussion can augment personal narratives. In R. Zazkis & P. Herbst (eds) Scripting approaches in mathematics education: Mathematical dialogues in research and practice.  73-88. Springer Publishers.
  • Al-Murani, T., Kilhamn, C., Morgan, D., & Watson, A. (2018). Opportunities for learning: the use of variation to analyse examples of a paradigm shift in teaching primary mathematics in England. Research in Mathematics Education, 1-19.
  • Watson, A., Ayalon, M., & Lerman, S. (2018). Comparison of students’ understanding of functions in classes following English and Israeli national curricula. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 97(3), 255-272.
  • Ayalon, M., Watson, A. & Lerman, S. (2016) Students’ conceptualisations of function revealed through definitions and examples. Research in Mathematics Education. 19(1), 1-19
  • Watson, A. (2016) Pedagogy of variations: synthesis of various notions of variation pedagogy in Huang, R. & Li, Y. (eds.) Teaching and learning mathematics through variation. p85-105. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers
  • Ayalon, M., Watson, A. & Lerman, S. (2016) Reasoning about variables in 11 to 18 year olds: informal, schooled and formal expression in learning about functions. Mathematics Education Research Journal. 28(3), 379-404.
  • Ayalon, M., Watson, A., & Lerman, S. (2015). Progression Towards Functions: Students’ Performance on Three Tasks About Variables from Grades 7 to 12. International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, 90(3), 321-339
  • Ayalon, M., Watson, A. and Lerman, S. (2015) Functions represented as linear sequential data: relationships between presentation and student responses Educational Studies in Mathematics.Online DOI 10.1007/s10649-015-9628-9
  • Watson, A. and Ohtani, M. (2015) Themes and issues in mathematics education concerning task design: Editorial introduction. In Watson, A. and Ohtani, M. (eds.) Task Design in Mathematics Education: An ICMI study.  (pp. 3-18 ) Heidelberg: Springer
  • Watson, A. and Thompson, D. (2015) Design issues related to text-based tasks. In Watson, A. and Ohtani, M. (eds.) Task Design in Mathematics Education: An ICMI study.  (pp.143-190) Heidelberg: Springer.
  • Watson, A., De Geest, E. (2014) Department-initiated change. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(3), 351-368.
Selected Books
  • Watson, A. (2021) Care in Mathematics Education: Alternative educational spaces and practices. Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Watson, A. (ed.) (2018) Variation in mathematics: A collection of writings from ATM Mathematics Teaching. Association of Teachers of Mathematics, Derby, UK.
  • Watson, A. and Ohtani, M. (2015) (Eds.) Task Design in Mathematics Education: An ICMI study.  Heidelberg: Springer.
  • Watson, A.,  Jones, K. and Pratt, D. (2013)  Key Ideas in Teaching Mathematics: Research-based guidance for ages 9-19 (Oxford University Press + Nuffield website)
  • Watson and P. Winbourne (eds.) (2007) New Directions for Situated Cognition in Learning Mathematics, pub. Springer
  • Watson, A. (2006) Raising Achievement in Secondary Mathematics Maidenhead, Open University Press
  • Watson, A. and Mason, J. (2005) Mathematics as a constructive activity: learners generating examples. Lawrence Erlbaum Publishers.

David Phillips is Emeritus Professor of Comparative Education, and Emeritus Fellow of St Edmund Hall.

A linguist by origin, David Phillips now works exclusively on various aspects of comparative and international education, with a particular focus on policy issues in historical context. He is the author of many publications, especially on education in Germany (more particularly in the post-war and post-unification periods) and on policy ‘borrowing’ in education. He has edited  Comparative Education, Research in Comparative and International Education, and the Oxford Review of Education and  and serves on the editorial boards of various other journals; he also edits the book series Oxford Studies in Comparative Education. He is co-chair of the Anglo-German Educational Research Group (www.aerg.org)

He has been Chair of the British Association for Comparative and International Education (BAICE). In 1990-91 he served on a commission of the German Wissenschaftsrat which reported to the German government on the future of teacher education in the territory of the former German Democratic Republic, and he has (2003-4) been a member of a commission appointed by the Minister for Science, Culture and the Arts in Baden-Württemberg with the task of evaluating educational studies in higher education in that state of the Federal Republic of Germany. He has evaluated projects for the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft and for other research bodies. He is a Fellow of the Social Sciences Academy and a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society.

Professor Phillips’s main teaching involved theoretical and methodological issues in comparative education, educational policy in Western Europe (particularly EU countries) and in Eastern Europe, in Japan, and in the United States. Many of his doctoral students focused on education in Germany and Japan, and on a range of topics involving education and training policy in the European Union as well as on aspects of educational policy borrowing in a variety of contexts.

Publications
  • Zur Universitätsreform in der Britischen Besatzungszone 1945-1948, Böhlau 1983
  • (Editor): Hochschuloffiziere und Wiederaufbau des Hochschulwesens in Westdeutschland 1945-1952, Teil 1: Die Britische Zone, Lax, 1990
  • (Editor): Lessons of Cross-National Comparison in Education, Triangle Books, 1992
  • (Editor, with Michael Kaser): Education and Economic Change in Eastern Europe, Triangle Books, 1992
  • Pragmatismus und Idealismus: Das ‘Blaue Gutachten’ und die Britische Hochschulpolitik in Deutschland 1948, Böhlau, 1995
  • (Editor, with others): Education for Reconstruction, Symposium Books, 1998
  • (Editor): Education in Germany: Tradition and Reform in Historical Context, Routledge, 1995
  • (Editor, with Michael Kaser): Aspects of Education and the European Union, Triangle Books, 1995
  • (Editor, with others): Learning From Comparing: New Directions in Comparative Educational Research , Vol. 1, Contexts, Classrooms and Outcomes, Symposium Books, 1999 (with Robin Alexander and Patricia Broadfoot); Vol.2, Policy, Professionals and Development,: Symposium Books, 2000 (with Robin Alexander and Marilyn Osborn)
  • (Editor): Education in Eastern Germany Since Unification, Symposium Books, 2000
  • ‘Reconstructing Education in Germany: Some Similarities and Contrasts in the Post-War and Post-Unification Rethinking in Educational Provision’, in: Leslie J. Limage (ed): Democratizing Education and Educating Democratic Citizens: International and Historical Perspectives, New York (Routledge/Falmer), 2001
  • ‘Helena Deneke and the Women of Germany. A Note on Post-War Reconstruction’, German Life and Letters, Vol.53 No.1, 2000
  • Reflections on British Interest in Education in Germany in the Nineteenth Century. (A Progress Report), Educa, Lisbon, 2002
  • ‘Comparative Historical Studies in Education: Problems of Periodisation Reconsidered’, British Journal of Educational Studies, Vol.50, No.3, 2002
  • ‘Beyond Travellers’ Tales: Some Nineteenth-Century British Commentators on Education in Germany’, Oxford Review of Education, Vol.26 No.1, 2000
  • ‘Comparative Studies and “Cross-National Attraction” in Education: a typology for the analysis of English interest in educational policy and provision in Germany, Educational Studies, Vol.28, No.4, 2002 (with Kimberly Ochs)
  • ‘Processes of Policy Borrowing in Education: Some Explanatory and Analytical Devices, (with Kimberly Ochs), Comparative Education, Vol. 39, No.4, 2003
  • (Editor, with Roger Goodman): Can the Japanese Change Their Education System? Symposium Books, 2003
  • (Editor, with Hubert Ertl): Implementing European Union Education and Training Policy: A Comparative Study of Issues in Four Member States, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2003
  • Articles on ‘Helena Deneke’, ‘Evelyn Spearing’, and ‘Edith Wardale’, New Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004
  • ‘Researching Policy Borrowing: Some Methodological Problems in Comparative Education’, British Educational Research Journal, Vol.30 No.6, 2004 (with Kimberly Ochs)
  • ‘A Typology of Cross-National Attraction in Education’, in: Gita Steiner-Khamsi (ed.): The Global Politics of Educational Borrowing and Lending, Teachers College Press, 2004
  • (Editor, with Kimberly Ochs): Educational Policy Borrowing: Historical Perspectives, Symposium Books, 2004
  • ‘Policy Borrowing in Education: Frameworks for Analysis’, in: Joseph Zajda (ed.): International Handbook on Globalisation, Education and Policy Research: Global Pedagogies and Policies, Springer, 2005
  • ‘Comparative Education: An Approach to Educational Inquiry’, in: Clifton Conrad and Ronald Serlin (eds.): The Sage Handbook on Research in Education: Engaging Ideas and Enriching Inquiry, Sage, 2005
  • ‘Michael Sadler and Comparative Education’, Oxford Review of Education, Vol. 32, No.1, 2006
  • Comparative and International Education: An Introduction to Theory, Method and Practice, Continuum, 2006 (with Michele Schweisfurth)
  • (Editor): Special issue of Comparative Education on ‘Mapping EU Education and Training Policy’, Vol.42, No.1, 2006
  • (Editor): Special issue of Oxford Review of Education on ‘Comparative Inquiry and Educational Policy Making’, Vol.42, No.3, 2006
  • The German Example: English Interest in Educational Provision in Germany Since 1800, Continuum 2011
  • ‘Aspects of Education for Democratic Citizenship in Post-War Germany, Oxford Review of Education, Vol.38, No.6, 2012
  • Investigating Education in Germany: Historical Studies from a British Perspective, Routledge 2015
  • Educating the Germans. People and Policy in the British Zone of Germany, 1945-1949, 2018
Research

David Phillips’s main research interests are in education in Germany, transition in education in eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, educational policy ‘borrowing’, theoretical perspectives in comparative education, and EU education and training policy.

Much of David Phillips’s recent research has been in the area of educational policy borrowing and in EU education and training policy. He recently (1998-2002 inclusive) directed a five-year EU-funded project (PRESTIGE – ‘Problems of Educational Standardisation and Transition in a Global environment’) in this latter area, and oversaw and contributed to the many publications which emerged from the project. Currently the focus of his work is on British interest in educational provision in Germany over the past 200 years. In 2005, together with Alis Oancea, he organised an international seminar funded by the European Science Foundation on the subject ‘15 Years On: Post-communist transitions and European integration of central and eastern European Countries’.

One of his recent books is The German Example: English Interest in Educational Provision in Germany Since 1800 (Continuum,2011), and he has most recently published Educating the Germans, a study of British educational policy in occupied Germany, 1945-1949.  The research for this book was supported by a Leverhulme Trust Emeritus Fellowship awarded in 2012. In 2015 Routledge published Investigating Education in Germany: Historical Studies from a British Perspective. 

Professor of Sociology of Education in the Department of Education from 2010-2015, and before that Director of the Centre for Educational Sociology (CES), University of Edinburgh, Jenny also worked at Strathcyde, Keele, UWE Bristol, and the Open University.

She is an Honorary Professorial Visiting Fellow in the School of Social and Political Sciences, the University of Edinburgh, and has an attachment to the University of Umea, Sweden. She is a Fellow of the British Academy and has been a visiting scholar at Helsinki University, Finland. She holds an honorary doctorate from Turku University, Finland and is a member of the ESF College of Expert Reviewers. She teaches on the EU funded summer school in European Education Studies (SUSEES). The MOOC may be accessed here http://www.susees.eu/mooc-2017-lecture-2-governing-education-europe-changing-role-knowledge/

Research

Jenny’s most recent funded research was a Leverhulme Emeritus Fellowship, on Governing Education: knowledge and policy in England and Scotland since 1986. The study investigates the changing relationship between knowledge and policy in governing education in the period 1986-2015 in England and Scotland.

Jenny also continues to research and publish on education policy with a focus on governance and governing, through investigation of the resources that are being mobilized by new governing forms and through new policy technologies. She works in collaboration with colleagues in the UK and Europe, located in a variety of disciplines-including political science and social policy.

Publications
Recent books
  • Ozga, J (2016) (ed) Sage Library of Educational Thought and Practice: Sociology of Education (four volumes)
  • Fenwick. T., Mangez, E., and Ozga.J. (Eds) (2014) Governing Knowledge: Comparison, Knowledge-Based Technologies and Expertise in the Regulation of Education, (World Yearbook of Education 2014) London, Routledge
  • 2011: Fabricating Quality in Europe: data and education governance (edited with Peter Dahler-Larsen, Christina Segerholm and Hannu Simola London, Routledge
  • 2007: Lingard, B and Ozga, J (eds) The Routledge Reader in Education Policy and Politics, London, Routledge.
  • 2006: Ozga, J. Seddon T and Popkewitz T.S. (eds) Research and Policy: steering the knowledge-based Economy (World Yearbook of Education 2006) London, Routledge
Recent articles
  • Ozga, Jenny (2021) Problematising policy: the development of (critical) policy sociology, Critical Studies in Education, 62:3, 290-305, DOI: 10.1080/17508487.2019.1697718
  • Ozga, Jenny (2021) Who governs? Political leadership in transnational times, School Leadership & Management, 41:1-2, 6-21, DOI: 10.1080/13632434.2020.1789857
  • Ozga, Jenny (2020) The politics of accountability. Journal of Educational Change 21, 19–35 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10833-019-09354-2
  • Ozga, Jenny, & Arnott, M. A. (2019). Governando para além do PISA: conhecimento, redes e narrativas. [Governing Beyond PISA: knowledge, networks and narratives] Roteiro,44(3), 1-22. https://doi.org/10.18593/r.v44i3.21004
  • Ozga, J (2017) ‘Education policy should not be driven by performance data’ Nature: Human Behaviour Vol 1 Issue 1 http://www.nature.com/articles/s41562-016-0014
  • Ozga, Jenny (2016) Trust in numbers? Digital Education Governance and the inspection process  European Educational Research Journal Vol. 15(1) 69–81
  • Margaret Arnott & Jenny Ozga (2016) Education and nationalism in Scotland: governing a ‘learning nation’, Oxford Review of Education, 42:3, 253-265, DOI: 10.1080/03054985.2016.1184865
  • Ozga J and Lawn, M (2014) Frameworks of Regulation: Evidence, Knowledge and Judgement in Inspection Introduction to Special issue of Sisyphus, Journal of Education Volume 2 Issue 1 pp 7-16 (available at http://revista.rcap.pt/sisyphus)
  • Ozga, J (2014) Knowledge, Inspection and the Work of Governing Special issue of Sisyphus, Journal of Education Volume 2 Issue 1 pp16-40 (available at http://revista.rcap.pt/sisyphus)
  • Ozga, J and Lawn, M (2014) Inspectorates and Politics-the trajectories of inspection in England and Scotland  Revue Francaise de Pedagogie 186 pp11-23
  • Ozga, J Baxter, J, Clarke, J. Grek, S and Lawn M (2013) ‘The Politics of Educational Change: Governing and School Inspection in England and Scotland’ Swiss Journal of Sociology 39(2) 205-224.
  • Ozga J (2013) ‘Accountability as a Policy Technology: accounting for education performance in Europe’ International Review of Administrative Science 79 (2) 292-309.
  • Grek, S Lawn, M Ozga, J and Segerholm, C (2013) ‘Governing by Inspection? European Inspectorates and the creation of a European Education Policy Space Comparative Education, 49 (4) 486-502
  • Grek S and Ozga J (2012) Governing through Learning: School Self-Evaluation as a Knowledge-based Regulatory Tool. Recherches sociologiques et anthropologiqes 2012/2 83-103
  • Ozga J (2012) ‘Governing knowledge: data, inspection and education policy in Europe’ Globalisation, Societies and Education
  • Ozga J (2011) Knowledge Stocks and Flows: Data and Education Governance in Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities (Eds) Tara Fenwick and Lesley Farrell, London Routledge
  • Ozga J (2011) Governing Narratives: ‘local’ meanings and globalising education policy Education Inquiry 2 (2) June pp 305-318
  • Ozga J (2011) ‘Knowledge Transfer and Transformation: moving knowledge from research to policy’  PERSPECTIVA, Florianópolis, v. 29, n. 1, 49-67, jan./jun. 2011
  • Ozga J (2011) Researching the Powerful: Seeking Knowledge about Policy European Educational Research Journal Volume 10 Number 2 2011 pp 218-224
  • Arnott, M.A. & Ozga, J. (2010) ‘Nationalism, Governance and Policy Making: The SNP in Power’ Public Money and Management, vol.30 no.2 pp.91-97
  • Arnott, M. and Ozga J. (2010) Education and Nationalism: the discourse of education policy in Scotland Discourse 31(3 ) 335-350
  • Grek S and Ozga J (2010) Governing Education through Data: Scotland, England and the European Education Policy Space British Education Research Journal 36 (6) 937-952
  • Grek, S. and Ozga, J. (2010) ‘Re-inventing Public Education: the new role of knowledge in education policy-making’, Public Policy and Administration 25 (3) 271-288
  • Ozga, J. (2009) Governing Education through Data in England: From Regulation to Self-Evaluation, Special Issue of Journal of Education Policy, 24(2) 149-163
  • Grek, S.,Lawn M, Lingard, B Ozga, J. Rinne, R., Segerholm, C.and Simola, H. (2009) ‘National policy brokering and the construction of the European Education Space in England, Sweden, Finland and Scotland’  Comparative Education 45(1) 5-22
  • Ozga J (2008) Governing Knowledge: research steering and research quality, European  Educational Research Journal, 7(3), pp.261-272.
  • Byrne D and Ozga J (2008) Education Research and Policy Research Papers in Education, 23(4), pp.377-407
  • Ozga, J (2007) Knowledge and Policy: Research and Knowledge Transfer Critical Studies in Education 48 (1) pp63-78
Recent book chapters
  • Ozga, Jenny (2020) Elites and Expertise: The Changing Material Production of Knowledge for Policy in Fan, Guorui and Popkewitz, Thomas (Eds.) Handbook of Education Policy Studies volume 1 Values, Governance, Globalization, and Methodology (https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9789811383465)
  • Ozga, J (2019) ‘Governing and Knowledge: Theorising the Relationship’ in Langer, R and Brusemeister, T Handbuch Educational Governance Theorien Springer
  • Ozga J (2017) ‘Education and Nationalism in Scotland: nationalism as a governing resource’ in Kantasalmi, K and Holm, G (eds) The State, Schooling and Identity Singapore, Palgrave Macmillan/Springer
  • Ozga, Jenny (2015) Working Knowledge: Data, Expertise and Inspection in the Governing of Education in Kotthoff H-G and Klerides, E (eds) Governing Educational Spaces Knowledge, Teaching, and Learning in Transition Rotterdam, Sense Publishers  pp 15-35 https://www.sensepublishers.com/media/2526-governing-educational-spaces.pdf
  • Ozga J and Dubois-Shaik F (2015) ‘Referencing Europe:usages  of Europe in National Identity Projects’ in Carter, C and Lawn, M (eds) Governing Europe’s Spaces: European Union Re-imagined Manchester, Manchester University Press
  • Ozga J and Segerholm C (2015) Neo-Liberal Agendas in Education in Grek, S and Lindgren, J (eds) Governing by Inspection Routledge pp27-38
  • Ozga J, Lawn M (2015) The History and Development of Inspectorates in England, Sweden and Scotland in Grek, S and Lindgren, J (eds) Governing by Inspection Routledge pp58-74
  • Lawn M and Ozga J (2012) Making Good Progress? Governing by Inspection: a post-comparative approach. Helsinki, Finnish Education Research Association.
  • Arnott M and Ozga J  (2012) ‘Education, Nationalism and Social Justice in Scott, G. & Mooney, G. (eds) Social Justice and Social Policy: the Politics of Social Policy in Scotland, Bristol, Policy Press
  • Ozga J (2012) ‘Trans-national Technologies and National Contexts: a Comparative Analysis of Education Policy in Scotland and England’ in Kauko, J Rinne R & Kynkäänniemi H (eds) Restructuring the Truth of Schooling – Essays on Discursive Practices in Sociology and the Politics of Education Helsinki, Finnish Educational Research Association
  • Arnott m and Ozga J (2010) ‘Education Policy & the SNP Government’ in Scott, G. & Mooney, G. (eds) (2010) Politics of Social Policy in Scotland, Policy Press

Ian is former President of BERA, 2013-2015. At OUDE he was Director of Professional Programmes and led the development of the Oxford Education Deanery.Before moving to Oxford, Ian was Professor of Teacher Education at the University of Glasgow. Prior to that he held posts at the University of the West of Scotland (Dean of Education and Media), London Metropolitan University (Head of School of Education), University of the West of England and the University of Gloucestershire.

Ian was President of the Scottish Educational Research Association from 2005–07 and chaired the Research and Development Committee of the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers from 2008-11. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts and is a Visiting Professor at Bath Spa University and Ulster University and an Honorary Professor at the University of Exeter. Since 2018 he has been a Senior Research Associate at Kazan Federal University, Russia.

Publications
Books
  • Menter, I., Muschamp, Y., Nicholls, P., Ozga, J. with Pollard, A. (1997) Work and Identity in the Primary School: A Post-Fordist Analysis Buckingham: Open University Press
  • Menter, I., Brisard, E. and Smith, I. (2006) Convergence or Divergence?: Initial teacher education in Scotland and England Edinburgh: Dunedin Academic Press.
  • Menter, I. and Murray, J. (eds.) (2011) Developing Research in Teacher Education, London: Routledge.
  • Menter, I., Elliot, D., Hulme, M., Lewin, J. and Lowden, K. (2011) A Guide to Practitioner Research in Education, London: Sage.
  • The Teacher Education Group (2015) Teacher Education in Times of Change. Bristol: Policy Press.
  • Peters, M., Cowie, B and Menter, I. (eds.) (2017) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education Research. Singapore: Springer.
  • Childs, A. and Menter, I. (eds.) (2018) Mobilising Teacher Researchers: challenging educational inequality. London: Routledge
  • Tatto, M.T. and Menter, I. (eds.) (2019) Knowledge, Policy and Practice in Teacher Education – A Cross-National Study. London: Bloomsbury.
Recent research reports
  • 2009 Final Report Curriculum for Excellence Draft Experiences and Outcomes: Collection, analysis and reporting of data for Learning and Teaching Scotland (Menter, I., Baumfield, V., Hulme, M., Devlin, A., Ellott, D., Hall, J., Hall, S. and Lowden, K.)
  • 2010 ‘Teachers: formation, training and identity’ (A literature review for Culture, Creativity and Education) (Menter, I.)
  • 2010 Literature Review on Teacher Education in the 21stCentury, Edinburgh: The Scottish Government. (Menter, I.,Hulme, M., Elliot, D. and Lewin, J.)
  • 2010 Research to support Schools of Ambition: Final Report, Edinburgh: The Scottish Government (Menter, I., Hulme, M., Christie, D., Payne, F., Coutts, N., Robson, D. and Spratt, J.)
  • 2011 Research to support Schools of Ambition: Final Report, Edinburgh: The Scottish Government (Menter, I., Hulme, M., Christie, D., Payne, F., Coutts, N., Robson, D. and Spratt, J.)
  • 2011 The Glasgow West Teacher Education Initiative: A Clinical Approach to Teacher Education. Evaluation Report. (Menter. I., Baumfield, V., Carroll, M., Dickson, B., Hulme, M., Lowden, K. and Mallon, W.) University of Glasgow.
  • 2012 The Glasgow West Teacher Education Initiative: Evaluation of second phase. Menter, I. and Lowden, K. Glasgow: The University of Glasgow.
  • 2013 Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools, funded by Citi Foundation (Aexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. and Menter, I.)
  • 2017 The role and contribution of higher education in contemporary teacher education. (Menter, I.) Commissioned by the Scottish Council of Deans of Education.
Recent book chapters
  • Menter, I. (2016) Teacher education – making connections with curriculum, pedagogy and assessment. In: Wyse, D., Hayward, L. and Pandya, J. (Eds.) The Sage Handbook of Curriculum, Pedagogy and Assessment. London: SAGE. pp 1015-1028.
  • Menter, I. (2016) ‘Foreword’ to Beckett, L. Teachers and Academic Partners in Urban Schools. London: Routledge.
  • Menter, I. and Walker, M. (2016) ‘School and society’ in Wyse, D. and Rogers, S. (Eds.) A Guide to Early Years and Primary Teaching. London: Sage.
  • Menter, I. (2016) Teacher education: generator of change or a mechanism for conformity? in Lees, H. and Noddings, N. (eds.) The Palgrave International Handbook of Alternative Education. London: Palgrave. 257-272.
  • Menter, I. (2017) ‘Reasons for education research’. In Wyse, D., Selwyn, N., Smith, E. and Suter, L. (Eds.) The BERA/SAGE Handbook of Educational Research. London: Sage. pp. 37-52.
  • Menter, I. (2017) ‘Diversity, development, devolution: the three Ds of UK teacher education and professional development in the twenty-first century’. In Florian, L. and Pantic, N. (Eds.) Teacher Education for the Changing Demographics of Schooling – Issues for research and practice. Cham, Switzerland: Springer. pp39-51.
  • Menter, I. (2017) ‘Teacher Education Research’ In Oxford Encyclopedia of Education. Oxford University Press. DOI: 10.1093/acrefore/9780190264093.013.275
  • Menter, I. (2018) ‘Teacher education in a crucible of change’ in Smith, L. and Wyatt, C. (Eds.) Innovation and Accountability in Teacher Education: Setting directions for new cultures in teacher education. Singapore: Springer. pp313-326.
  • Menter, I. and Reynolds, K. (2019) ‘Diversity in Teacher Education: Afterword’ In Sorensen, N. (Ed.) Diversity in Teacher Education. London: UCL IoE Books.
Recent journal articles
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. and Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: The Development of the Oxford Education Deanery Narrative. Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373.
  • Menter, I. (2015) Unity or disunity in the United Kingdom? Policy and practice in teacher education. Education and Self-Development. 2 (44),156-164.
  • Thompson, I., McNicholl, J. and Menter, I. (2016) Student teachers’ perceptions of poverty and educational achievement, Oxford Review of Education 42, 2, 214-229 DOI: 10.1080/03054985.2016.1164130
  • Menter, I. (2016) Helga Eng lecture 2015: What is a teacher in the 21st century and what does a 21st century teacher need to know? Acta Didactica Norge,10, 2, 11-25.
  • Lynch, D., Smith, R. and Menter, I. (2016) Reforming teacher education: from partnership to ‘syndication’. International Journal of Innovation, Creativity and Change. www.ijicc.net Volume 2, Issue 3.
  • Mutton, T., Burn, K. and Menter, I. (2017) Deconstructing the Carter Review: Competing conceptions of quality in England’s ‘school-led’ system of initial teacher education. Journal of Education Policy. 32, 1, 14-33. DOI: 10.1080/02680939.2016.1214751
  • Menter, I. (2017) Competences and Standards for Teachers and Teacher Education – Developments and Problems – a common approach for the United Kingdom? 26th Bulletin of the Japanese Society for the Study of Teacher Education. 8-19.
  • Menter, I., Valeeva, R. and Kalimullin, A. (2017) A tale of two countries – forty years on: politics and teacher education in Russia and England. European Journal of Teacher Education. 40, 5, 616-629.
  • Whiting, C., Whitty, G., Menter, I., Black, P., Hordern, J., Parfitt, A., Reynolds, K. and Sorenson, N. (2018) Diversity and Complexity: Becoming a teacher in England in 2015-16. Review of Education 6, 1, 69-96.
  • Menter, I. (2018) Defining teachers’ professional knowledge: the interaction of global and national influences. Education and Self-Development.13, 1, 32-42.
  • Loughran, J. and Menter, I. (2019) The essence of being a teacher educator and why it matters, Asia-Pacific Journal of Teacher Education, DOI:10.1080/1359866X.2019.1575946
Research and professional activity

Ian’s research interests are in teacher education and teachers’ work, with a particular interest in policy. He has carried out a number of ‘home international’ comparative studies within the UK, including ESRC-sponsored initiatives and has led projects commissioned by the Scottish Government and The National College for School Leadership. He led a research support team from OUDE working on the National College for Teaching and Leadership project, Closing the Gap – Test and Learn. He was also Director of the Oxford City Council funded Leadership for Learning project, working in city primary schools.

Ian is a founding editor of Review of Education, a journal of the British Educational Research Association, launched in 2013. He is series editor for Critical Guides for Teacher Educators, published by Critical Publishing. He is a founder member of two UK-wide research groups, TEG (Teacher Education Group) and CAPeR-UK (Curricululum, Assessment and Pedagogy Reform across the UK), as well as the OUDE –led research group on Poverty and Teacher Education. He was also a member of the steering group for the BERA-RSA Inquiry into Research and Teacher Education.

Ken Mayhew is Emeritus Professor of Education and Economic Performance and Emeritus Fellow of Pembroke College, Oxford.

He is an Extraordinary Professor at Maastricht University, a Director of the Centre for Tutorial Teaching and has recently finished a term as a member of the Department for Education’s Skills and Productivity Board. He was the founding Director of SKOPE, a multi-disciplinary centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, based in the Oxford Department of Education.
Ken is also currently a member of the ESRC’s College of Peer Reviewers; the Expert Group for CEDEFOP’s European Training and Learning Survey; the Expert Working Group for Cedefop’s Second European Skills and Jobs Survey; Bright Blue’s Commission on the Welfare System after the COVID 19 Pandemic. He is an editor of Oxford Economic Papers

Ken obtained a First in Modern History at Worcester College, Oxford and took a Masters in Economics at LSE. After graduate school he joined Her Majesty’s Treasury before moving to Oxford. In 1989 and 1990 he was Economic Director at the UK National Economic Development Office, and has worked as a consultant for many private and public sector organisations at home and abroad. In the UK these include the Department of Education and Skills, the Department of Trade and Industry, DEFRA, the Skills Funding Agency, the CIPD and the Confederation of British Industry. Abroad they include the EU, the Polish, Belgian and Omani Governments, SIK (Sweden) and Group Training Australia. He was on the Academic Advisory Board of the National Skills Taskforce and Chair of an expert group advising the OECD on the background questionnaire for PIAAC. His major research interests are in labour economics, human resource management and the economics of education and training. He has published widely in these areas.

Ken Mayhew would welcome informal contacts from prospective students interested in the following topics:

• The economics of education
• Transitions from the education system to the labour market
• Work-based training and learning
• Education and social mobility
• The labour market

Research

Ken’s current research is mainly in six areas: transitions from education into the labour market; the economics of work-based training; the economics of higher education; low paid work in the UK and Europe; the labour market as a social model; inequality with special emphasis on regional inequality.

Featured publications
  •  Oxford Handbook of Skills and Training, Oxford University Press, 2017 (with J. Buchanan, D. Finegold and C. Warhurst)
  • “Educating for a cooperative society –building human and social capital: the role of government” in G. Redding, A. Drew and S. Crump (eds), The Oxford Handbook of Higher Education Systems and University Management, 2019
  • “Inequality”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 2019 (with S. Wills)
  • Holmes, C, Mayhew, K (2016) “The economics of higher education”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 32(4) 475-496.
  • Mayhew, K, Holmes, C (2015) Over-qualification and skills mismatch in the graduate labour market. London: CIPD.
  • Mayhew, K (2015) “UK labour market policy then and now”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy.
  • “BREXIT and higher education” (2022) Oxford Review of Economic Policy
  • “What accounts for changes in the chances of being NEET in the UK?” (2021) Journal of Education and Work (with C. Holmes and E. Murphy)
  • Higher education and the labour market” (2020) Oxford Review of Education (with H. Lauder)
Books
  • Oxford Handbook of Skills and Training, Oxford University Press, paperback edition 2018 (with J. Buchanan, D. Finegold and C. Warhurst)
  • Oxford Handbook of Skills and Training, Oxford University Press, 2017 (with J. Buchanan, D. Finegold and C. Warhurst)
  • Appelbaum, E, Bosch, G, Gautié, J, Mason, G, Mayhew, K, Salverda, W, Schmitt, J, Westergaard-Nielsen, N (2010) Introduction and overview.
  • LLoyd, C, Mason, G, Mayhew, K (2008) Low-Wage Work in the United Kingdom. Russell Sage Foundation.
  • Grip, AD, Loo, JV, Mayhew, K (2002) The Economics of Skills Obsolescence Theoretical Innovations and Empirical Applications. Jai.
  • Mayhew, K, Fenn, P, McGuire, A (1994) Providing Health Care. Oxford: OUP.
  • Mayhew, K, Layard, R, Owen, G (1994) Britain’s Training Deficit. Avebury Publishing.
  • Bowen, A, Mayhew, K (1991) Reducing Regional Inequalities.
  • Fenn, P, McGuire, A, Mayhew, K (1991) Providing Health Care. Oxford: OUP.
  • Bowen, A, Mayhew, K (1990) Improving Incentives for the Low-Paid. Springer.
  • Mayhew, K (1983) Trade Unions and the Labour Market. Blackwell Pub.
  • Robinson, DJS, Mayhew, K (1983) Pay policies for the future.
Book chapters
  • “NEETS in England”, in M. Levels, C. Brzinsky-Fay, C. Holmes and J. Jongbloed (eds), The Dynamics of Marginalised Youth, Routledge, 2022 (with C. Holmes, L. Wright, E. Murphy, E. Keep and S. Maguire)
  • “Derek Robinson” in R. Cord (ed), The Palgrave Companion to Oxford Economics, Palgrave, 2021
  • “What, if anything, can we learn from Germany, Switzerland, Austria, the Netherlands and Denmark?”, in D. Goodhart (ed.), The Training We Need Now, Policy Exchange, 2020
  • “Educating for a cooperative society –building human and social capital: the role of government” in G. Redding, A. Drew and S. Crump (eds), The Oxford Handbook of Higher Education Systems and University Management, 2019
  • “The economic and social benefits of skills” in Oxford Handbook of Skills and Training, 2017 (with I Grugulis and C. Holmes)
  • “Skills and training: the landscape” in Oxford Handbook of Skills and Training, 2017 (with J. Buchanan, D. Finegold and C. Warhurst)
  • Mayhew, K, Wickham-Jones, M (2014) “The UK’s Social Model from New Deal to Economic Crisis”, In: J-E Dolvik, A Martin (eds.) European Social Models from Crisis to Crisis: Employment and Inequality in an Era of Monetary Integration.Oxford: OUP.
  • Holmes, C, Mayhew, K (2014) “The winners and losers in the ‘hourglass’ labour market”, In: Understanding Employer Engagement in Education: Theories and Evidence. 92-113
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.4324/9781315779966
  • Mayhew, K (2010) “Comment on Anderson and Ruhs”, In: B Anderson, M Ruhs (eds.) Who Needs Migrant Workers: Labour Shortages, Immigration and Public Policy.
  • Gautié, J, Westergaard-Nielsen, N, Schmitt, J, Mayhew, K (2010) “The impact of institutions on the supply side of the low-wage labor market”, In: Low-Wage Work in the Wealthy World. 147-182
  • Bosch, G, Mayhew, K, Gautié, J (2010) “Industrial relations, legal regulations, and wage setting”, In: Low-Wage Work in the Wealthy World. 91-146
  • Mayhew, K, Keep, E (2009) “Knowledge, skills and competitiveness”, In: F Rauner, R Maclean (eds.) Handbook of TVET Research.
  • Mayhew, K, Mason, G, Osborne, M, Stevens, P (2008) “Low pay, labour market institutions and job quality”, In: C Lloyd, G Mason, K Mayhew (eds.) Low Wage Work in the UK. New York: Russell Sage.
  • Mayhew, K, Mason, G (2008) “Low paid work in the UK: an overview”, In: C Lloyd, G Mason, K Mayhew (eds.) Low Wage Work in the UK. New York: Russell Sage.
  • Mayhew, K, Deer, C (2007) “The changing nature and context of higher education in the UK”, In: T Butler, M Dane (eds.) Reflections on Change.
  • Mayhew, K (2005) How to improve the human capital of older workers. Paris: OECD.
  • Mayhew, K, de Grip, A, van Loo, J (2002) “The economics of skills obsolescence”, In: A de Grip, J van Loo, K Mayhew (eds.) The Economics of Skills Obsolescence: Theoretical Innovations and Empirical Applications. Jai.
  • Mayhew, K (2002) “The high skills vision”, In: A Jolly (ed.) Skills and Training Directory. Kogan Page.
  • Mayhew, K (2002) “Higher education – size matters”, In: G Hayward, S James (eds.) Growing Higher Education: Expansion or Hyperinflation.
  • Mayhew, K, Holtham, G, Ingram, P (1998) “The long term unemployed – what more can be done?”, In:J McCormick, C Oppenheim (eds.) Welfare in Working Order. London: IPPR.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1998) “Vocational Education and Training and Economic Performance”, In: T Buxton, P Chapman, J Temple (eds.) Britain’s Economic Performance. 2nd edition. London: Routledge. 367-395
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1998) “Training and Development”, In: S Fox (ed.) The European business environment UK. London: Thomson Business Press. 219-241
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1996) “UK Training Policy – Assumptions and Reality”, In: A Booth, DJ Snower (eds.) Acquiring Skills Market Failures, Their Symptoms and Policy Responses. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 303-334
  • Mayhew, K, Ingram, P, Guest, D (1996) “How do we think about pay?”, In: H Murlis (ed.) Pay at the Crossroads. London: IPD.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1996) “Training for the Unemployed”, In: P Meadows (ed.) Work out – or Work in? Contributions to the debate on the future of work. York: Joseph Rowntree Foundation. 140-155
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1995) “The Economic Demand for Higher Education, and Investing in People – Two Aspects of Sustainable Development in British Higher Education”, In: F Coffield (ed.) Higher Education in a Learning Society. Durham: Durham University School of Education. 81-110
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1995) Training Policy for Competitiveness – Time for a Fresh Perspective? London: Policy Studies Institute. 110-145
  • Mayhew, K, Layard, R, Owen, G (1994) “Why we need a Training Reform Act”, In: K Mayhew, R Layard, G Owen (eds.) Britain’s Training Deficit. Avebury.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1994) “The Changing Structure of Training Provision”, In: T Buxton, P Chapman, P Temple (eds.) Britain’s Economic Performance. London: Routledge.
  • Mayhew, K, Anderton, R (1994) “A comparative analysis of the UK labour market”, In: R Barrell (ed.) The UK Labour Market: Comparative Aspects and Institutional Developments. Cambridge University Press.
  • Mayhew, K (1994) “Pay policies in the private sector: an international overview”, In: M Lavender (ed.) International Pay Policies. London: Public Finance Foundation.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1993) “Training and the Labour Market”, In: C Trinder, P Jackson (eds.) The Public Services Yearbook 1993. London: Chapman and Hall. 169-190
  • Mayhew, K (1992) “Incomes policy”, In: New Palgrave Dictionary of Money and Finance. Palgrave.
  • Mayhew, K (1991) “Pay policies in the private sector: an international overview”, In: J Hawkins (ed.) International Pay Policies. London: Public Finance Foundation.
  • Mayhew, K, McGuire, A, Fenn, P (1991) “The economics of health care”, In: K Mayhew, A McGuire, P Fenn (eds.) Providing Health Care. Oxford: OUP.
  • Mayhew, K, Bowen, A (1991) “Regional economic disparities: some public policy issues”, In: K Mayhew, A Bowen (eds.) Reducing Regional Inequalities.
  • Mayhew, K (1991) “Training: the way ahead”, In: Employment Institute (ed.) Improving Britain’s Industrial Performance. Employment Institute.
  • Mayhew, K (1991) “Regional issues in economics: setting the scene”, In: K Mayhew, A Bowen (eds.) Reducing Regional Inequalities.
  • Keep, EJ (1990) “Training for the Low Paid”, In: A Bowen, K Mayhew (eds.) Improving Incentives for the Low-Paid. London: Macmillan/NEDO. 139-180
  • Mayhew, K, Ray, A (1990) “White collar pay and employment”, In: M Gregory, A Thompson (eds.) A Portrait of Pay. OUP.
  • Mayhew, K, Bowen, A (1990) “Incentives for the low paid: issues for public policy”, In: K Mayhew, A Bowen (eds.) Improving Incentives for the Low Paid.
  • Mayhew, K, Bowen, A, Brewer, D (1990) “Incentives for the low paid: setting the scene”, In: K Mayhew, A Bowen (eds.) Improving Incentives for the Low Paid.
  • Mayhew, K, Turnbull, P (1989) “Models of union behaviour”, In: R Perlman, R Drago (eds.) Microeconomic Issues in the Labour Market. Harvester.
  • Mayhew, K (1986) “Economists and immigration”, In: A Dummett (ed.) Towards a Just Immigration Policy.
  • Mayhew, K (1986) “Employee behaviour”, In: D Morris (ed.) The Economic System in the UK. OUP.
  • Mayhew, K, Addison, J (1983) “Discrimination in the labour market”, In: G Bain (ed.) Industrial relations in Britain. Blackwell.
  • Mayhew, K (1983) “Traditional incomes policies”, In: D Robinson, K Mayhew (eds.) Pay Policies for the Future.
  • Mayhew, K, Greenhalgh, C (1981) “Labour supply in Great Britain: theory and evidence”, In: Z Hornstein, J Grice (eds.) The Economics of the Labour Market. HMSO.
  • Mayhew, K (1981) “Incomes policy and the private sector”, In: R Elliott, L Fallick (eds.) Incomes Policy, Inflation and Relative Pay. George Allen and Unwin.
  • Mayhew, K (1981) “The institutional context of incomes policy”, In: R Chater, A Dean, R Elliott (eds.) Incomes Policies. OUP.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K “Education and Training”, In: C Trinder, P Jackson (eds.) Public Services Yearbook 1994. London: Chapman and Hall. 237-254
Conference papers
Journal articles
  • “BREXIT and UK higher education”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 2022
  • “Kurzarbeit/short time working: experiences and lessons from the COVID-induced downturn”, National Institute Economic Review, 2022 (with B. Casey)
  • “What accounts for changes in the chances of being NEET in the UK?”, Journal of Education and Work, 2021 (with C. Holmes and E. Murphy)
  • “Regional inequalities: causes and cures”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 2021 (with F. Corvers)
  • “COVID 19 and the labour market”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 2020 (with P. Anand)
  • “Higher education and the labour market”, Oxford Review of Education, 2020 (with H. Lauder)
  • Inequality”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 2019 (with S. Wills)
  • Mayhew, K (2017) “UK higher education and Brexit”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 33(1) S155-S161.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grx012
  • Mayhew, K (2016) “Human Capital, Growth and Inequality”, Welsh Economic Review. 24(0) 23-23.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.18573/j.2016.10052
  • Holmes, C, Mayhew, K (2016) “The economics of higher education”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 32(4) 475-496.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grw031
  • Mayhew, K (2015) “Derek Robinson (9 February 1932-1 September 2014)”, ECONOMIC AND LABOUR RELATIONS REVIEW.26(3) 490-492.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/1035304615597839
  • Laczik, A, Mayhew, K (2015) “Labour market developments and their significance for VET in England: Current concerns and debates”, Research in Comparative and International Education. 10(4) 558-575.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/1745499915615974
  • Mayhew, K (2015) “UK labour market policy then and now”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 31(2) 199-216.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grv017
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K (2014) “Inequality – ‘wicked problems’, labour market outcomes and the search for silver bullets”, OXFORD REVIEW OF EDUCATION. 40(6) 764-781.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/03054985.2014.979580
  • Mayhew, K (2013) “Government and business: an introduction”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 29(2) 249-260.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grt028
  • Cobham, D, Adam, C, Mayhew, K (2013) “The economic record of the 1997-2010 Labour government: an assessment”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 29(1) 1-24.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grt014
  • Amable, B, Mayhew, K (2011) “Unemployment in the OECD”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 27(2) 207-220.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grr019
  • Lloyd, C, Mayhew, K (2010) “Skill: the solution to low wage work?”, Industrial Relations Journal. 41(5) 429-445.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2338.2010.00578.x
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K (2010) “Moving beyond skills as a social and economic panacea”, WORK EMPLOYMENT AND SOCIETY. 24(3) 565-577.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0950017010371663
  • Salverda, W, Mayhew, K (2009) “Capitalist economies and wage inequality”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 25(1) 126-154.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grp008
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K, Payne, J (2006) “From skills revolution to productivity miracle – Not as easy as it sounds?”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 22(4) 539-559.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grj032
  • Mayhew, K, Neely, A (2006) “Improving productivity – Opening the black box”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 22(4) 445-456.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grj026
  • Mayhew, K, Deer, C, Dua, M (2004) “The move to mass higher education in the UK: many questions and some answers”, OXFORD REVIEW OF EDUCATION. 30(1) 65-82.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/0305498042000190069
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K (2004) “The economic and distributional implications of current policies on higher education”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 20(2) 298-314.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grh017
  • Gold, M, Charlwood, A, Müller-Camen, M, Lucas, R, Crowley, S, Heery, E, Benson, J, Mayhew, K, Bach, S, Moore, S, Finkin, M, Rowlinson, M, Beauregard, A (2002) “Book Reviews”, British Journal of Industrial Relations. 40 341-368.
  • Mayhew, K (2002) “The state of working Britain”, BRITISH JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS. 40(2) 355-357.
    Borghans, L, Green, F, Mayhew, K (2001) “Skills measurement and economic analysis: An introduction”, OXFORD ECONOMIC PAPERS-NEW SERIES. 53(3) 375-384.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oep/53.3.375
  • Mayhew, K (2000) “The assessment: Labour markets and welfare”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 16(1) 1-12.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/16.1.1
  • Felstead, A, Green, F, Pack, A, Mayhew, K (2000) “The Impact of Training on Labour”, British Journal of Industrial Relations. 38(2)
  • Green, F, Felstead, A, Mayhew, K, Pack, A (2000) “The impact of training on labour mobility: Individual and firm-level evidence from Britain”, BRITISH JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS. 38(2) 261-275.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/1467-8543.00162
  • Felstead, A, Green, F, Mayhew, K (1999) “Britain’s training statistics: A cautionary tale”, WORK EMPLOYMENT AND SOCIETY. 13(1) 107-115.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1017/S0950017099000070
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K (1999) “The assessment: Knowledge, skills, and competitiveness”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 15(1) 1-15.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/15.1.1
  • Mayhem, K (1997) “The Education and Training Mismatch”, Business Strategy Review. 8(2) 51-53.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/1467-8616.00022
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K (1996) “Towards a learning society — Definition and measurement”, Policy Studies. 17(3) 215-232.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/01442879608423708
  • Keep, E, Mayhew, K (1996) “Economic Demand for Higher Education? A Sound Foundation for Further Expansion?”, Higher Education Quarterly. 50(2) 89-109.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2273.1996.tb01693.x
  • MAYHEW, K, SEABRIGHT, P (1992) “INCENTIVES AND THE MANAGEMENT OF ENTERPRISES IN ECONOMIC TRANSITION: CAPITAL MARKETS ARE NOT ENOUGH”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy. 8(1) 105-129.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/8.1.105
  • HELM, D, MAYER, C, MAYHEW, K (1991) “THE ASSESSMENT – MICROECONOMIC POLICY IN THE 1980S”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 7(3) 1-12.
  • MAYHEW, K (1991) “THE ECONOMICS OF HUMAN – RESOURCE MANAGEMENT – MITCHELL, DJB, ZAIDI, MA”, BRITISH JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS. 29(3) 534-535.
  • MAYHEW, K (1991) “THE ASSESSMENT – THE UK LABOR-MARKET IN THE 1980S”, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY. 7(1) 1-17.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/7.1.1
  • McGUIRE, A, FENN, P, MAYHEW, K (1989) “THE ASSESSMENT: THE ECONOMICS OF HEALTH CARE”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy. 5(1) 1-20.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/5.1.1
  • KEEP, E, MAYHEW, E (1988) “THE ASSESSMENT: EDUCATION, TRAINING AND ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy. 4(3) 1-1.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/4.3.1-a
  • KNIGHT, JB, MAYHEW, K (1987) “WAGE DETERMINATION AND LABOR-MARKET INFLEXIBILITY – INTRODUCTION”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 49(1) 1-8.
  • MAYHEW, K (1986) “WAGE RESTRAINT BY CONSENSUS – BRITAIN SEARCH FOR AN INCOMES-POLICY AGREEMENT 1965-79 – FISHBEIN, WH”, JOURNAL OF ECONOMIC LITERATURE. 24(2) 694-695.
  • Mayhew, K (1985) “Reforming the labour market”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy. 1(2) 60-79.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/1.2.60
  • MAYHEW, K (1985) “ECONOMICS OF UNEMPLOYMENT – AN HISTORICAL-PERSPECTIVE – CASSON, M”, INDUSTRIAL & LABOR RELATIONS REVIEW. 38(4) 667-668.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.2307/2524010
  • ROBINSON, D, MAYHEW, K (1983) “SPECIAL ISSUE – PAY POLICIES FOR THE FUTURE – INTRODUCTION”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 45(1) 3-13.
  • MAYHEW, K (1983) “FAIRNESS, COLLECTIVE-BARGAINING, AND INCOMES-POLICY – WILLMAN, P”, MANCHESTER SCHOOL OF ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL STUDIES. 51(1) 105-106.
  • MAYHEW, K (1983) “TRADITIONAL INCOMES POLICIES”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 45(1) 15-32.
    ROBINSON, D, MAYHEW, K (1983) “SPECIAL ISSUE – PAY POLICIES FOR THE FUTURE – CONCLUSIONS”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 45(1) 127-139.
  • MAYHEW, K, ROSEWELL, B (1981) “OCCUPATIONAL-MOBILITY IN BRITAIN”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 43(3) 225-255.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1981.mp43003001.x
  • MAYHEW, K, ROSEWELL, B (1979) “LABOR-MARKET SEGMENTATION IN BRITAIN”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 41(2) 81-115.
  • MAYHEW, K (1979) “ECONOMISTS AND STRIKES”,OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 41(1) 1-19.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1979.mp41001001.x
  • MAYHEW, K, ROSEWELL, B (1978) “IMMIGRANTS AND OCCUPATIONAL CROWDING IN GREAT-BRITAIN”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 40(3) 223-248.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1978.mp40003003.x
  • MAYHEW, K (1977) “DEGREE OF UNIONIZATION 1948-68 – COMMENT”, BULLETIN OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH. 29(1) 51-53.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8586.1977.tb00409.x
  • MAYHEW, K (1977) “EARNINGS DISPERSION IN LOCAL LABOR-MARKETS – IMPLICATIONS FOR SEARCH BEHAVIOR”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 39(2) 93-107.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1977.mp39002001.x
  • MAYHEW, K (1976) “REGIONAL VARIATIONS OF MANUAL EARNINGS IN ENGINEERING”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 38(1) 11-25.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1976.mp38001002.x
  • MAYHEW, K (1976) “PLANT SIZE AND EARNINGS OF MANUAL WORKERS IN ENGINEERING”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 38(3) 149-160.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1976.mp38003001.x
  • MAYHEW, K (1975) “REVERSAL OF SKILL DIFFERENTIALS UNDER PAYMENT BY RESULTS SYSTEMS CASE OF ENGINEERING”, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS. 37(4) 251-267.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.1975.mp37004001.x
  • Mayhew, K “The resurgence of incomes policy”, Manpower Policy and Practice.
  • Mayhew, K, Rijkers, B “Improving the human capital of older workers”, Ageing Horizons.
  • Mayhew, K, Felstead, A, Green, F “Interpreting training statistics in Europe: issuing a health warning”, European Journal for Vocational Training.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K “Towards the knowledge-driven economy”, 7(4) 50-59.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K “Was Ratner Right? Product Market and Competitive Strategies and Their Links with Skills and Knowledge”, EPI Economic Report. 12(3) 1-14.
  • Mayhew, K “The Assessment: Labour Markets and Welfare”, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Vol. 16.(1)
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/16.1.1
Reports
  • Alternative Pathways into the Labour Market, CIPD, 2016 (with Craig Holmes)
  • Wilde, S, James, SF, Mayhew, K (2015) Training Managers: Benefits from and barriers to WorldSkills UK participation. Oxford: Oxford University Consulting.
  • Mayhew, K, Holmes, C (2015) Over-qualification and skills mismatch in the graduate labour market. London: CIPD.
  • James Relly, SF, Holmes, C, Mayhew, K (2015) Learning environments to develop vocational excellence. http://vocationalexcellence.education.ox.ac.uk/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/Project-2-Phase-2-Final-Report-Learning-environments-to-develop-vocational-excellence.pdf:
  • Chankseliani, M, James Relly, S, Mayhew, K (2015) WorldSkills competitors and entrepreneurship: A Report to the Skills Funding Agency.
  • Chankseliani, M, James Relly, Susan, Mayhew, Ken (2015) “Benefits of Developing Vocational Excellence. A Report to the National Apprenticeship Service of Project 3 (Phase II) of the DUVE suite of projects”, In: Benefits of Developing Vocational Excellence. A Report to the National Apprenticeship Service of Project 3 (Phase II) of the DUVE suite of projects.
  • James Relly, SF, Allen, J, Mayhew, K (2015) Further education college participation in worldSkills and other competitions. http://vocationalexcellence.education.ox.ac.uk/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/Project-4-Further-education-college-participation-in-WorldSkills-and-other-skills-competitions.pdf:
  • James Relly, SF, Rodriguez Leal, T, Mayhew, K (2014) Interim Evaluation Report on the Skills Competition CPD Programme. Oxford: Oxford University Consulting.
  • James Relly, SF, Rodriguez Leal, T, Mayhew, K (2014) Final Evaluation Report on the Skills Competition CPD Programme. Oxford: Oxford University Consulting.
  • James, SF, Mayhew, K, Laczik, A, Mordarska, M (2013) Report on Apprenticeships, Employer Engagement and Vocational Formation in England. Oxford: Oxford University Consulting.
  • James, SF, Mayhew, K, Chankseliani, M, Laczik, A (2013) “Benefits of Developing Vocational Excellence. A Report to the National Apprenticeship Service. Oxford: SKOPE”, In: Benefits of Developing Vocational Excellence A Report to the National Apprenticeship Service of Project 3 of the DUVE suite of projects.
  • James, S, Holmes, C, Mayhew, K (2013) “Learning Environments to Develop vocational Excellence. Oxford: SKOPE”, In: A Report to the National Apprenticeship Service of Project 2 of the DUVE suite of projects. Oxford: SKOPE.
  • Mayhew, K, Holmes, C (2012) Is the UK labour market polarising. London: Resolution Foundation.
  • Holmes, C, Mayhew, K, Keep, EJ (2012) “Ten Big Questions for Higher Education”, In: SKOPE Issues Paper. Cardiff: Cardiff University, SKOPE.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (2011) “Future Directions for Skills Policy”, In: SKOPE submission to the Labour Party Policy Review on skills (mimeo). Universities of Oxford and Cardiff, SKOPE.
  • Mayhew, K, Green, F, Stasz, C (2005) Defining a strategy for the direct assessment of adult skills. Copenhagen:Danish Technological Institute.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (2004) Can Employers Be Persuaded That Training Pays? Glasgow: Future Skills Scotland/ScottishEnterprise.
  • Mayhew, K, Wilson, R, Hogarth, T, Keep, E (2003) Tackling the low skills equilibrium. London: Department of Trade and Industry.
  • Mayhew, K, Green, F, Molloy, E (2003) Employer Perspectives on Skill. London: Department for Education and Skills.
  • Mayhew, K, Keep, E, Bosworth, D (2003) Tackling the low skills equilibrium: a review of the issues. Department of Trade and Industry.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K, Corney, M (2002) Review of the evidence on the rate of return to employers of investment in training and employer training measures. Department of Trade and Industry.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (2001) “Globalisation, Models of Competitive Advantage and Skills”, In: SKOPE Research Paper. Coventry: University of Warwick, SKOPE.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (2000) “The Leisure Sector”, In: National Skills Task Force Research Project Report. Sheffield: DfEE.
  • Mayhew, K, Felstead, A, Green, F (1997) Getting the measure of training. Leeds: Centre for Industrial Policy and Performance, Leeds University.
  • Mayhew, K, Holtham, G (1996) Tackling long term unemployment. London: Institute for Public Policy Research.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1994) “UK Training Policy – Assumptions and Reality”, In: Background briefing paper for TUC national conference ‘Looking Forward to Full Employment’. London: TUC.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1994) Scoping paper for the Institute of Personnel Management ‘What Makes Training Pay?’ Project. London: IPM.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1993) Submission on training and skills utilisation to the House of Commons Select Committee on Trade and Industry’s inquiry into the competitiveness of British manufacturing’, June, 1993. (subsequently published in Evidence to the House of Commons Select Committee on Trade and Industry, Trade and Industry Committee 2nd Report ‘Competitiveness of UK Manufacturing Industry’, Vol 2, Memoranda of Evidence. London: HMSO.
  • Layard, R, Mayhew, K, Owen, G (1993) The Training Reform Act of 1994.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1108/01437729310033296
  • Mayhew, K, St John, B (1989) Subcontracting in Britain. London: Confederation of British Industry.
  • Mayhew, K, Rosewell, B (1981) Manpower problems and changes in the labour market. Bradford: MCB Publications.
  • Mayhew, K, Rosewell, B (1980) Employment and Unemployment Issues in the 1970s.
    DOI: http://doi.org/10.1108/eb001235
  • Mayhew, K, Lall, S (1973) The income and balance of payments effects of private foreign investment in manufacturing: case studies of Colombia and Malaysia. UNCTAD.
Other
  • “BREXIT and UK higher education”, Realites Industrielles, Feb 2021
  • Skills and Skills Mismatch in Food and Drink Manufacturing, a Report for DEFRA, 2020 (with Craig Holmes)
  • “Career choice and a policy dilemma”, CEDEFOP’S Skill Set and Match, November 2018
  • Oman: National Workforce Planning, SKOPE, 2016
  • Mayhew, K (2015) “Derek Robinson”, Royal Economic Society Newsletter.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1999) “Demand and supply”, People Management. 40-42.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1998) “Was Ratner Right”, T-Magazine. 15-17.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1998) “Welfare to Work – some questions ministers must answer”, Parliamentary Brief. 5(3) 18-19.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1996) “What Training Can and Cannot Do for the Jobless”, Parliamentary Brief. 4(4) 43-46.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1994) “Skilling the Jobless: Time for a New Deal”, Employment Policy Institute Economic Report. 8(1) 1-5.
  • Keep, EJ, Mayhew, K (1994) “Skills Cannot Promise a Job”, Parliamentary Brief .3(2) 17-20.

Herb completed a BA (Hons) Psychology at Indiana University in 1968. After that, he achieved an MA at Indiana before moving to UCLA to complete a DPhil in Psychology in 1974.

Shortly after, he was appointed Head of Evaluation Research Services at University of Southern California for 5 years, before moving to Sydney, Australia in 1980 to take a position as Lecturer, and then Senior Lecturer, at Sydney University.

At the same time, he was a Reader in Education. He held these posts until 1990, when he joined the University of Western Sydney. Over the next 15 years at that institution, he served a number of roles, including Research Professor of Education, Professor of Psychology, Dean of Graduate Research Studies, Pro-Vice Chancellor of Research, and Director of Self-concept Enhancement and Learning Facilitation (SELF) Research Centre. Indeed, in 1997 he founded the SELF Research Centre, which now has over 450 members, including many of the top self-concept researchers in the world, and satellite centres at leading Universities in Australia, Europe, North America, and Asia (see http://self.uws.edu.au/). He served as Director of SELF until he departed at the start of 2006 to become a Professor at the University of Oxford.

Herb has supervised scores of Honours-level and Doctoral candidates. Some of his recent PhD supervisions have been in the areas of self-concept theory and intervention, motivation, scale development, bullying, mental toughness in elite athletes, the peer review process, and eating disorders, among others. They generally employ complex quantitative research techniques

Research

Herb Marsh is widely published with 350 articles in more than 70 different journals, 60 chapters, 14 monographs, and 350 conference papers; and co-edits the International Advances in Self Research monograph series. In the most important journals in his disciplines over the last quarter century he is the most frequently published author in American Educational Research Journal (29 articles) and the Journal of Sport & Exercise Psych (21 articles), and second most frequently published author in Journal of Educational Psychology (61 articles). He has a total of 276 journal articles listed in ISI that have been cited a total of more than 11,00 times – including 55 articles with at least 55 citations (ISI H index = 55) and one article with more than 1,100 citations.

He has been recognized as the most productive educational psychologist in the world, as one of the top 10 international researchers in Higher Education and in Social Psychology, and the 11th most productive researcher in the world across all disciplines of psychology. He is a highly cited researcher on ISI’s list of the “world’s most cited and influential scientific authors over a sustained period according to a common standard that covers all countries and all scientific disciplines” (http://isihighlycited.com/), one of only a few UK social science researchers to achieve this recognition and one of the few anywhere to achieve this distinction in two different categories (general social sciences and psychology/psychiatry; presently there is no classification for education).

He has reviewed articles for more than 75 journals and has been on the editorial boards of 14 international journals (J. Ed Psych; Am Ed Res J; Child Devel; Perspectives on Psych Sci; J Pers & Soc Psych; Structural Equation Modelling; Inter J of Sport Psych; Ed & Psych Measurement; J Exp Educ; Educ Res and Eval; J Sport & Exercise Psych; Int J of Sport & Exercise Psych; J of Contemporary Ed Psych; Organizational Res Methods; Multivariate Behavioral Res).

He has served on external advisory committees for the: Scientific Advisory Board of the German Max Planck Institute (Education and Human Development, Berlin); Hong Kong Institute of Educational Research, Chinese University of Hong Kong; Social Sciences and Humanities for the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zürich (Zürich ETH); and the International Research School “The Life Course: Evolutionary and Ontogenetic Dynamics” co-organised by the Univ of Michigan (USA), Univ of Virginia (USA), Humboldt University (Germany), Free University (Germany) and the Max Planck Institute.

Professor Marsh’s research has consistently attracted external funding, including a 100% success record on 24 proposals to the highly competitive Australian Research Council during the last 25 years as well as more recent United Kingdom grants from the Economic and Social Research Council, Higher Education Funding Council for England, and Higher Education Authority.

Other international awards include a Career Achievement Award from the American Educational Research Association, the prestigious Wen Lin Visiting Professorship from The Chinese University of Hong Kong, a visiting travelling fellowship from the British Psychological Society, Fellow of the Australian Academy of Social Sciences and the Society of Multivariate Experimental Psychology, and many keynote presentations at international conferences including the presidential invited keynote addresses for 2007 meetings of both the British Educational Research Association and the American Educational Research Association. In 2008 Professor Marsh was awarded the ESRC Professorial Fellowship which provides professorial salary, support staff and infrastructure for an extended research programme, a highly competitive fellowship awarded to only 3-5 social science researchers across all of the UK.

Major research/scholarly interests

Self-concept and Motivational constructs: Theory, Measurement, Research, Enhancement; Teaching Effectiveness and Its Evaluation: Theory, measurement, research, and enhancement; Higher Education with a particular emphasis on students’ evaluation of teaching and relations between teaching and research; Developmental Psychology; Quantitative analysis, particularly confirmatory factor analysis, structural equation modelling, multilevel modelling; Sports psychology with a particular focus on physical self-concept and motivation; health psychology with a focus on motivational aspects of health related physical activity, physical fitness, and eating disorders; The peer review process in relation to both journals and research grants; Peer support and anti-bullying interventions.

Recent publications (2008 and in press)
Journal articles
  • Cowin, L.S. Johnson, M., Craven, R.G., & Marsh, H.W. (2008) Causal modeling of self-concept, job satisfaction, and retention of nurses International Journal Of Nursing Studies 45, 1449-1459
  • Craven, R. & Marsh, H. W. (2008). The centrality of the self-concept construct for psychological wellbeing and unlocking human potential: Implications for child and educational psychologists Educational & Child Psychology 25, 104-118.
  • Guay, F., Marsh, H. W., Senécal, C. , Dowson, M. (2008). Representations of relatedness with parents and friends and autonomous academic motivation during the late adolescence-early adulthood period: Reciprocal or unidirectional effects? British Journal of Educational Psychology, 78, 621–637
  • Ginns, P., Marsh, H. W., Behnia, M., Cheng, J. H. & Scalas, F. (in press). Using postgraduate students’ evaluations of research experience to benchmark departments and faculties: Issues and challenges British Journal of Educational Psychology
  • Fernet, C., Senécal, C., Guay, F., Marsh, H., & Dowson, M. (2008). The Work Tasks Motivation Scale for Teachers (WTMST) Journal of Career Assessment 16(2), 256-279.
  • Lüdtke, O., Marsh, H. W., Robitzsch, A., Trautwein, U., Asparouhov, T., & Muthén, B. (2008). The multilevel latent covariate model: A new, more reliable approach to group-level effects in contextual studies Psychological Methods 13, 203-229.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2008). The elusive importance effect: More failure for the Jamesian perspective on the importance of importance in shaping self-esteem Journal of Personality 76, 1081-1121.
  • Marsh, H. W., Jayasinghe, U. W., & Bond, N. W. (2008). Improving the peer-review process for grant applications: Reliability, validity and generalization American Psychologist 63, 160-168.
  • Marsh; H., Ludtke, O., Robitzsch, A., Trautwein, U. Latent (in press). Profile Analysis of Academic Self-concept Dimensions: Synergy of Person- and Variable-centered Approaches to the Internal/External Frame of Reference Models Structural Equation Modeling
  • Marsh, H. W., Martin, A. J., & Cheng, J. H. S. (2008). A multilevel perspective on gender in classroom motivation and climate: Potential benefits of male teachers for boys? Journal of Educational Psychology 100, 78-95.
  • Marsh, H. W., & O’Mara, A. (2008). Reciprocal effects between academic self-concept, self-esteem, achievement and attainment over seven adolescent years: Unidimensional and multidimensional perspectives of self-concept  Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin 34, 542-552.
  • Marsh, H. W., O’Mara, A. J. & Malmberg, L. (2008). Meta-Analysis: A three-level multilevel meta-anlaysis.
  • Marsh, H. W., Seaton, M., Trautwein, U., Lüdtke, O., Hau, K. T., O’Mara, A. J., & Craven, R. G. (2008). The big-fish-little-pond-effect stands up to critical scrutiny: Implications for theory, methodology, and future research Educational Psychology Review 20, 319-350.
  • Marsh, H. W., Trautwein, U., Ludtke, O. & Köller, O. (2008). Social comparison and big-fish-little-pond effects on self-concept and other self-belief constructs: Role of generalized and specific others Journal of Educational Psychology 100, 510-524.
  • Martin, A. J., & Marsh, H. W. (2008). Academic buoyancy: Towards an understanding of students’ everyday academic resilience Journal of School Psychology 46, 53-83.
  • Martin, A.J., & Marsh, H.W. (in press). Academic resilience and academic buoyancy: an encompassing multidimensional and hierarchical framing of concepts, causes, correlates, and cognate constructs Oxford Review of Education.
  • Martin, A.J., & Marsh, H.W. (2008). Workplace and academic buoyancy: Psychometric assessment and construct validity amongst school personnel and students Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment 26, 168-184.
  • Martin, A.J., Marsh, H.W., Debus, R. L. & Malmberg L. E. (2008). Performance and mastery orientation of high school and university/college students – A Rasch perspective Educational And Psychological Measurement 68, 464-487.
  • Scalas, L. F. & Marsh, H. W. (in press). The Role of Actual-Ideal Discrepancy in Explaining the Relation Between Physical Appearance and Self-Concept: A Stronger Methodological Approach European Journal of Personality.
  • Seaton, M., Marsh; H., & Craven, R. G. (in press). Earning Its Place as a Pan-Human Theory: Universality of the Big-Fish-Little-Pond Effect (BFLPE) Across 41 Culturally and Economically Diverse Countries Journal of Educational Psycholoygy.
  • Seaton, M., Marsh; H. W., Dumas; F., Huguet, P., Monteil, J. M, Regner, I., Blanton, H., Buunk, A. P., Gibbons, F. X. Kuyper, H., Suls, J. & Wheeler, L. (2008). In search of the big fish: Investigating the coexistance of the big-fish-little-pond effect with the positive effects of upward comparison British Journal of Social Psychology 47, 73-103.
  • Wen, Z., Marsh, H.W.,  Kit-Tai, H. & (in press). Structural Equation Models of Latent Interactions: An Appropriate Standardized Solution and Its Scale-free Properties Structural Equation Modeling
Edited books and chapters
  • Marsh, H. W., Craven, R. G., & McInerney, D. (Eds.). (2008). Self-Processes, Learning, and Enabling Human Potential: Dynamic New Approaches. International Advances in Self Research. Volume 3. Information Age Press: Greenwich, CT.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2007). Application of confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling in sport and exercise psychology. In G. Tenenbaum & R. C. Eklund. (Eds), Handbook of sport psychology (3rd Ed.). (pp. 774-798). Hoboken, NJ, US: John Wiley & Sons Inc.
  • Marsh, H. W. (In press). A multidimensional, hierarchical model of self-concept: An important facet of personality. In G. J. Boyle (ed.). Handbook of Personality. Sage: London.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2007). Physical Self-Concept and Sport. In S. Jowette & D. Lavallee, David (Eds), Social Psychology in Sport. (pp. 159-179). Champaign, IL, US: Human Kinetics.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2007). Students’ evaluations of university teaching: A multidimensional perspective. In R. P. Perry & J C. Smart (Eds.), The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: An Evidence-Based Perspective (pp.319-384).  New York: Springer.
  • Marsh, H.W., Cheng, J.,  Middleton, C. J. (in press). The Physical Self: Exploring Measurement and Constructs Surrounding Physical Self-Concept
  • Marsh, H.W., Martin, A. J. & Cheng, J. (2008). How we judge ourselves from different perspectives: Contextual influences on self-concept formation. In M. L. Maehr, S. Karabenick & T. Urdan (Eds.). Advances in Motivation and Achievement (Volume 15). New York: Elsevier.
  • Marsh, H.W., & O’Mara, A. J. (2008). Self-concept is as multidisciplinary as it is multidimensional: A review of theory, measurement, and practice in self-concept research. In H. W. Marsh, R. G. Craven, & D. M. McInerney (Eds.). Self-Processes, Learning, and Enabling Human Potential: Dynamic New Approaches. (Volume 3, pp. 87-118). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing
  • Marsh, H.W., & Retali, K. (in press). Academic self-concept. K. Littleton, C. Wood, J. K. Staarman (Eds.). Elsevier Handbook of Educational Psychology: New Perspectives on Learning and Teaching. New York: Elsevier
  • Marsh, H.W., Scalas L.F. (in press). Self-concept and learning: Reciprocal effects model between academic self-concept and academic achievement. To appear in B. McGaw, E. Baker, P. P. Peterson (Eds.) International Encyclopedia of Education, 3rd edition. Elsevier.
  • McInerney, D. M., Marsh, H.W., & Craven, R. G., & (2008). Self-Processes, Learning, and Enabling Human Potential. In H. W. Marsh, R. G. Craven, & D. M. McInerney (Eds.). Self-Processes, Learning, and Enabling Human Potential: Dynamic New Approaches. (Volume 3, pp. 3-12). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.
  • Parada, R., Craven, R. G., & Marsh, H.W. (2008). The beyond bullying secondary program: An innovative program empowering teachers to counteract bullying in schools. Self-Processes, Learning, and Enabling Human Potential: Dynamic New Approaches. (Volume 3, pp. 373-426). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.
  • Seaton, M., Craven, R. G., &  Marsh, H.W. (2008). East Meets West: Investigating the Generalizability of the Big-Fish-Little-Pond Effect in Western and Non-Western Countries. In H. W. Marsh, R. G. Craven, & D. M. McInerney (Eds.). Self-Processes, Learning, and Enabling Human Potential: Dynamic New Approaches. (Volume 3, pp. 353-372). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.
Most important publications (prior to 2008)
  • Marsh, H. W. (2007). Students’ evaluations of university teaching: A multidimensional perspective. In R. P. Perry & J C. Smart (Ed.), The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: An Evidence-Based Perspective (pp.319-384).  New York: Springer.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2007).Self-concept theory, measurement and research into practice: The role of self-concept in educational psychology. Leicester, UK: British Psychological Society.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2007). Application of confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling in sport/exercise psychology. In G. Tenenbaum & R. C. Eklund (Eds.), Handbook of on sport psychology (3rd ed., pp. 774 – 798). New York: Wiley.
  • Marsh, H. W., & Hau, K-T. (2007). Applications of latent-variable models in educational psychology: The need for methodological-substantive synergies. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 32, 151-171.
  • Marsh, H. W., Hau, K-T., Artelt, C., Baumert, J., Peschar, J. L. (2006). OECD’s brief self-report measure of educational psychology’s most useful affective constructs: Cross-cultural, psychometric comparisons across 25 countries. International Journal of Testing. 6, 311–360.  (special issue of journal).
  • Marsh, H. W. & Craven, R. G. (2006). Reciprocal effects of self-concept and performance from a multidimensional perspective: Beyond seductive pleasure and unidimensional perspectives. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 1, 133-163.
  • Marsh, H. W., Martin, A. J., & Hau, K-T. (2006). A Multiple Method Perspective on Self-concept Research in Educational Psychology: A Construct Validity Approach. In M. Eid & E. Diener (Eds.), Handbook of Multimethod Measurement in Psychology (pp. 441-456). American Psychological Association: Washington DC.
  • Marsh, H.W., Papaioannou, A., Theodorakis, Y. (2006). Causal ordering of physical self-concept and exercise behavior: Reciprocal effects model and the influence of physical education teachers. Health Psychology, 25 (3): 316-328
  • Marsh, H. W., Trautwein, U., Lüdtke, O., Köller, O. & Baumert, J. (2006) Integration of multidimensional self-concept and core personality constructs: Construct validation and relations to well-being and achievement. Journal of Personality, 74, 403-455.
  • Marsh, H. W., Ellis, L., Parada, L., Richards, G. & Heubeck, B. G. (2005). A short version of the Self Description Questionnaire II: Operationalizing criteria for short-form evaluation with new applications of confirmatory factor analyses. Psychological Assessment, 17, 81-102.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2005). Big fish little pond effect on academic self-concept. German Journal of Educational Psychology, 19, 119-128.
  • Marsh, H. W. & Kleitman, S. (2005). Consequences of employment during high school: Character building, subversion of academic goals, or a threshold. American Educational Research Journal, 42, 331-369.
  • Marsh, H. W., Debus, R. & Bornholt, L. (2005). Validating Young Children’s Self-concept Responses: Methodological Ways and means to understand their responses. In D. M. Teti (Ed.), Handbook of Research Methods in Developmental Science (pp. 138-160). Blackwell Publishers: Oxford, UK.
  • Marsh, H. W., Hau, K-T & Grayson, D. (2005). Goodness of Fit Evaluation in Structural Equation Modeling. In A. Maydeu-Olivares & J. McArdle (Eds.), Contemporary Psychometrics. A Festschrift for Roderick P. McDonald (pp. 275-340). Mahwah NJ: Erlbaum.
  • Marsh, H. W., & Perry, C. (2005). Does a positive self-concept contribute to winning gold medals in elite swimming? The causal ordering of elite athlete self-concept and championship performances. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 27, 71-91.
  • Marsh, H. W., Trautwein, U., Lüdtke, O., Köller, O. & Baumert, J. (2005) Academic self-concept, interest, grades and standardized test scores: Reciprocal effects models of causal ordering. Child Development, 76, 297-416.
  • Marsh, H. W. & Hau, K. T. (2004). Explaining paradoxical relations between academic self-concepts and achievements: Cross-cultural generalizability of the internal-external frame of reference predictions across 26 countries. Journal of Educational Psychology, 96,  56-67
  • Marsh, H.W., Hau, K.T. & Wen, Z., (2004).  In search of golden rules: Comment on hypothesis testing approaches to setting cutoff values for fit indexes and dangers in overgeneralising Hu & Bentler’s (1999) findings. Structural Equation Modelling, 11, 320-341.
  • Marsh, H. W.; Wen, Z.; Hau, K. (2004). Structural equation models of latent interactions: Evaluation of alternative estimation strategies and indicator construction. Psychological Methods, 9, 275-300.
  • Marsh, H. W. & Hau, K. T. (2003). Big fish little pond effect on academic self-concept: A crosscultural (26 country) test of the negative effects of academically selective schools. American Psychologist, 58, 364-376.
  • Guay, F., Marsh, H. W. & Boivin, M. (2003). Academic self-concept and academic achievement: Development perspectives on their causal ordering. Journal of Educational Psychology, 95, 124-136.
  • Marsh, H. W., Hau, K-T, & Kong, C-K, (2002). Multilevel Modeling of Longitudinal Growth and Change: Substantive Effects or Regression Toward the Mean Artifacts? Multivariate Behavioral Research, 37, 245-282.
  • Jayasinghe, U. W., Marsh, H. W. & Bond, N. (2002). A Multilevel Cross-classified Modelling Approach to Peer Review of Grant Proposals: The Effects of Assessor and Researcher Attributes on Assessor Ratings. Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A-Statistics in Society, 166, 279-300.
  • Marsh, H. W., Ellis, L., & Craven, R. G. (2002). How do preschool children feel about themselves? Unravelling measurement and multidimensional self-concept structure. Developmental Psychology, 38, 376-393.
  • Marsh, H. W. & Hattie, J. (2002). The relationship between research productivity and teaching effectiveness: Complimentary, antagonistic or independent constructs. Journal of Higher Education, 73, 603-642.
  • Marsh, H. W. & Kleitman, S. (2002). Extracurricular school activities: The good, the bad, and the nonlinear. Harvard Educational Review, 72, 464-502.
  • Marsh, H. W., Rowe, K., Martin, A. (2002). PhD students’ evaluations of research supervision: Issues, complexities and challenges in a nationwide Australian experiment in benchmarking universities. Journal of Higher Education, 73 (3), 313-348.
  • Marsh, H. W., Koeller, O., & Baumert, J. (2001). Reunification of East and West German school systems: Longitudinal multilevel modeling study of the big fish little pond effect on academic self-concept. American Educational Research Journal, 38 (2), 321-350.
  • Marsh, H. W., Parada, R. H., Yeung, A. S. & Healey, J. (2001). Aggressive School Troublemakers and Victims:A Longitudinal Model Examining the Pivotal Role of Self-concept. Journal of Educational Psychology, 93(2), 411-419.
  • Marsh, H. W. (2001). Distinguishing between good (useful) and bad workload on students’ evaluations of teaching. American Educational Research Journal, 38 (1), 183-212.
  • Marsh, H. W., Hau, K-T, & Kong, C-K, (2000). Late Immersion and Language of Instruction (English vs. Chinese) in Hong Kong High Schools: Achievement Growth in Language and Nonlanguage Subjects. Harvard Educational Review 70, 302-346.
  • Marsh, H. W., Kong, C-K, Hau, K-T (2000).  Longitudinal Multilevel Modeling of the Big Fish Little Pond Effect on Academic Self-concept:  Counterbalancing Social Comparison and Reflected Glory Effects in Hong Kong High Schools. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 78,  337-349.
  • Marsh, H. W., & Roche, L. A. (2000). Effects of grading leniency and low workloads on students’ evaluations of teaching: Popular myth, bias, validity or innocent bystanders? Journal of Educational Psychology, 92,:202-228.
  • Marsh, H. W., Craven, R. G., & Debus, R. (1998). Structure, stability, and development of young children’s self-concepts: A multicohort-multioccasion study. Child Development, 69(4), 1030-1053.
  • Marsh, H. W., Hau, K-T., Balla, J R., & Grayson, D. (1998) Is more ever too much? The number of indicators per factor in confirmatory factor analysis. Multivariate Behavioral Research, 33, 181-220.
  • Marsh, H. W., & Roche, L. A (1997). Making students’ evaluations of teaching effectiveness effective. American Psychologist, 52, 1187-1197.
  • Marsh, H. W. (1997). The measurement of physical self-concept: A construct validation approach. In K. Fox (Ed.), The physical self-: From motivation to well-being (pp. 27-58). Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.
  • Marsh, H. W.,  & Craven, R. (1997). Academic self-concept: Beyond the dustbowl. In G. Phye (Ed.), Handbook of classroom assessment: Learning, achievement, and adjustment (pp. 131-198). Orlando, FL : Academic Press.

Ingrid Lunt is a psychologist by background, and joined the Oxford Department of Education in 2005, having previously worked for 20 years at the Institute of Education, University of London.

She was Director of Graduate Studies for 5 years, and the first Director of the new ESRC Doctoral Training Centre (DTC) in the Social Sciences.

She has been President of the British Psychological Society (1998-1999), President of the European Federation of Psychologists Associations (1993-1999), and Vice President of the International Union of Psychological Science (2004-2008).

She has carried out research in the field of special educational needs and inclusive education, and more recently in the area of higher education, in particular higher professional education, and doctoral education. For the past 20 years she has been leading a project, initially funded by the European Union, which has been developing a common qualifications framework for psychologists across Europe.

Research

Ingrid’s research interests include higher professional learning, doctoral education, comparative higher education policy in European countries.

Publications

Selected publications include:

  • Scott D., Brown A., Lunt I., Thorne L. (2004) Professional Doctorates: Integrating professional and academic knowledge. Open University Press and SRHE
  • Klenowski V. and Lunt I. (2008) Enhancing Learning at Doctoral Level through the use of reflection? Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education 33, 2, 203-217.
  • Lunt I. (2008) Psychologist qualifications in Europe: Common standards for quality and mobility. Australian Psychologist 43, 4, 222-230
  • Lunt I. (2008) Beyond tuition fees? The legacy of Blair’s government to higher education. Oxford Review of Education 34, 6, 741-752
  • Edwards A., Lunt I., Stamou E. (2010) Inter-professional work and expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools. British Educational Research Journal 36, 1, 27-45
  • Lunt I. (2011) EuroPsy: the development of standards and competence of psychologists. European Psychologist 16, 2, 104-111
  • Lunt I. and Peiro J. M. (2012) The Bologna Process, education and assessment in psychology. In Ed. D. Dunn, S.C Baker, C.M Mehrota, R.E. Landrum, M.M McCarthy Assessing teaching and learning in psychology: current and future perspectives. Wadsworth Publishing, Belmont CA.
  • Lunt I., McAlpine L., Mills D. (2014) Lively bureaucracy: the ESRC’s Doctoral Training Centres and UK universities. Oxford Review of Education 40, 2, 151-170
  • Lunt I. (2014) International frameworks for psychology education and training: a European perspective. In R. Silbereisen, P. Ritchie, J. Panday (eds.) Psychology Education and Training : a global perspective. Hove: Psychology Press
  • Clarke, G. and Lunt, I. (2014) The concept of ‘originality’ in the PhD: how is it interpreted by examiners? Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, 39 (7), 803-820.
  • Lunt I., Peiró J.M., Poortinga Y.H., Roe R.A. (2015) EuroPsy: Standards and Quality in Education for Professional Psychologists. Göttingen: Hogrefe Pub.

Anne joined the Department in 2005 having held Chairs at the Universities of Leeds and Birmingham. She was Director of the Department for three years (January 2010 to December 2012) and when not in that post, she was its Director of Research. She became Professor Emerita in October 2014.

Anne is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, and of the Learned Society of Wales and is a former President of the British Educational Research Association. She is a Fellow of St Hilda’s College and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Oslo from 2007 to 2016 and has been awarded Doctorates honoris causa by the Universities of Helsinki and Oslo and in 2022 she received a lifetime’s achievement award from the American Educational Research Association’s Cultural-Historical SIG.

She was a member of the ESRC’s Research Grants Board between 2003 and 2007 and a member of the Education sub-panel in the 2008 UK Research Assessment Exercise. She is co-founder of OSAT (the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research), is a founding editor of Learning Culture and Social Interaction. She is a member of the UK Cabinet Office’s Research Evidence Impact Panel (REIP), sits on several research advisory boards internationally, undertakes research evaluations for research councils worldwide and continues to be involved in institutional reviews.

Research

Anne’s research draws on cultural-historical approaches to learning. She focuses on professional learning and, in particular, the relational turn in expertise with the concepts of relational expertise, common knowledge and relational agency. These ideas are discussed in her 2010 book with Springer. In her later edited book Working relationally in and across practices (Cambridge University Press, 2017) researchers, who work with her ideas, have tested and refined these concepts in a range of different settings. Her research on practice, relational expertise and inter-professional work with vulnerable children and families also informs her interest in user engagement with research and its implications for the design of educational research. User engagement was discussed in her 2011 book with Mark Rickinson and Judy Sebba, in an exploration of knowledge exchange in the social sciences based in Oxford, and in study of school-university research relationships through the work of school-based research champions.

Her current research, informed by cultural-historical theory, is based at the University of Oslo. The research team has recently completed a Norwegian Research Council study of how elementary school teachers work successfully with shy and withdrawn children. The team has been awarded a further four years’ funding to examine shy children’s experiences of transitions between lessons in high school. She is currently co-authoring a book with Mariane Hedegaard for Cambridge University Press, where the two authors revisit their own research studies to make a case for a relational pedagogy, based in Vygotskian approaches to emotion, development and learning. She is also co-editing, with Helen Bound and Karen Evans and Arthur Chia, a collection for Taylor and Francis on current approaches to workplace learning. Her contribution, with Dorothy Sutherland Olsen, draws on a study of the transitions that arise through the introduction of new technologies into existing workplaces.

Publications since 2009

Books

  • Edwards, A., Daniels, H., Gallagher, T., Leadbetter, J. & Warmington, P. (2009) Improving Inter-professional Collaborations: multi-agency working for children’s wellbeing. London: Routledge.
  • Daniels, H., Edwards, A., Engeström, Y. & Ludvigsen, S. (Eds.) (2009) Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge.
  • Ellis, V., Edwards, A. & Smagorinsky, P.  (Eds.) (2009) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Being an Expert Professional Practitioner: the relational turn in expertise. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Rickinson, M., Sebba, J. & Edwards, A. (2011) Improving User-engagement in Educational Research. London: Routledge.
  • Hedegaard, M., Edwards, A. & Fleer, M. (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wells, G. & Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2013) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Edwards, A. (Ed.) (2017) Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Hedegaard, M.& Edwards, A. (Eds.) (2019) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (Eds.) (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer.
  • Bound, H., Edwards, A. & Evans, K. (Eds.) (forthcoming) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor and Francis.
  • Hedegaard, M. & Edwards, A. (forthcoming) Taking Children Seriously: a relational approach to Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chapters in Books

  • Edwards, A.  (2009) Becoming a Teacher, in H. Daniels, J. Porter & H. Lauder (Eds.) Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning: vol 1. London: Routledge, pp. 153-164.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Agency and Activity Theory: from the systemic to the relational, in A Sannino, H Daniels & K. Guttierez (Eds.) Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 197-211.
  • Edwards, A. & Kinti I. (2009) Working Relationally at Organisational Boundaries: negotiating expertise and identity, in H. Daniels, A. Edwards, Y. Engeström & S. Ludvigsen (Eds.)  Activity Theory in Practice: promoting learning across boundaries and agencies. London: Routledge, pp. 126-139.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) How can CHAT help us to understand and develop teacher education?, in V. Ellis, A. Edwards & P. Smagorinsky (Eds.) Learning Teaching: cultural historical perspectives on teacher education and development. London: Routledge, pp. 63-77.
  • Edwards, A. (2010) Learning How to Know Who: professional learning for expansive practice between organisations, in S Ludvigsen, A. Lund, I. Rasmussen & R. Saljo (Eds.) Learning Across Sites. London: Routledge, pp. 17-32.
  • Edwards, A.  (2010) Qualitative Designs and Analysis, in G. MacNaughton, S. Rolfe & I. Siraj-Blatchford (Eds.) Doing Early Childhood Research: Theory and Process: an international perspective 2nd Edition. Melbourne: Allen and Unwin, pp.155-175.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) Expertise in the Children’s Workforce: knowledge and motivation in engagement with children, in M. Hedegaard, A. Edwards & M. Fleer (Eds.) (2012) Motives, Emotions and Values in the Development of Children and Young People, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 173-190.
  • Edwards, A. & Ellis, V.  (2012) The Professional Development of Teachers: European perspectives, in C. Day (Ed.) International Handbook on Teacher and School Development. London: Routledge.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) User Engagement and the Processes of Educational Research, in L. Farrell & T. Fenwick (Eds.) Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: politics, languages and responsibilities. London:  Routledge
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Integrating Children’s Services, in G. Head (Ed.) Professionals, Children and the Community: working together, London: Pearson.
  • Edwards, A. & Thompson, M. (2013) Resourceful Leadership: revealing the creativity of organizational leaders, in A. Sannino & V. Ellis (Eds.) Learning and Collective Creativity: Activity-Theoretical and Sociocultural Studies. London: Routledge.  pp. 49-64.
  • Childs, A., Edwards, A. & McNicholl, J. (2013) Developing a Multi-layered System of Distributed Expertise: What does cultural historical theory bring to understandings of workplace learning in school university partnerships?, in O. McNamara et al. (Eds.) Teacher Learning in the Workplace: widening perspectives on practice and policy. Dordecht: Springer. pp. 29-45.
  • Lundsteen, N. & Edwards, A. (2013) Internship: navigating the practices of an investment bank, in G. Wells &   Edwards (Eds.) Pedagogy in Higher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.pp.155-168.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Learning from Experience in teaching; a cultural historical critique, in V. Ellis & J. Orchard (Eds.) Learning Teaching from Experience: Multiple Perspectives, International Contexts. London: Bloomsbury.pp.47-61.
  • Edwards, A. (2014) Designing Tasks which Engage Learners with Knowledge, in I. Thompson (Ed.) Task Design,Subject Pedagogy and Student Engagement. London: Routledge. pp. 13-27.
  • Edwards, A. (2016) A Cultural-historical Approach to Practice: working within and across practices, in J. Lynch et al. (Eds.) Practice Theory: Diffractive readings in professional practice and education. London: Routledge.127-140.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural-historical Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: teaching to support student agency, in B. Leibowitz, V. Bozalek & P. Kahn (Eds.) Theorising Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Taylor and Francis. pp.124-138.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Introductory chapter, final chapter and a joint chapter on knowledge exchange in the social sciences with E. Stamou, in A. Edwards (Ed.), Working Relationally In and Across Practices: cultural-historical approaches to collaboration. New York: Cambridge.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Cultural Historical Theory and Pedagogy: the influence of Vygotsky on the field, in R. MacLean (Ed.) Handbook on Life in Schools and Classrooms: Past, present and future visions. Dordrecht, Springer. pp. 153-166.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) Relational Expertise: a cultural-historical approach to teacher education, in Peters, B. Cowie & I Menter (Eds.) A Companion to Research in Teacher Education. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 555-567.
  • Edwards, A. & Montecinos, C. (2017) Working Relationally on Complex Problems: building the capacity for joint agency in new forms of work, in M. Goller & S. Paloniemi (Eds.) Agency at Work. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 229-247.
  • Edwards, A. (2017) The Dialectic of Person and Practice: how cultural-historical accounts of agency can inform teacher education, in J. Clandinin & J. Husu (Eds.) The Sage Handbook on Research on Teacher Education, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. pp.269-285.
  • Edwards, A. & Hedegaard, M. (2019) Rethinking Professional Support for Challenging Transitions: enabling the agency of children, young people and their families, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 1-18.
  • Edwards, A. & Evangelou, M. (2019) Easing Transitions into School for Children from Socially Excluded ‘Hard to Reach’ Families: from risk and resilience to agency and demand, in M.Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 115-130.
  • Edwards, A. & Fay, Y. (2019) Supporting the Transitions to Work of Autistic Young People: building and using common knowledge, in M. Hedegaard & A. Edwards (Eds.) Supporting Difficult Transitions: children, young people and their carers. London: Bloomsbury. pp 262-278.
  • Edwards, A., Fleer, M. & Bøttcher, L. (2019) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp. 1-20.
  • Edwards, A., Chan, J. & Tan, D. (2019) Motive Orientation and the Exercise of Agency: responding to recurrent demands in practices, in A. Edwards et al. (Eds.) Cultural-historical Approaches to Studying Learning and Development: social, institutional and personal perspectives. Singapore: Springer. pp.201-214.
  • Edwards, A. (in press) Learning for a High Skills Economy: what a cultural-historical approach can offer, in H. Bound, A. Chia, J. Tan & R. Lim Wei Ying (Eds.) Flipping the Lens from Teaching to Learning. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Edwards, A. & Sutherland Olsen, D. (forthcoming) Cultural-historical Understandings of Transitions in Changing Workplaces, in H. Bound, A. Edwards, K. Evans, A. Chia (Eds.) Workplace Learning for Changing Circumstances. London: Taylor & Francis.
  • Edwards, A. (forthcoming) A Relational View of a Future-oriented Pedagogy: sustaining the agency of learners and teachers, in N. Hopwood & A. Sannino (Eds.) Agency and Transformation: Motives, mediation and motion. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Refereed Articles

  • Edwards, A. (2009) Understanding Boundaries in Inter-professional Work, The Scottish Educational Review, 41, 1, 5-21.
  • Edwards, A. (2009) Relational Agency in Collaborations for the Wellbeing of Children and Young People, Journal of Children’s Services, 4, 1, 33-43.
  • Shaw, I., Morris, K &. Edwards, A. (2009) Technology, Social Services and Organizational Innovation or How Great Expectations in London and Cardiff are Dashed in Lowestoft and Cymtyrch, Journal of Social Work Practice,  23, 4, 383 – 400.
  • Edwards, A., Lunt, I. & Stamou, E. (2010) Inter-professional Work and Expertise: new roles at the boundaries of schools, British Educational Research Journal, 36, 1, 27-45.
  • Edwards, A. (2011) Building Common Knowledge at Boundaries between Professional Practices, International Journal of Educational Research 50, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A & Daniels, H. (2012) The knowledge that matters in professional practices Journal of Education and Work 25, 1, 33-39.
  • Edwards, A. (2012) The role of common knowledge in achieving collaboration across practices Learning Culture and Social Interaction 1, 1, 22-32.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) A Tool for Public Services Research and Development, International Journal of Public Management. 11,1, 21-33.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Discussant’s Comments: Recognising and Realising Teachers’ Professional Agency, Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice. 21, 6, 779-784.
  • Fancourt, N., Edwards, A. & Menter, I. (2015) Reimagining a School – University Partnership: the development of the Oxford Education Deanery narrative, Education Inquiry, 6, 3, 353-373. http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/edui.v6.27724
  • Hopwood, N., Day, C. & Edwards, A. (2016) Partnership Practice as Collaborative Knowledge Work: overcoming common dilemmas through an augmented view of professional expertise, Journal of Children’s Services. 11, 2, 111-123.
  • Engeness, I. & Edwards, A. (2016) The Complexity of Learning: Exploring the Interplay of Different Mediational Means in Group Learning with Digital Tools, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 61, 1, 650-667. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2016.1173093
  • Hopwood, N. & Edwards, A. (2017) How common knowledge is constructed and why it matters in collaboration between professionals and clients, International Journal of Educational Research, 83, 107–119.
  • Edwards, A. (2020) Agency, Common Knowledge and Motive Orientation: working with insights from Hedegaard in research on provision for vulnerable children and young people, Learning Culture and Social Interaction. 26, 100224. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.lcsi.2018.04.004
  • Mjelve, L.H., Nyborg, G., Edwards, A.& Crozier, R. (2019) Teachers’ Understandings of Shyness: psychosocial differentiation for student inclusion, British Educational Research Journal. 45(6), 1295- doi:10.1002/berj.3563
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, H., Edwards, A. & Crozier, R. (2020 ) Teachers’ Strategies for Enhancing Shy Children’s Engagement in Oral Activities: necessary but insufficient? International Journal of Inclusive Education. 1-16. doi:10.1080/13603116.2020.1711538
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A. & Nyborg, G. (2020) Leading for School Inclusion: how school leadership teams support shy students, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research. 1-14. doi:10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Solberg, S., Edward, A., Mjelve, L.H., & Nyborg, G. (in press). Working relationally with networks of support within schools: Supporting teachers in their work with shy students. Journal of Education for Children Placed at Risk (JESPAR), 1-23. doi.org/10.1080/10824669.2020.1854760
  • Solberg, S., Edwards, A., & Nyborg, G. (2020). Leading for school inclusion and prevention? How school leadership teams support shy students and their teachers. Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, 1-14. doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2020.1788156
  • Burn, K. Conway, R., Edwards, A. & Harries, E. (2021) The Role of School-based Research Champions in a School-University Partnership. British Educational Research Journal, 47(3). 616-633. doi.org/10.1002/berj.3675
  • Rickinson, M. & Edwards, A. (2021) The Relational Features of Evidence Use, Cambridge Journal of Education, 51(4), 509-526.  doi.org/10.1080/0305764X.2020.1865877
  • Nyborg, G., Mjelve, L.H., Edwards, A., Crozier, R. & Coplan, R. (2022) Working relationally with shy students: pedagogical insights from teachers and students. Learning, Culture and Social Interaction. authors.elsevier.com/sd/article/S2210-6561(22)00011-3

Reports

  • Edwards, A. & Stamou, E. (2009) The Development of Preventative Practices in England: implications for the children’s workforce. DCSF: Children’s Workforce Development Council
  • Hannan, S., Canwell, A. Longfils, H. & Edwards, A. (2011) The Resourceful Leader, Nottingham: National College
  • Daniels, H. & Edwards, A. (2012) Leading the Learning: how the intelligent leader builds capacity. Nottingham: National College.
  • Edwards, A. & Downes, P. (2013) Alliances for Inclusion: cross-sector policy synergies and inter-professional collaboration in and around schools. NESET for the European Commission.
  • Alexander, P., Edwards, A., Fancourt, N. & Menter, I. (2014) Raising and Sustaining Aspiration in City Schools. Oxford University: CitiFoundation.
  • Edwards, A. (2015) Inter-professional Working in and around Schools, in C. McLaughlin (Ed.) The Connected School: a design for wellbeing. London: Pearson / NCB.

Geoffrey Walford is Emeritus Professor of Education Policy and an Emeritus Fellow of Green Templeton College at the University of Oxford.

He was previously Reader in Education Policy at Oxford, and Senior Lecturer in Sociology and Education Policy at Aston Business School, Aston University, Birmingham.

He has academic degrees from Oxford, Kent, London and the Open Universities, has authored or edited more than 40 books, and published rather too many academic articles and book chapters. He was Joint Editor of the British Journal of Educational Studies from 1999 to 2002, and was Editor of the Oxford Review of Education from 2004 to 2010. He remains as a Deputy Editor of Ethnography and Education and serves on several editorial boards.

Professor Walford’s main research foci are the relationships between central government policy and local processes of implementation, private schools, choice of schools, religiously-based schools, and ethnographic research methodology. He remains engaged with various scholarly writing activities working, in particular, on issues connected to private schooling for the poor and social justice. He was awarded a DLitt from Oxford University in 2016.

Publications

Major articles and book chapters

  • Geoffrey Walford (2023) ‘Low-fee private schools.’  In Bob Tierney, Fazal Rizvi and Kadriye Wrcikan (editors-in-chief); Fazal Rizvi and Jason Beech (eds.) Section 1, Globalization and shifting geopolitics of education, International Encyclopedia of Education 4th edition, Vol 1 (Oxford: Elsevier) pp.355-365.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2022) ‘Country houses repurposed as private schools: what might be the motivations?’  Oxford Review of Education, 48, 1, pp. 14-27.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2021) ‘Country houses repurposed as private schools: building on inequality.’ Oxford Review of Education, 47, 3, pp. 369-385.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2021) ‘What is worthwhile auto-ethnography? Research in the age of the selfie.’ Ethnography and Education, 16, 1, pp. 31-43.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2020) ‘Interviews and interviewing in the ethnography of education.’ In George W. Noblit. (ed.) Oxford Encyclopedia of Qualitative Research Methods in Education (New York: Oxford University Press) (Reprint) pp. 672-685.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2020) ‘Ethnography is not qualitative.’ Ethnography and Education, 15, 1, pp. 122-136.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2019) ‘The provenance of Stowe. Percy Warrington: the founder schools wished to forget.’ History of Education Researcher, 104, pp. 100-108.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2018) ‘The impossibility of anonymity in ethnographic research.’ Qualitative Research, 18, 5, pp. 516-525.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2018) ‘Interviews and interviewing in the ethnography of education.’Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Education, Editor in Chief: George W. Noblit. On-line. DOI: 10.1093/acrefore/9780190264093.013.320, May, pp. 20.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2018) ‘Recognisable continuity. A defence of multiple methods.’ In Dennis Beach, Carl Bagley, and Sofia Maques da Silva (eds.) The Wiley Handbook of Ethnography of Education (London, Wiley) pp. 17-29.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2017) ‘Ruling-class classification and framing.’ In Agnés Van Zanten (ed.) Elites in Education, Volume 2, National Traditions and Cosmopolitism in Elite Education. (London, Routledge) (Reprint)
  • Geoffrey Walford (2016) ‘Ethnographic methodology: A Virtual Special Issue of Ethnography and Education. Introduction.’ Ethnography and Education.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2015) ‘The globalisation of low-fee private schools’ In Joseph Zajda (ed.) Second International Handbook on Globalisation, Education and Policy Research (Amsterdam, Springer) ISBN: 978-94-017-9492-3, pp. 309-20.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2014) ‘Site selection within comparative case study and ethnographic research.’ (Reprint) In Malcolm Tight (ed.) Case Studies (London, Sage)
  • Ian Macpherson, Susan Robertson and Geoffrey Walford (2014) ‘An introduction to privatisation, education and social justice.’ In Ian Macpherson, Susan Robertson and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) Education, Privatisation, and Social Justice: Case studies from Africa, South Asia, and South East Asia (Abingdon, Symposium) pp. 9-24.
  • Ingrid Lunt and Geoffrey Walford (2014) ‘Contributions to the sociology of education: Past, present and future. A Festschrift for John Furlong.’ Oxford Review of Education, 40, 4, pp. 411-414.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2014) ‘From City Technology Colleges to Free schools: Ideas of social justice.’ Research Papers in Education, 29, 3, pp. 315-329.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2014) ‘Introduction: Academies, Free Schools and social Justice.’ Research Papers in Education, 29, 3, pp. 263-267.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2013) ‘The development of private and public schools in England.’ In Aydin Gürlevik, Christian Palentien and Robert Heyer (eds.) Privatschulen versus staatliche Schulen (Wiesbaden, Germany: Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden) pp. 89-102.  ISBN: (pb) 978-3-531-18199-8; (e-book) 978-3-531-18978-9.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2013) ‘Low-fee private schools: a methodological and political debate.’ In Prachi Srivastava (ed.) Low-Fee Private Schooling: Aggravating equity or mitigating disadvantage? (Oxford: Symposium Books) pp. 199-213. ISBN: 978-1-873927-91-5.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2013) ‘State support for private schooling in India: What do the evaluations of the British Assisted Places Schemes suggest?’ Oxford Review of Education, 39, 4, pp. 533-547.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2013) ‘The development of private and public schools in England.’ In Aydin Gürlevik, Christian Palentien and Robert Heyer (eds.) Privatschulen versus staatliche Schulen (Wiesbaden, Germany: Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden) pp. 89-102.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2013) ‘Low-fee private schools: a methodological and political debate.’ In Prachi Srivastava (ed.) Low-Fee Private Schooling: Aggravating equity or mitigating disadvantage? (Oxford, Symposium Books) pp. 199-213.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2012) ‘Researching the powerful in education: a re-assessment of the problems.’ International Journal for Research and Method in Education, 35, 2, pp. 111-118
  • Geoffrey Walford (2011) ‘Globalization and low-fee private schools?’ Educational Practice and Theory, 33, 1, pp. 37-50.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2011) ‘The Oxford Ethnography Conference: A place in history?’ Ethnography and Education, 6, 2, pp. 133-145.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2011) ‘Low-fee private schools in England and in less economically developed countries. What can we learn from a comparison?’ Compare, 41, 3, pp. 401-413.
  • Eric Tucker, Madhu Viswanathan and Geoffrey Walford (2010) ‘Reflections on social measurement:  How social scientists generate, modify, and validate indicators and scales.’ In Geoffrey Walford, Eric Tucker and Madhu Viswanathan (eds.) The Sage Handbook of Measurement(London, Sage) pp. 1-5.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2010) ‘Faith-based schools in England after ten years of Tony Blair’, in Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Blair’s Educational Legacy? (London, Routledge) pp. 52-62.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2009) ‘For ethnography?’ Ethnography and Education, 4, 3, pp. 273-284.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2009) ‘Private schools in England.’ Zeitschrift für Pädagogik, 55, 5, pp. 716- 731.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2009) ‘The practice of writing ethnographic fieldnotes.’ Ethnography and Education, 4, 2, pp. 117-130.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2009) ‘Symposium review of: John Beck, Meritocracy, Citizenship and Education’ (with Anthony Giddens and Yoshiko Nozaki) British Journal of Sociology of Education, 30, 1, pp. 97-105.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘Finding the limits: autoethnography and being an Oxford University Proctor.’ In Paul Atkinson and Sara Delamont (eds.) Representing Ethnography (London, Sage) pp. 147-162.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘Selecting sites, and gaining ethical and practical access.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.)How to do Educational Ethnography (London, Tufnell Press) pp. 16-38.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘The nature of educational ethnography.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) How to do Educational Ethnography (London, Tufnell Press) pp. 1-15.
  • Martin Forsey, Scott Davies and Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘The globalisation of school choice: an introduction to key issues and concerns.’ In Martin Forsey, Scott Davies and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) The Globalisation of School Schoice? (Abingdon, Symposium Books) pp. 9-25.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘School choice in England: globalisation, policy borrowing or policy corruption? In Martin Forsey, Scott Davies and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) The Globalisation of School Schoice? (Abingdon, Symposium Books) pp. 95-109.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ’Faith-based schools in England after 10 years of Tony Blair.’ Oxford Review of Education, 34, 6, pp. 689-699.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2008) ‘Muslim schools in England and the Netherlands: sustaining cultural continuity.’ In Zvi Bekerman and Ezra Kopelowitz (eds.) Cultural Education – Cultural Sustainability: Minority, diaspora, indigenous and ethno-religious groups in multicultural societies. (London, Routledge)
  • Geoffrey Walford (2007) ‘Finding the limits: autoethnography and being an Oxford University Proctor.’ In Alan Bryman (ed.) Qualitative Research 2, Volume 3 Issues of Representation and reflexivity (London, Sage) pp. 214-229.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2007) ‘Classification and framing of interviews in ethnographic interviewing. Ethnography and Education, 2, 2, pp. 145-157.
  • Geoffrey Walford and Prachi Srivastava (2007) ‘Examining Private Schooling in Less Economically Developed Countries: Key Issues and New Evidence.’ In Prachi Srivastava and Geoffrey Walford (2007) (eds.) Private Schooling in Less-Economically Developed Countries: Asian and African perspectives (Abingdon, Symposium Books)
  • Geoffrey Walford (2007) ‘Everyone generalizes, but ethnographers should resist doing so.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Methodological Developments in Ethnography (Studies in Educational Ethnography, Volume 12) (Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, Elsevier)
  • Geoffrey Walford (2006) ‘New Christian schools in England: What are the equity mplications?’ International Journal of Learning, 13, 5, pp. 167-176.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2006) ‘From City Technology Colleges to sponsored grant-maintained schools.’ In David Phillips and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) Tracing Education Policy. Selections from the Oxford Review of Education(London, Routledge) pp. 359-375.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2006) ‘Introduction: education and the Labour Government.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) Education and the Labour Government. An evaluation of two terms. (London, Routledge).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2005) ‘Learning and the local community: Is community involvement always a good thing?’ International Journal of Learning, 11, pp. 1219-1225.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2005) ‘Research ethical guidelines and anonymity.’ International Journal of Research and Method in Education, 28, 1, pp. 83-93.
  • Holger Daun, Reza Arjmand and Geoffrey Walford (2004) ‘Muslims and education in a global context.’ In Holger Daun and Geoffrey Walford (eds.) Educational Strategies among Muslims in the Context of Globalization. Some National Case Studies. (Leiden, Boston, Brill) pp. 5-36.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2004) ‘Private schooling in England’ (in Chinese) Journal of Non-Government Educational Development, 103, pp. 55-60.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2004) ‘When tradition meets modern law: changing the role of the Oxford University Proctors.’ Research in Education, 72, pp. 103-114.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2004) ‘No discrimination on the basis of irrelevant qualifications.’ Cambridge Journal of Education, 34, 3, pp. 353-361.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2004) ‘Finding the limits: autoethnography and being an Oxford University Proctor.’Qualitative Research, 4, 3, pp. 403-417.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘Country Report on school-based management in England.’ Precedings of the Third International Forum on Educational Reform Education Decentralization Revisited: School-Based Management(Bangkok, Office of the Education Council) pp. 1-23.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘Separate schools for religious minorities in England and the Netherlands: using a framework for the comparison and evaluation of policy.’Research Papers in Education , 18, 3, pp 1-19.
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘School choice, educational change and inequality in England.’ In The Organising Committee (eds.) Proceedings of the 37th Annual Conference of the Japan Educational Administration Society(Tokyo, Dojidai Sha, Nichi-nichi Kyoiku Bunko)  pp. 19-49 (in Japanese) pp.147-172 (in English).
  • Geoffrey Walford (2003) ‘Muslim schools in Britain.’ In Geoffrey Walford (ed.) British Private Schools: research on policy and practice. (London, Wob