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Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Mike is a doctoral student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2022 with a M.A. in Social Sciences (concentration: Psychology) and a graduate certificate in Education and Society. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2021 with a B.S. (honors) in Human Development and Family Sciences, a minor in Education Psychology, and a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Children and Society.

Prior to commencing his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, Mike worked as an international high school teacher in China. He is interested in investigating the educational and developmental implications of international bilingual k-12 education in China. He comes from Beijing, China and his hobbies include sports, travel, and outdoor activities.

Supervisors

Hamish Chalmers and Victoria Murphy

Holly’s research focuses on exploring how unconscious cognitive processes support language acquisition and processing.

She has previously used a range of novel behavioural paradigms to investigate how these processes change across development in individuals with and without language difficulties. Holly is currently working with Dr Liz Wonnacott on a project funded by the Leverhulme Trust to determine the relevance of discriminative learning models for understanding human language.

Publications

PAPERS

Jenkins, H., Leung, P., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., & Wilson, B. (2023). Assessing Processing-Based Measures of Implicit Statistical Learning. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/baupz

Wilson, B., Jenkins, H.,E. (2022). Implicit Learning in Primates: Insights from Comparative Research in Reber, A. S., Allen, R. (Eds.). The Cognitive Unconscious: The First Half-Century. NY: Oxford University Press.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Innovating Measures of Cognitive Function in Childhood. Centre for Transformative Neuroscience Launch Event, 2nd December 2020

Artificial Grammar Learning Deficits in Dyslexia. Institute of Neuroscience Welcome Event, 5th December 2018

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2019). Artificial Grammar Learning Tasks using Speech Stimuli Reveal Intact, but Slower, Sequence Processing in Dyslexia. Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning Conference, 2019, San Sebastian, Spain.

Jenkins, H. E., Smith, F., Riches, N. G., Petkov, C. I., Wilson, B. (2020). A Visual Recall Paradigm to Assess Implicit Statistical Learning. CogSci, 2020, Toronto, Canada.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M.  Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  2. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438 DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  3. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  4. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  5. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202 140-146
  6. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  7. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang.  Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  8. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  9. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  10. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  11. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  12. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  13. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  14. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  15. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  16. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  17. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  18. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  19. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  20. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  21. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  22. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  23. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  24. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International ConferenceLinguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  25. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  26. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national University “Ostrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  27. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in