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Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’.