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Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Sam is currently a tutor on the maths PGCE course and head of mathematics at Wood Green School. His main research interests are task design, mixed attainment teaching and teachers’ professional development. Sam’s masters research focussed on how mathematics teachers engage in professional development. He also co-authored an ATM publication on planning for mixed attainment teaching at GCSE.

Sally Carter Tabasso is a curriculum tutor for the PGCE English course. She also teaches English and Film at the Unicorn School in Abingdon, a Specialist School supporting pupils with dyslexia and related learning difficulties.

Between 2001 and 2018 Sally taught at St Birinus School in Didcot, holding various positions including Professional Tutor, English and Media Faculty leader and English mentor.  Between 1998 and 2001, Sally taught at the British Institute in Munich. Before deciding to complete a PGCE to become a teacher, Sally worked in logistics and marketing for several international companies.

Jonny is an Honorary Norham Fellow. He was educated in comprehensive schools in Oxfordshire, before gaining his degree in Theology & Religion at Durham University, specialising in Biblical theology, sociology of religion, feminist and queer theology and alternative religious movements. This was followed by a PGCE in Religious Education from Oxford in 2009, where he completed his dissertation on the use of the word ‘gay’ in secondary schools, considering both its negative and positive use and the impact of these on students.

He has held a number of roles, including Head of Sixth Form, Head of Department and Lead Practitioner, where he has developed his interest in teacher education and in the field of equality, diversity and inclusion, specifically with regard to feminist, queer and anti-racist curriculum design and students’ personal development.

Jonny has worked with the Department of Education for several years as both as a school-based mentor and as a curriculum tutor on the PGCE in Religious Education, finding both roles extremely rewarding. He is particularly interested in how we can use RE to help students become active and engaged members of our society and how we can ensure that RE remains central to a strong comprehensive education.

Margaret Mulholland is a specialist in inclusivity and Special Educational Needs. She is advisor on SEND policy for the Association of School and College Leaders and Whole School SEND Project Director leading an evaluation for the Education Endowment Foundation.

A leading advocate for the role SEND settings play in improving understanding of inclusive teaching and learning, Margaret brings over 20 years experience in ITT innovation and practice. She spent seven years as Director of Development & Research at a leading Special School and thirteen years at the Institute of Education, where she was responsible for innovative employment based routes to QTS, PGCE secondary partnerships and a Challenge Partners school leadership programme. Margaret sits on the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers, is an advisor to the UK Government on ITT curriculum development and works with local authorities as an external advisor for NQTs, ITT and leadership development. She is also writes a column on research and inclusivity for the Times Educational Supplement.

Clare is Honorary Research Fellow for the Department of Education, and Professor of Education at UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Until recently, Clare was Pro-Director for Education, at the IOE, a role with oversight of the strategic development of Education across the IOE’s portfolio. Prior to that, she was both Head of Department, Curriculum Pedagogy and Assessment, and Head of Initial Teacher Education, and alongside these leadership roles, she developed research interests into the quality and development of teacher education particularly when enacted at scale.

Her background is in geography education: she was a geography teacher in East London, then as a geography teacher educator at IOE, developing both initial and continuing teacher education programmes, and focusing her research interest on the importance of subject identity for teacher professional practice, with a particular emphasis on geographical subject knowledge. She has been very active in the international geography education community, acting as Co-Chair of the International Geographical Union Commission for Geography Education, and editor of their book series, and Chair for the UK-based Geography Education Research Collective.

She has undertaken a range of consultancy-based work around ITE (nationally and internationally), and was the Director of the research Centre on Teacher and Early Years education. Her latest research has been focused around an international research project looking at high quality initial teacher education at scale, and the use of spatial theory to gain a deeper understanding of teacher education in different contexts.


Selected Recent Publications

Brooks, C. (2022) “Teachers’ research capacity and initial teacher education policy.” International Encyclopedia of Education, 4th edition, Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.04091-4

Brooks, C. McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2022) “Learning to think, perform and act with integrity: does teacher education have a signature pedagogy, and does it matter?” London Review of Education Special Issue: Rising to the challenge of teacher education to prepare teachers for today’s world. Due for publication 2023.

Brooks, C., Gong, Q., Salinas, V, Rochas, AA. (2022) “Spatial Perspectives on Teacher Education” Chapter for The Palgrave Handbook of Teacher Education Research.

Brooks, C. (2022). Mentoring as a spatial practice. In G. Healy, S. Puttick, L. Hammond & N. Walshe. (Eds.). Mentoring Geography Teachers in the Secondary School: A Practical Guide. London: Routledge, Ch.4.

Brooks, C. (2021) Initial Teacher Education at Scale; Quality Conundrums. London, Routledge.

Brooks, C., McIntyre, J. and Mutton, T. (2021) Teacher Education Policy Making during the Pandemic. Special Issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice entitled: The Drive for Equity and Quality in the Time of Covid-19: Considerations and Implications for Teachers and Teaching. DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1997984

Brooks, C., (2021). The quality conundrum in initial teacher education, Teachers and Teaching, 27:1-4, 131-146, DOI: 10.1080/13540602.2021.1933414
Brooks, C. (2021). Quality at scale: Strategies for large-scale initial teacher education programmes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 107. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2021.103490

Brooks, C., & Kitto, E. (2021). Folk Pedagogies of Change: Developing an Early Years Education Development Strategy for China. Early Years: an international research journal. doi:10.1080/09575146.2021.1935495

Brooks, C. (2021). Research capacity in initial teacher education: trends in joining the ‘village’. Teaching Education. doi:10.1080/10476210.2020.1862077
Brooks, C. (2016) Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practice: Teaching with a professional compass (part of Foundations and Futures of Education Series). London, Routledge.

Brooks C (2012) Changing times in England: the influence on geography teachers’ professional practice. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education. 21:4, 297-309

 

 

Jonathan is an Honorary Norham Fellow in the Department of Education, and a member of the Department’s SKOPE research centre.

At the University of Oxford, Jonathan is Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange, a Pro-Vice-Chancellor without portfolio, and President of Kellogg College.

Jonathan is Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Managing Editor of the International Review of Applied Economics, and was an Interdisciplinary Panel Member for REF2021. Jonathan was co-secretary to the Centenary Commission on Adult Education – see www.CentenaryCommission.org – and was awarded an OBE for services to education.

 

Publications

A Reader’s Guide to Social Science (editor), Fitzroy Dearborn & Routledge, 2001
The Handbook of Globalisation (editor), Edward Elgar, 2003, 2nd Edition 2011, 3rd Edition 2019
Why the Social Sciences Matter (editor, with Cary Cooper), Macmillan, 2015
An Advanced Introduction to Globalisation, Edward Elgar, 2017

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Stein Dankert Kolstø is a Professor of Science Education and is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. After taking a master’s degree in physics, he completed his Ph.D. in science education at the University of Oslo in 2001.

His research interest covers two main areas. The first area is teaching for democratic participation in socio-scientific issues. This includes research on how students use science in their own argumentation and decision-making and how students read and analyse multimodal science-related media texts.

The second area of interest is dialogue, argumentation, and inquiry in science education. He is particularly interested in how the use of dialogue and inquiry might enhance students’ productive disciplinary engagement, and the role of inquiry in developing environmental awareness.

Currently, he is principal researcher in the Argument-project ran by the municipality of Bergen in cooperation with the University of Bergen and the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and involving science teachers at three lower secondary schools.

Kolstø has teaching experience from upper secondary school and has taught pre-service science teachers at the University of Bergen for over 20 years. He is on the Editorial Board of Nordic Studies in Science Education.

View his website.

 

Publications

Gjerde, V., Gray, R., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). The Covid-19 shutdown: when studying turns digital, students want more structure. Physics Education, 56(5), 055004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac031e

Gjerde, V., Holst, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2021). Integrating effective learning strategies in basic physics lectures: A thematic analysis. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010124

Kolstø, S. D. (2020). Teaching Robust Argumentation Informed by the Nature of Science to Support Social Justice. Experiences from two Projects in Lower Secondary Schools in Norway, Chapter 10 In H. Yacoubian and L. Hansson (Ed), Nature of Science for Social Justice. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47260-3

Gjerde, V., Hoist, B., & Kolsto, S. D. (2020). Retrieval practice of a hierarchical principle structure in university introductory physics: Making stronger students. Physical Review Physics Education Research, 16(1), 6. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.16.013103

Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Use of dialogue to scaffold students’ inquiry-based learning. NorDiNa, 14(2), 154-169. http://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.6164

Johansen, G., Jónsdóttir, G., & Kolstø, S. D. (2018). Enacting Citizenship in Ordinary School Science Through Deliberative Communication. In K. Otrel-Cass, M. K. Sillasen, & A. A. Orlander (Eds.), Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education : A Nordic View (pp. 113-132). Cham: Springer International Publishing. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61191-4_10

Doksæter Sivle, A., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Use of online weather information in everyday decision-making by laypeople and implications for communication of weather information. Meteorological Applications, 23(4), 650-662. http://doi.org/10.1002/met.1588

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2016). Characterizing Students’ Attempts to Explain Observations from Practical Work: Intermediate Phases of Understanding. Research in Science Education, 1-22. http://doi.org.10.1007/s11165-016-9534-x

Bjønness, B., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space. NorDiNa, 11(3), 223-237. https://doi.org/10.5617/nordina.878

Hauan, N. P., DeWitt, J., & Kolstø, S. D. (2015). Proposing an evaluation framework for interventions: focusing on students’ behaviours in interactive science exhibitions. International Journal of Science Education, Part B, 1-18. http://doi.org.10.1080/21548455.2015.1099079

Mestad, I., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Using the concept of ZPD to explore the challenges of and opportunities in designing discourse activities based on practical work. Science Education, 98(6), 1054–1076.

Sivle, A. D., Kolstø, S. D., Hansen, P. J. K., & Kristiansen, J. (2014). How do Laypeople Evaluate the Degree of Certainty in a Weather Report? A Case Study of the Use of the Web Service yr.no. Weather, Climate and Society, 6(3), 399-412.

Hauan, N. P., & Kolstø, S. D. (2014). Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres. NorDiNa, 10(1), 90-104.

 

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.